Archive for the ‘herbs’ Category

Px3: Perennial, Pollinators, Powerful

Thursday, October 25th, 2012 Posted in Nurseries, Techniques, bees, birds, butterflies, cat cove, caterpillars, fall plants, garden design, groundcovers, herbs, lawn replace, native plants, wildlife | 11 Comments »

I absolutely fall for fall, when everything explodes at once! A few white-blooming 'Silverado' cenizo (Texas sage) flowers hooked up with re-blooming Iceberg roses and hot weather thryallis. White mistflower (Ageratina havanensis) will pop us a few flowers in spring, but ...

On tour with the Travis County Master Gardeners

Thursday, October 11th, 2012 Posted in Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, Techniques, Tours, cats, container gardens, fall plants, garden design, garden projects, herbs, lawn replace, master gardeners, native plants, wildflowers | 9 Comments »

How can you reduce lawn, combine edibles, flowers for wildlife, living spaces, and art? The best ideas come from fellow gardeners! That’s why you won’t want to miss the Travis County Master Gardeners’ “Inside Austin Gardens” tour on October 20. This ...

Fall in love with autumn bulbs and grasses

Thursday, September 27th, 2012 Posted in annuals, books, bulbs, companion plants, fall plants, fruit trees, garden design, herbs, lawn replace, native plants, recipes, wildflowers, wildlife | 6 Comments »

Big day in my garden! The autumn daffodils (Sternbergia lutea) popped up reliably a year after planting. These small crocus-like plants, native to the Mediterranean, are cute companions for red oxblood lilies and spider lilies (Lycoris radiata). Last fall on CTG, Chris ...

Keyhole gardens, Oak leaf galls, Gabriel Valley Farms, Drying herbs

Thursday, September 20th, 2012 Posted in Insects, Nurseries, bulbs, container gardens, crafts, drought, fall plants, herbs, keyhole gardens, native plants, trees, wildlife | 2 Comments »

First, I have to admit: I’m a bulb freak. I’d buy a thousand more if I could. Instead, I divide my naturalizing wealth and then forget where I planted them. That’s okay, because garden surprises like these oxblood lilies are ...