Archive for the ‘books’ Category

Why plants freeze|Greg Grant vegetables

Thursday, January 24th, 2013 Posted in Crinum lilies, Texas A&M, annuals, books, destinations, frost protection, fruit trees, garden structure, native plants, organic fertilizers, perennials | 2 Comments »

My crinums don’t look so hot right now. No problem: I simply cut off their mushy leaves and they’ll rebound pronto. Although things have been rather tame this winter, we’ve had our little cold spells. The top question goes to ...

Mushrooms: Your Garden’s Best Friend

Thursday, January 17th, 2013 Posted in Agave celsii, books, garden design, garden structure, habitat, lawn replace, mulch, native plants, pruning, shade plants, trees, wildlife, winter color | 4 Comments »

Remember last spring and fall when mushrooms appeared like magic? I always get a few, but last year, many mornings were absolute wonderland! Some gardeners fear that mushrooms mean something really evil. Actually, it’s just the opposite! Tom meets with Ashley McKenzie ...

Fall in love with autumn bulbs and grasses

Thursday, September 27th, 2012 Posted in annuals, books, bulbs, companion plants, fall plants, fruit trees, garden design, herbs, lawn replace, native plants, recipes, wildflowers, wildlife | 6 Comments »

Big day in my garden! The autumn daffodils (Sternbergia lutea) popped up reliably a year after planting. These small crocus-like plants, native to the Mediterranean, are cute companions for red oxblood lilies and spider lilies (Lycoris radiata). Last fall on CTG, Chris ...

Texas Tall Tales: insects, design, and a story for the whole family!

Thursday, June 28th, 2012 Posted in Insects, bees, books, butterflies, children, compost, garden design, native plants, roses | 4 Comments »

Texas doesn’t wimp around. We’re in a state of perpetual extremes: weather, flowering cycles, and insects. One giant you’re lucky to find in your compost pile are these guys, like in Daphne’s healthy compost bin. This week, Daphne introduces us to ...