Archive for the ‘vegetables’ Category

Projects! Reduce lawn makeover! Container vegetables!

Thursday, September 13th, 2012 Posted in Nurseries, Seeds, bees, butterflies, container gardens, deer, drought, fruit trees, garden bloggers, garden design, garden projects, lawn replace, native plants, trees, vegetables, wildlife | 6 Comments »

Revival! As the rock roses (Pavonia lasiopetala) and Turk’s cap swing back into gear, my ideas hit revival mode, too. Projects are finally in the works.  Last spring, we laid a sandstone path over a section of dead grass, but wanted ...

Garden Psychology: What Does Your Garden Say About You?

Thursday, July 19th, 2012 Posted in Insects, annuals, bees, butterflies, garden design, lawn replace, philosophy, recipes, vegetables | 14 Comments »

“Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are.” Alfred Austin Like our home’s interior, our gardens reflect our essential selves at truly ground level. What do our gardens say about us? Risk or safety (the gambler in ...

Structure + Soft = Powerful Designs

Thursday, June 14th, 2012 Posted in Nurseries, Summer plants, drought, garden bloggers, garden design, garden projects, native plants, passalong plants, plant propagation, shade plants, tomatoes, vegetables | 16 Comments »

Although I’m fond of tidy, highly structural gardens, mine doesn’t make that list. I do have many non-fussy anchors, but I wouldn’t be content with an essentially static garden. I’m a drama queen and I like surprises! This sure was ...

Cool plants for heat/pond tour to cool off your garden

Thursday, May 31st, 2012 Posted in Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, Tours, Zac Zamora, bees, butterflies, cats, daylilies, destinations, disease, drought, fountain, garden bloggers, garden design, lawn replace, native plants, ponds, tomatoes, vegetables, water features, water lilies, wildflowers, wildlife | 19 Comments »

Did you know that we have another native Texas hibiscus? I sure didn’t until I was at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center’s sale last fall and nabbed this Hibiscus martianus. It was tiny and possibly not cold-hardy, so I protected ...