currently in Austin




Oregano comes in all different types, varieties and cultivars. All are very drought tough and all require good drainage.

Oregano’s so easy to grow, even in a container, that you’ll never need to purchase it in the produce section ever again! Or buy dried out oregano!

On top of that, it makes a great groundcover and in fact, without an intervention, oregano will creep steadily across any garden bed that you plant it in. much the same as many of its other minty relatives. There’s no reason to isolate it in an official herb bed; include it as a groundcover to border walkways or accent beds.

Oregano spreads by rhizomes, and so it’s very easy to dig up a hunk of it and transplant it to another area of your garden, or to give to friends.

Some cultivars get much taller than others, so be sure to get the right one for your space.

Full sun is great, but a little shade is fine too. Oregano will do fine on once a week irrigation and performs best with a little organic matter in the soil.

In warmer winters it may remain evergreen but will still need to be sheared back all the way to the ground to encourage new growth in early spring.

Some cultivars flower easily, while others rarely do. But this plant is grown for its leaves, so you really don’t want it to flower anyway.

After vigorous spring growth, it’s a good idea to shear oregano back quite a bit, otherwise it tends to get leggy and flop over, which doesn’t hurt anything, it just doesn’t look too attractive.