menu

social

currently in Austin

the show

Healing Gardens for the Formerly Homeless

air date: November 18, 2017

Herbs can build the immune system or contribute antiviral and antibiotic therapy. Tiodoso Bustillo, Acupuncturist & Herbalist/Integrative Medicine from Baylor Scott & White, explores a few common and Asian herbs, when and how to take them, and when to avoid. Genesis Gardens at Community First! Village, a Mobile Loaves & Fishes planned community for the formerly homeless, grows good health along with dignity. Trisha shows how to grow, divide and harvest tasty perennial leeks. Daphne explains why an oak tree’s acorns are oozing sap and when to divide fall-blooming bulbs. Read the blog!

categories:

tags:

Episode Segments

On Tour

Formerly Homeless Growing Gardens & Community

Genesis Gardens at Community First! Village, a Mobile Loaves & Fishes planned community for the formerly homeless, grows good health along with dignity. When Alan Graham, found and CEO of Mobile Loaves & Fishes, set out to nourish body and soul, he expanded his vision to a vibrant homestead where community partners helped make it come true. Now, instead of fast food, residents nurture good organic food they grow themselves, eat fresh eggs from their chickens, and tend cheese-making goats

Watch more "On Tour" videos on YouTube →

Interview

Chinese Herbs for Health

Herbs can build the immune system or contribute antiviral and antibiotic therapy. Tiodoso Bustillo, Acupuncturist & Herbalist/Integrative Medicine from Baylor Scott & White, explores a few common and Asian herbs, when and how to take them, and when to avoid.

categories:

Watch more CTG Interview videos on YouTube →

Question of the Week

What’s this sap on my acorns?

Thanks to Keith Day for this great question about a sap-like substance oozing from acorns on his live oak tree! Butterflies, bees, and other insects are flocking to the sticky goo. It’s great for them, but is the tree okay?

Well, although I’ve seen many instances of trees oozing sap from the trunk and branches, I’ve never seen live oaks doing so only from the acorns.

One major reason for oozing sap is bacterial infections, which are not a good sign. If the oozing is limited to the acorns, the infection may be limited to that area, and if so, represents no long-term problem for the tree and requires no treatment.

These acorns will all fall from the tree soon, and then you should keep an eye out for any other areas of oozing sap. If you had in mind to do some pruning on your trees soon, be sure to hold off until the ideal time: deep in winter, when the trees aren’t actively growing and sap isn’t flowing. That would most likely be sometime in January, but watch the temperatures to be sure.

Note: pruning of live oaks should be avoided from February to July, especially if sap is evident on the trunk or branches!

Winter is not easy to predict these days, with most years much warmer than what we’ve traditionally considered “normal.” If you notice sap oozing from any other areas, you might have a bigger problem, and since bacterial infections are not curable, I would suggest having an arborist out for a visit to get an actual diagnosis and recommendations on how to proceed.

Watch more Question of the Week videos on YouTube →

Plant of the Week

Dividing Bulbs

Dividing Bulbs

Fall 2017 brought us a bumper crop of oxblood lilies and spiderlilies (Lycoris radiata). When should you divide them (or spring bulbs)? Anytime is fine, but the ideal time is when the leaves start to die back as they go dormant. But if you fear missing that, and want to find them easily, divide and move to new spots. Be sure the ground is moist and dig carefully around them so that you don’t slice them in the process! It’s best to divide opposite their blooming season. So: divide fall-bloomers in late fall/winter. Spring bulbs: divide late spring/summer. Some bulbs may not bloom the first year after division, but it’s worth the wait to spread them around and create new clusters!

tags:

Comments