Search Results for: Carla Jean Oldenkamp

Episodes

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Growing Olive Trees - October 31st, 2013

What’s really in your olive oil? Meet John Gambini from Texas Hill Country Olive Company, who grows organic olive trees and presses pure oil. On tour in Dripping Springs, Carla Jean Oldenkamp grows organic good eats for all, including the chickens in her Zen Hen House. Daphne flavors things up with homegrown dill. Plus, find out why your xeric plants rotted in recent rains. John divides nursery chard transplants for more “yums”…

garden carla jean oldenkamp

Funky Chicken Coop Tour 2012 - February 25th, 2012

Get egg-citing tips to raise chickens of your own with Michelle Hernandez and Carla Jean Oldenkamp from the Austin Funky Chicken Coop tour. Take a tour of Carla‘s Zen Hen House and organic vegetable garden. Daphne Richards notes when to fertilize plants and lawn. Her pick of the week: Texas maroon bluebonnet. Trisha Shirey transitions winter crops to summer’s harvests….

Other Search Results

Native companions

…rs to go to seed for small birds that will swoop in. Natives join the not-so-native for me. Jenny Stocker’s garden is my dream of the compatible blend. Oh, recently we taped it again, this time in HD, coming your way in early 2014. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center’s annual Gardens on Tour is the super duper way to pick up design and native plant combinations to try at home. This week, Tom joins Andrea DeLong-Amaya from the Wildflower Cent…

Filling up on fragrance|Funky Chicken Coop tour|Square foot garden design

…is about all they’ll get from me. Are you ready for garden tours? How about one that features chickens, too?! This week, Tom meets with Michelle Hernandez and Carla Jean Oldenkamp from the Austin Funky Chicken tour for a 2012 preview and tips for starting a brood of your own. Mark the date: April 7. It’s only $10 for a map to all the coops (so, a group can go for $10)! Here’s a sneak preview of one of them: Carla Jean Oldenkamp’s Zen Hen H…

Winter drought care trees & wildflowers|Edibles meet perennials

Happy New Year! Good wishes to you all that 2013 sprinkles us with abundant joy. Unless we get a few serious sprinkles from above, we need to water our wildflower rosettes, like bluebonnets. Thanks to Jean Warner for Daphne’s question this week! Like Jean, my bluebonnets are up, along with larkspur and weeds—so be careful out there when pulling. If you make a mistake like I have “now and then,” quickly plug the keeper back in and water. Here a…

Augie doggie doo in compost? Dillo Dirt? This week CTG, really.

Well, golly. Did I ever mess up. I guess that’s appropriate, considering this super question! For real, this week on CTG, Daphne answers Jean Wucher’s question about using doggie doo in the compost pile. I got ahead of myself and posted Joan’s rose question instead. Actually, it’s  good timing, since I know you’re thinking about your roses. But that one airs February 12! Jean’s question is perfect timing too,…

From the producer: November 14, 2008

…’ a few years ago. It’s a late summer and fall bloomer, with tiny little flowers that I can’t seem to get in focus, and dies back in winter.  In spring, it returns, fluffier and hardier than ever (now about 2′ tall). I have it in the crepe bed where it gets some sun, but shade a lot of the day. On the crepe bed, here’s its latest rendition at the right side. I thank gardener Walt Krueger for telling me about the …

Not taking natives for granted

How soon we take things for granted! These days, it’s easy to find spring-blooming native columbines and their spin-offs. I have so many intermingled, but this is an Aquiliegia chrysantha of some sort. Not so long ago, the only columbines we could buy were foreigners that croaked in 12 seconds. My first ones that worked were simply called  “Hinckley columbine” in the days that these native Texans were first coming into the…