Served Like A Girl Screening 5/22

Join KLRU and the Austin Film Society for our Indie Lens Pop Up screening of Served Like a Girl. This free screening takes place May 22nd at 7 pm (doors open at 6:30 pm) at the AFS Cinema at 6259 Middle Fiskville Rd, Austin, TX 78752.

Served Like a Girl provides a candid look at a shared sisterhood to help the rising number of homeless women veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and suffer from PTSD, sexual abuse, and other traumas. By entering into the “Ms. Veteran America” competition, these amazing ladies unexpectedly come full circle in a quest for healing and hope.

The film, by Lysa Heslov, airs on KLRU on Memorial Day, May 28th, at 9 pm.

Celebrate Earth Day with Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky screening 4/22

Join KLRU for our Indie Lens Pop Up screening of Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky by Austin filmmaker Laura Dunn. This free screening takes place April 22nd at 1:30 pm at the AFS Cinema at 6259 Middle Fiskville Rd, Austin, TX 78752.

Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky is a portrait of the changing landscapes and shifting values of rural America through the voice of writer, farmer, and activist Wendell Berry. Centered in his native Henry County, Kentucky, Look & See is an elegy to a lost way of life that was once the bedrock of America–the culture of agriculture.

Doors open at 1 pm. Refreshments will be available for purchase. Screening will be first come, first served until capacity is reached.

Indie Lens Pop Up Screening: Tell Them We Are Rising 2/15

Join KLRU and our community partners for a screening of Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities by Stanley Nelson and Marco Williams. This free Indie Lens Pop Up screening takes place Feb. 15th at 6:30 pm at the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center. RSVP now

Tell Them We Are Rising explores the pivotal role historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have played over the course of 150 years in American history, culture, and identity. This film reveals the rich history of HBCUs and the power of higher education to transform lives and advance civil rights and equality in the face of injustice.

Doors open at 6 pm, Screening starts at 6:30 pm. RSVP now

Thanks to our partners:

Indie Lens Pop Up screening I Am Not Your Negro 1/17

Don’t miss KLRU’s screening of one of the most acclaimed films of the year, I Am Not Your Negro. This free Indie Lens Pop Up screening takes place Jan. 17th at 7 pm at the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center.

This Oscar nominee for Best Documentary envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words, spoken by Samuel L. Jackson.

Doors open at 6:30 pm, Screening starts at 7 pm.

Thanks to our partners:

Indie Lens Pop-Up Preview Screening of Real Boy 6/6

Join KLRU and the Austin Public Library for the Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the documentary Real Boy by Shaleece Haas. This free event takes place Tuesday, June 6th, at 7 pm at the Austin Public Library Windsor Park Branch 5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723. GLSEN Austin Board members will be in attendance to discuss the work the organization is doing in our community.

A moving and intimate story of a family in transition, Real Boy follows the journey of trans teen Bennett as he navigates adolescence, sobriety, and the physical and emotional ramifications of his changing gender identity. Through the process, his mother Suzy makes her own transformation — traveling a difficult road toward accepting that the daughter she raised as Rachael is now her son Bennett. Filmed over the course of four years, Real Boy is a love story about a mother and son who rediscover connection with each other and find support from their communities, reminding us that families are not only given, but chosen. Real Boy premieres on KLRU Monday, June 19, at 9 pm.

“All I want is to be loved by my family, but for my family, it’s not as simple as that,” says Bennett. “It’s complicated for them.” Through interviews with Suzy and old home movies, we meet Bennett as a joyful, happy child, but that changed as he grew older. Adolescence brought anger, substance abuse, and self-destructive behaviors. When Bennett began to share his true identity as male, he felt happier inside but faced resistance from his family. Finding solace online with other teens facing the same issues, the aspiring musician is also taken under the wing of his idol Joe Stevens, a celebrated transgender musician fighting his own demons.

Through observational storytelling that is alternately heartbreaking and humorous, Real Boy offers a clear-eyed look at a family tested by a change they never imagined, the complexity of addiction, the healing power of music, and the unbreakable bond between mother and child.

