KLRU

Over the air - 18.1
AT&T U-verse - 18 / 1018
Grande - 9 / 309
Spectrum - 9 / 1221
Direct TV - 18
Dish - 18
Google - 18
Suddenlink - 9 / 700
Northland - 11 / 402
CMA - 9 / 465

KLRU Create

Over the air - 18.2
Grande - 283
Spectrum - 1270
Google - 76
Suddenlink - 142

KLRU Q

Over the air - 18.3
Grande - 284
Spectrum - 20 / 1268
Google - 77
Suddenlink - 143

PBS Kids

Over the air - 18.4
Grande - 285
Spectrum - 1269
Google - 78
Suddenlink - 144

KLRU Schedule | NOVA | Killer Typhoon

It was the strongest cyclone to hit land in recorded history. On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan -- what some are calling "the perfect storm" -- slammed into the Philippines, whipping the low-lying and densely-populated islands with 200 mile-per-hour winds and sending a two-story-high storm surge flooding into homes, schools, and hospitals. It wiped villages off the map and devastated cities, including the hard-hit provincial capital Tacloban. Estimates count more than 5,000 dead and millions homeless. What made Haiyan so destructive? In-depth interviews with the meteorologists charged with tracking and forecasting Pacific storms take us inside the anatomy of the typhoon, tracking its progress from its start as a low-pressure area over Micronesia to its deadly landfall and revealing why the Pacific is such fertile ground for cyclones. But that's just part of the story of why this storm was so deadly. With crews on the ground within days of the storm, NOVA reveals how conditions dramatically deteriorated in the storm's aftermath, as impassable roads and shuttered gas stations paralyzed the critical relief effort, leaving lifesaving food, water, and medicine to pile up at the airport. Disaster preparedness experts and relief workers scramble to understand why the Philippines was so vulnerable when other countries, like India, have successfully slashed storm casualty counts in recent years. As climate change and sea level rise threaten millions of the world's most impoverished people with stronger, and perhaps more frequent, storms, how can we prepare for the next monster typhoon?

Visit the Website: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/

Episode #4106 / Length: 56 minutes


Related Video