Science Night November 26

Don’t miss three Nature specials for this week’s Science Night on KLRU.

First at 8 pm, Nature brings you My Life As A Turkey. After a local farmer left a bowl of eggs on Joe Hutto’s front porch, his life was forever changed. Hutto, possessing a broad background in the natural sciences and an interest in imprinting young animals, incubated the eggs and waited for them to hatch. As the chicks emerged from their shells, they locked eyes with an unusual but dedicated mother.

Masters of the water and air, they have conquered the globe. From deft dabblers to great divers, these are one of the Animal Kingdom’s ultimate athletes. Take a fascinating look at one of our most familiar birds on An Original DUCKumentary at 8 pm.

From our kitchen windows we spot them, nibbling away at our gardens and shrubs. They wander along our highways, reminders of the wilderness we have paved our way through. From coast to coast some 30 million white-tailed deer make their home in the United States. But once they retreat from our view, where do they go? What secrets do they carry back into the forest, away from our prying eyes? Working with scientists, special camera equipment, and deer experts and devotees of every kind, The Private Life of Dear at 9 pm reveals the hidden world of white-tailed deer in a whole new light.

Science Night November 19

Entertaining science only on KLRU every Wednesday evening starting at 7!

Starting the night off is a Nature special: A remarkable new story is unfolding in the Arctic, one that has never been told before. In the last few years, scientists have started noting an ever-growing number of killer whales in Arctic waters in the summer months. More and more have been attracted to these huge hunting grounds by the growing expanses of open water. And they are attacking exactly the same prey animals as the polar bears: seals, narwhal, belugas and bowhead whales.

On NOVA at 8 pm, in less than two minutes in March, a one-square-mile field of debris slammed into the Washington state community of Oso, killing 41 and destroying nearly 50 homes. Drawing on analysis of other recent landslides around the world, geologists are investigating what triggered the deadliest U.S. landslide in decades and whether climate change is increasing the risk of similar disasters around the globe.

On November 11, billions of kilometers from Earth, a spacecraft orbiter and lander will do what no other has dared to attempt: land on the volatile surface of a comet as it zooms around the sun at 67, 000 km/hr. If successful, it could help peer into our past and unlock secrets of our origins on To Catch a Comet at 9 pm.

Science Night November 12

Wednesday begging at 7 pm on Nature, the beaver, more than any other animal, is responsible for creating fertile landscapes across North America, but it hasn’t gotten much recognition for that accomplishment until now. A growing number of scientists, conservationists and grass-roots environmentalists have come to regard beavers as overlooked tools in reversing the effects of global warming and world-wide water shortages.

In central China, a vast underground mausoleum conceals a life-size terracotta army of cavalry, infantry, horses, chariots, weapons, administrators, acrobats, and musicians, all built to serve China’s first emperor, Qin Shi Huang Di, in the afterlife. NOVA at 8 pm reveals the secrets of one of archaeology’s greatest discoveries and brings to life the startlingly sophisticated world of Qin’s legendary empire.

Imagine a world without the power to capture or transmit sound. Journey with Steve Johnson on How We Got to Now at 9 pm to the Arcy sur Cure caves in northern France, where he finds the first traces of the desire to record sound – 10, 000 years ago. He also learns about the difference that radio made in the civil rights movement and discovers that telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell thought that the best use for his invention was long-distance jam sessions. During an ultrasound on a pregnant dolphin, he realizes just how big a role sound has played in medicine. The unsung heroes of sound have had an impact on our working lives, race relations, saving lives and the radical alteration of cities.

Science Night November 5

Education and entertainment come together for KLRU’s Science Night every Wednesday beginning at 7 pm.

Nature starts the evening off. Sloths, once largely ignored, have become a hot topic of scientific researchers. Sanctuaries and rehabilitation centers are also springing up, as development often displaces these gentle creatures. Filmed in Panama, Costa Rica and Colombia, this is a story of friendship between a journalist and the sloth she named Velcro and a network of people working to learn more about sloths in order to protect them.

Almost a century ago, paleontologists found the first tantalizing hints of a monster even bigger than Tyrannosaurus Rex, perhaps the largest predator ever to walk the Earth: spectacular fossil bones from a dinosaur dubbed Spinosaurus. Bringing together experts in paleontology, geology, climatology and paleobotany, this NOVA/National Geographic special at 8 pm brings to life the lost world over which Spinosaurus reigned more than 65 million years ago.

