PBS 2016 Online Film Festival


For the past four years the PBS Online Film Festival has delivered some of the most powerful and engaging stories from filmmakers across the country. Now, attracting more than 1.5 million video stream in its first four years as well as nominations in the Webby Awards, PBS will return for a fifth year on July 11-29, 2016.

Since its launch in 2012, the PBS Online Film Festival has featured diverse films from PBS member stations and ITVS and POV. Starting July 11, viewers can once again watch, vote and share their favorites. This year’s festival includes collaborations with a wide variety of public television producers, including the Center for Asian American Media, Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB), National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC), Pacific Islanders in Communications (PIC), Wisconsin Media Lab and Vision Maker Media.

Beginning July 11, the festival will be available via PBS and station digital platforms, including PBS.org, YouTube and PBS social media channels. All 25 independent films will also be available via the PBS app on iOS, Android, Apple TV, Roku and FireTV devices.

Viewers are encouraged to watch, share and vote for their favorite film by going to: pbs.org/filmfestival. The film with the most votes will receive the “PBS People’s Choice” award. Additionally, for the first time ever, viewers can vote for their favorite film by logging onto their Facebook or Twitter account and sharing their favorite film titles using the #PBSolff. For updates on the festival, follow #PBSolff on Twitter.

KLRU has three local films competing this year: The Superlative Light, Peppermint and The Scar.


The Superlative Light
by Ben Steinbauer
Documentary photographer, Robert Shults, went from being a homeless
dreamer to a home-owning artist after taking photos of the brightest
light source in the known universe, a laser in basement of the physics
department at The University of Texas.

by Jay Hubert
6-year-old Samantha must convince her father to take her favorite pet
with them as they move away from their Texas farm.

The Scar
by Brittney Shepherd
Confined by the oppressive summer heat, a single-minded mother, and
the limits of girlhood, a young girl’s outing to the corner store
stirs an unexpected self-realization.



Introducing the Independent Lens Documentary Club on Twitter

From our friends at Independent Lens:

This week we’re debuting our brand new Independent Lens Documentary Club! Let’s get together to discuss this week’s film, Wham Bam Islam!, other documentary films, and whatever else you feel like talking about with us.

Here’s how it works: Wham Bam Islam! is premiering Thursday at 9 PM. While you watch, or after you’ve watched, fire up Twitter and start tweeting about the film using the hashtag #ILDocClub. (It helps to be following us, too: @IndependentLens).

More information at their blog: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/blog/introducing-the-independent-lens-documentary-club-on-twitter