Members of GLSEN Austin will be at the event to talk about the organization’s work in the community. Board members scheduled to attend include:

Jessica Toste, PhD, is the Chair of GLSEN Austin and a member of GLSEN’s National Board of Directors. She is an assistant professor of special education at The University of Texas at Austin, and she research focuses on effective reading interventions for students with learning disabilities or significant reading challenges. She is also a member of the Board of Directors of Disability Rights Texas.

Amanda McClelland has been a board member with GLSEN Austin since October 2016. She is also PhD student in Special Education at the University of Texas Austin. Amanda works to advocate for and improve the lives of all students within our schools.

Brandon Beck, PhD, is a queer, trans man from San Marcos, TX. He is a poet and educator. You can follow him, his writing, and his advocacy at www.transteacher.com.

Erin Kelly has a master’s degree in School Counseling. She has worked as a public high school educator in Austin for the past 10 years. She volunteers as a Gay Straight Alliance Club sponsor at her high school, CASA volunteer, and an advocate for Texas legislation supporting foster  teens aging out of the system.

Indie Lens Pop-Up is a neighborhood series that brings people together for film screenings and community-driven conversations. Featuring documentaries seen on PBS’s Independent Lens, Indie Lens Pop-Up draws local residents, leaders and organizations to discuss what matters most, from newsworthy topics, to family and relationships. Make friends, share stories, and join the conversation.

Indie Lens Pop-Up screening: National Bird 4/4

Join KLRU and the Austin Public Library for the Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the documentary National Bird. This free event takes place Tuesday, April 4th, at 7 pm at the Austin Public Library Windsor Park Branch 5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723.

National Bird follows whistleblowers who, despite possible consequences, are determined to break the silence around one of the most controversial issues of our time: the secret U.S. drone war. The film gives rare insight through the eyes of both survivors and veterans who suffer from PTSD while plagued by guilt over participating in the killing of faceless people in foreign countries.

We will have special guest Alan Pogue sharing his experiences after the film.  Alan Pogue was drafted into the U.S. Army in the summer of 1966 and volunteered to be a medic. After medic training he was asked to be a chaplain’s assistant. He volunteered to go to Vietnam as a chaplain’s assistant. After a short time in Vietnam he volunteered to be a combat medic with the 198th Light Infantry, near Chu Lai. As a combat medic he witnessed not only the death and wounding of fellow soldiers but also the gratuitous murder and general harm done to the Vietnamese population by indiscriminate assault, napalm, bombs of all kinds and sizes, and the poisoning of the countryside with Agent Orange. Once back in the United States he soon joined the Vietnam Veterans Against the War. His interest in photography started in Vietnam and so the documentation of social injustice became central to my photography. In 1998 the American Friends Service Committee asked him to visit Iraq and document the sufering of the general Iraqi population due to the embargo basic food and medical supplies.Voices in the Wilderness, an anti-snactions group, asked him to return to Iraq for the missile strikes on Baghdad. He photographed the the effects of indiscriminate missile strikes on hospitals, neighborhoods and the resultant maiming and death. Veterans for Peace asked him to help in the rebuilding of a water treatment plant in southern Iraq which had fallen into disrepair because the parts need were embargoed. There he met Asraa, a ten year old girl whose arm had been blown off by a U.S. Navy jet that fired a missile near her middle school. He met Mustafa who was harmed and his brother Haider killed in a similar missile strike in Basra. Later he met Asraa, three years old, whose eyes were struck by tiny metal fragments from a tank round fired into her home by the U.S. Army. He helped bring these three children to the United States for medical care. He also saw hundreds die who were beyond help. Many of these children could have lived with proper medical care but neither the medicine nor the medical equipment was there because of the sanctions imposed by the U.S. and Britain. Often groups he was with brought in medicine even though bringing the medicine was against U.S. law. Some of his friends were prosecuted for helping sick and dying children.

Indie Lens Pop-Up is a neighborhood series that brings people together for film screenings and community-driven conversations. Featuring documentaries seen on PBS’s Independent Lens, Indie Lens Pop-Up draws local residents, leaders and organizations to discuss what matters most, from newsworthy topics, to family and relationships. Make friends, share stories, and join the conversation.

