Search Results for: April Hendricks

Episodes

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Time to Plant Trees - October 26th, 2013

Tree loss is at record numbers. April Rose from TreeFolks explains how drought impacts our trees over the long term, how we can help, and good choices for replacements. On tour in San Antonio’s historic King William district, visit a drought-tough makeover that started with tree renovation. Daphne explains how to properly mulch trees to avoid causing problems. Her pick of the week is Chinkapin oak, a trustworthy oak for smaller gardens.  Trisha…

garden visual

Backyard Citrus and Small Fruits - April 20th, 2013

Pluck luscious homegrown citrus with Michelle Pfluger’s tips from Green ‘n Growing. On tour in Liberty Hill, April and Cliff Hendricks found their paradise with wide open land and close-up gardens. Daphne answers: How long does it really take for a century plant to bloom? Her pick of the week is agaves. John Dromgoole shows how to water plants with ollas….

Resources

Cucumber growing

by Trisha Shirey Cucumbers are pretty easy to grow. They do have very long vines, so you’ll want to have a sturdy trellis for them. I find that they do really well on my 4 x 4 livestock panel fencing mounted on T-posts. The cucumbers climb up with their own tendrils. But there are space saver types, cucumbers that you can grow in containers. Look for bush varieties in your growing area. Cucumbers want sun and warm, fertile soil to grow. Start s…

Other Search Results

Things to do in April

Fertilize: Tomatoes and peppers should be fed with a liquid fertilizer. Feed crape myrtle beneath the branch spread with 1/3 cup complete fertilizer per sq. yd. After second mowing, fertilize lawn with 3-1-2 ratio product; aerate first, if needed. Fertilize all houseplants with complete fertilizer. Mulch trees, shrubs, vegetable garden and flower beds (after soil has warmed) with 2-4 inches of mulch. Pine needles and oak leave…

Fruits of our labors even if some took “almost” a century

…at their cold hardiness. I fell in love with an A. celsii ‘Tricolor’, as it was called then, which is rated for a zone or two just warmer than us. First crazy freeze and they were mush. My regular celsii didn’t fare well in 17 degrees but did return, just slightly modified. Do take a serious look at their mature size, too. This cute little A. americana will grow up fast, and it won’t take even 10 years! Event note: The Cactus & Succulent…

Tips

Monthly Tips January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December…

Young voices for our future

…orrow, as is Urban Roots. Linda Agriculture Shapes Young Lives By Colleen Nelson An East Austin farm uses sustainable agriculture to help transform the lives of young people in the community. Urban Roots takes on a group of 14 to 17 year old interns every spring to help urge growth during each stage of the farming process. The Core Youth Program’s goal is to  give teens real world work experience through the agriculture business. Blake Hill, fa…

Obsessed With Fascinating Plants

Plants fascinate me! With no internet connection whatsoever, they know exactly what to do when the time is right. My Byzantine gladiolus corms  always greet winter with tidy upright leaves.  They time their vivid flowers for April to make sure we notice them in spring madness. Usually the larkspurs hang around to join them. The cat cove rose arbor is a little out of control. I’ll tame it after I get my quota of homegrown perfume. When I pl…

From the producer: April 9, 2009

What a find for this week’s show!  Last October, we taped Lana and Robert Beyer’s garden, a huge departure from the one they had in Houston.  Robert is a passionate collector and ready to try anything once.  Lana attempts to keep it under control with an eye to design. The result is absolutely fabulous.  Also, check out Robert’s website and blog, truly essential plant references from a hands-on guy who learned Central Texas gar…

From the producer: April 23, 2009

Although I count on fellow gardeners for new plant ideas, I also rely on them for design and how-to tips. You can call this “stealing” or “sharing!” But I’ve never met a gardener who wasn’t thrilled to provide step-by-step details of their handiwork. Then someone “steals” my rendition, gives it a personal twist, and someone else “steals” that.  It’s a fabulous passalong tradition….