Meet The Stanton Family

What do science lessons and family bonding have in common? For Patrick, Lucinda and Naomi Stanton, the connection comes from their time together at the Ruff Ruffman Family & Community Learning workshop.

The Stantons participated in this four week series along with other area families. Designed to spark STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) interest in young children, the workshop also empowers parents like Patrick and Lucinda to support their child’s education both at school and home.

“With the four weeks of science projects and doing things and meeting different people, Naomi learned a lot. It was awesome!” Patrick’s observation of his daughter’s time at the Ruff Ruffman workshop is a testament to what a valuable experience these sessions are for kids and parents alike.

Low-income and underserved households are often less equipped to address learning gaps. KLRU’s collaboration with key community partners addresses critical needs in early education by presenting lessons through play and hands-on activities. Research-based, engaging outreach to Central Texas families provides practical tools that these participants can continue to utilize well beyond the workshop.

Miriam Mendoza, KLRU’s Project Director for Ready To Learn says “I just like those little moments where the parent realizes ‘Wow, my child can learn through playing and I can be a part of that.’”

Each session starts with a meal, giving the adults the chance to talk and connect with neighbors who also have young families. Spending quality time with neighbors expands the support network for all these parents, which in turn supports all the children in their STEM progress.

Lucinda was particularly excited about the PBS KIDS Playtime Pad Naomi received after graduating from Ruff Ruffman. “It has a lot of learning apps: reading, drawing, spelling. It’s helping her to get more familiar with computers because they use them at school. And it actually helped me out too.” For some families, this is the first device they’ve brought home. This access lets kids hone technology skills and engage in creative, thoughtful play.

The Stantons gained the confidence at our Family & Community Learning workshop to tackle hands-on engineering projects together. KLRU’s Ready To Learn promotes early learning and school readiness while striving to build a more informed and connected Central Texas. And from Naomi’s smiles, this is just the first of many exciting STEM discoveries that she’ll make with her parents there to cheer her on.

“We’re thankful for the educational workshops KLRU provides in the community.”

                                                                                                        – The Stanton Family————————————————————————

Do you value KLRU? Find out how to help at klru.org.value

Family & Community Learning (FCL) workshops are part of the Community Collaboratives for Early Learning and Media (CC-ELM) project through the Ready to Learn (RTL) initiative funded by the U.S. Department of Education and administered by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS.

          

Get to know KLRU’s early childhood community partners: Thinkery, Communities In Schools of Central Texas and Boys & Girls Clubs of the Austin Area. These local organizations are essential to the success of our workshops! They recruit families like the Stantons, they provide the space and their staff lead instruction.

Check out additional information about KLRU’s time at the Ruff Ruffman camp.

Read more about KLRU’s involvement with Ready To Learn (RTL) and Family & Community Learning (FCL).

“KLRU is a community in the virtual space.”

Amy Wong Mok of the Asian American Cultural Center believes that media doesn’t have to be divisive. As a KLRU board member, she’s proud to support programming that lives up to her values.

“I like to use [as an] acronym: the Chinese chi,” she says. “Throughout KLRU or PBS programming, they have these three characters, civility, humanity and integrity.”

In fact, the need for civil, trustworthy reporting led to the creation of KLRU’s Decibel earlier this year. In addition to national PBS news and public affairs programs, KLRU knows local audiences also want to watch local stories.

Hosted by Judy Maggio, Decibel produces television specials and short videos that help connect viewers to complex local issues while highlighting the real people whose lives are impacted by current events.

Amy says this kind of reporting can actually help strengthen rather than divide—because the community can’t grow until people really see, hear and feel the things that lead others to think differently.

“I think diversity can only enrich our life,” Amy says. “[KLRU] is a community in the virtual space, and I think it’s very important.”

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Do you value KLRU? Find out how to help. http://www.klru.org/value/

We’d love to hear from you! Follow the link and let us know what #YourKLRU and PBS stories are. You might just be our next featured viewer.

“KLRU programming was essential in forming my art.”

Local artist Hakeem Adewumi has been a creator for a long time, but he started out as another viewer like you.

“I grew up on PBS KIDS,” Hakeem tells KLRU. “I think all my friends did.”

Hakeem also distinctly recalls watching a civil rights program on KLRU that hit him hard, capturing a long history of racism and resistance.

“I really used that moment and experience,” he says. “I carry that with me to curate my art, to start talking about the importance of inclusivity and diversity and race, Black history and Black culture.”

Hakeem’s work has taken him all over the world, tracing the roots and pathways of the African diaspora. Last year, a KLRU documentary team followed Hakeem and collaborating artists for an episode of the original KLRU series Arts In Context.

Almost exactly a year ago, the episode premiered on PBS stations all over the country.

It’s something of a full circle for Hakeem: once, KLRU programming inspired and influenced him as an artist. Now, in turn, his story has become part of KLRU’s mission: to share history, art, culture and community with audiences near and far.

“My art is always with a Black lens, it’s always my perspective. But my goal at the end of the day is to always build community,” Hakeem says. “And that platform has been shared widely on KLRU. I’m super grateful for that.”

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Do you value KLRU? Find out how to help. http://www.klru.org/value/

We’d love to hear from you! Follow the link and let us know what #YourKLRU and PBS stories are. You might just be our next featured viewer.

“I am still a PBS Kid.”

As Jessica Michallick recently told KLRU, being visually impaired meant missing out on certain experiences, when she was in school.

“I didn’t get to participate in the science fair,” she recalls. “I didn’t get a chance to do experiments in school.”

It’s no surprise that this memory still stands out to her. One of Jessica’s favorite shows at the time was Bill Nye the Science Guy on her local PBS station.

“[It] just gave me such interest in science. I would do little experiments at home. My parents would always find weird things that I was freezing to see what would happen to them.”

At school, Jessica also experienced bullying from other students, but another PBS favorite, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, provided a sense of acceptance and belonging.

“[Mister Rogers] did a song called ‘It’s You I Like’ . . . I felt like he was really my friend. Like I would communicate with him through the TV.”

Like Jessica, many of us still remember exactly how it felt to be bullied as kids—even decades after the fact. Furthermore, as parents, many of us are now guiding our own children through struggles with bullying.

Jessica is a member of KLRU today because she knows firsthand that PBS provides space for all children to feel care and respect—and to learn how to deal with differences.

Parents can count on KLRU for children’s media that communicates empathy and builds self-esteem—all without advertising. In fact, parents continue to rate PBS KIDS as the most trusted and safe channel for children to watch. Read more about how PBS KIDS benefits children and parents. And PBS KIDS is now available 24/7!

Today, Jessica is all grown up, but she hasn’t forgotten what a difference these programs made in her life.

“I am still a ‘PBS Kid,’ ” she says.

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Do you value KLRU? Find out how to help. http://www.klru.org/value/

We’d love to hear from you! Follow the link and let us know what #YourKLRU and PBS stories are. You might just be our next featured viewer.