Indie Lens Pop-Up screening: The Bad Kids 3/7

Join KLRU and the Austin Public Library for the Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the documentary The Bad Kids. This free event takes place Tuesday, March 7th, at 7 pm at the Austin Public Library Windsor Park Branch 5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723.

Vintage TV

Located in an impoverished Mojave Desert community, Black Rock Continuation High School is an alternative for at-risk students with little hope of graduating from a traditional high school. It’s their last chance. This coming of age story shows extraordinary educators and talented students combatting the crippling effects of poverty.

Indie Lens Pop-Up is a neighborhood series that brings people together for film screenings and community-driven conversations. Featuring documentaries seen on PBS’s Independent Lens, Indie Lens Pop-Up draws local residents, leaders and organizations to discuss what matters most, from newsworthy topics, to family and relationships. Make friends, share stories, and join the conversation.

Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of Meet the Patels 12/6

Join KLRU and the Austin Public Library for the Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the documentary Meet the Patels. This free event takes place Tuesday, Dec. 6th, at 7 pm at the Austin Public Library Windsor Park Branch 5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723.

meet-the-patelsRavi Patel is almost 30, an actor, and, worst of all to his traditional Hindu parents, still unmarried. After he breaks up with his white girlfriend, Ravi submits to his parents’ wishes and allows them to play matchmaker. The true-life romantic comedy Meet the Patels explores the influences of culture and identity on the most intense, personal, and important part of one’s life — love.

We’ll have guests from Indie Meme at the event to talk about that group’s work showcasing the best of South Asian indie cinema. They will be screening the film Island City on Dec. 4th at  Southwest Theaters in Austin. Get more details about that event

Indie Lens Pop-Up is a neighborhood series that brings people together for film screenings and community-driven conversations. Featuring documentaries seen on PBS’s Independent Lens, Indie Lens Pop-Up draws local residents, leaders and organizations to discuss what matters most, from newsworthy topics, to family and relationships. Make friends, share stories, and join the conversation.

Indie Lens Pop-Up Mimi and Dona 11/3

Join KLRU and the Austin Public Library for the Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the documentary Mimi and Dona. This free event takes place Tuesday, Nov. 3rd, at 7 p.m. at the Austin Public Library Windsor Park Branch 5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723.

Mimi_And_Dona

For 64 years, 92-year-old Mimi has cared for her daughter Dona, who has an intellectual disability, and now faces the inevitable: to find Dona a home. This alternately heartbreaking and heartwarming film by Mimi’s granddaughter tells the story of a quirky and deeply connected mother-daughter duo, and their effect on three generations of a Texas family.

Formerly known as Community Cinema, the long-running screening series has been renamed Indie Lens Pop-Up to strengthen the bond between the Independent Lens television series and local communities, and bring new energy and new audiences to the in-person events as well as online OVEE events and the broadcasts on KLRU. Over the past decade, screenings of Independent Lens films have brought more than 331,000 participants together at over 5,700 events to discuss issues that impact local communities.

Indie Lens Pop-Up Stray Dog 10/6

Join KLRU and the Austin Public Library for the Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the documentary Stray Dog. This free event takes place Tuesday, Oct. 6th, at 7 pm at the Austin Public Library Windsor Park Branch 5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723.

Stray_Dog

From the director of the Oscar-nominated Winter’s Bone comes this portrait of a motorcycle-riding Vietnam veteran. There’s much more to Ronnie “Stray Dog” Hall than meets the eye; behind the tattoos and leather vest is a man dedicated to helping his fellow vets and immigrant family as he also comes to terms with his combat experience.

Formerly known as Community Cinema, the long-running screening series has been renamed Indie Lens Pop-Up to strengthen the bond between the Independent Lens television series and local communities, and bring new energy and new audiences to the in-person events as well as online OVEE events and the broadcasts on KLRU. Over the past decade, screenings of Independent Lens films have brought more than 331,000 participants together at over 5,700 events to discuss issues that impact local communities.