Finally on How We Got to Now with Steve Johnson at 9 pm, only in the last 200 years have humans learned how to make things cold. Johnson explains how ice entrepreneur Frederic Tudor made ice delivery the second biggest export business in the U.S. and visits the place where Clarence Birdseye, the father of the frozen food industry, experienced his eureka moment. He also travels to Dubai to see how mastery of cold has led to penguins in the desert. From IVF to food, politics and Hollywood to human migration, the unsung heroes of cold have led the way.

Science Night October 29

In the frigid valleys of Japan’s Shiga Highlands, a troop of snow monkeys make their way and raise their families in a complex society of rank and privilege where each knows their place. With their confident leader to guide them and their families to shelter and care for them, this troop of snow monkeys is ready to face the world on Nature | Snow Monkeys Wednesday at 7 pm.

When World War I began in 1914, pilots occasionally took pot shots at one another with rifles; however, the fighter had become an efficient killing machine. NOVA | First Air War Wednesday at 8 pm joins a team as they uncover the secrets of some of aviation’s most colorful and deadly early flying machines and explores how their impact played a key role in the nightmare slaughter of the Western Front.

Whether changing our genetic make-up, altering the world’s sleeping patterns, transforming architecture, taking us into space or triggering one of the great social reforms in American history, the pioneers of light have made themselves indispensable throughout human history all on How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson | Light Wednesday at 9 pm.

Science Night October 22

Crows do not have the best of reputations, but their image is about to take a real turn in Nature | A Murder of Crows Wednesday at 7 pm. New research has shown they are among the most intelligent animals in the world, able to use tools as only elephants and chimpanzees do, able to recognize each other’s voices and 250 distinct calls. They are very social, mate for life and raise their young for up to five years. And they are able to recognize individual humans and pick them out of a crowd up to two years later.

The first stage in the adventure of human flight began with daring inventors and aeronauts in 18th-century Paris, where a handful of brilliant and colorful pioneers developed all the essential features of today’s hot air and gas balloons. Their exploits fascinated Benjamin Franklin, who was serving in Paris as the American ambassador. To explore this burst of innovation, NOVA | Ben Franklin’s Balloons Wednesday at 8 pm recreates the thrilling and daunting prospect that the balloon pioneers faced as they left Earth for the first time.

On How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson Wednesday at 9 pm, Johnson considers how the invention of the mirror gave rise to the Renaissance, how glass lenses allow us to reveal worlds within worlds and how, deep beneath the ocean, glass is essential to communication. The link between the worlds of art, science, astronomy, disease prevention and global communication starts with the little-known maverick innovators of glass.

Science Night October 15

Alongside the fastest, strongest, smartest animals are nature’s misfits, odd, bizarre and unlikely creatures that at first glance seem ill-equipped for survival. Left at the starting line in the race for life, these are the apparent losers in the story of evolution, yet somehow they manage to cling to life and in some cases even thrive. Nature | Animal Misfits Wednesday at 7 pm reveals some surprising details about how evolution really works, demonstrating that all animals are remarkably well-adapted to their chosen way of life.

Dirty water has killed more humans than all the wars of history combined, but in the last 150 years, a series of radical ideas, extraordinary innovations have changed our world. On How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson | Clean Wednesday at 8 pm, it’s not only about the world becoming a cleaner place – the iPhone, the subway, flat screen TVs and even the bikini are the result of the valiant efforts of the unsung heroes of clean.

The world today is obsessed by time. On How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson | Time Wednesday at 9 pm, learn how advancements in navigation, the way we work, technology and travel would have been impossible without the unsung heroes of time.

Science Night October 8

On Penguins: Spy in the Huddle | Growing Up Wednesday at 7 pm, penguin chicks become increasingly independent, and emperor and rockhopper parents place them in a creche and go fishing. Emperor chicks go skating, while rockhopper chicks practice their jumping skills. Eventually all the chicks leave for the sea, tackling the same hazards as their parents before them, from sea lions to predatory birds, high cliffs to glaciers.

 

The disappearance of Flight MH370 stunned the world. In an era of smart-phones and GPS, how could a 270-ton passenger jet vanish into thin air? It was a rude awakening for all of us, showing just how far we are from the world we imagined we lived in – in which every move is monitored all the time. NOVA | Why Planes Vanish Wednesday at 8 pm tells the inside story of the search for Flight MH370 and meets the key players, from all corners of the globe, who have spent months searching for the lost plane.

To protect occupied Europe from an Allied invasion, Hitler demanded the construction of a defensive wall stretching thousands of kilometers from France in the south to Norway in the north. Nazi Mega Weapons | Atlantic Wall Wednesday at 9 pm is the story of how this vast engineering project sucked in huge quantities of raw materials and men from all over the Third Reich … and faced its ultimate test on D-Day.

Science Night October 1

A team of archaeologists, engineers, woodworkers and horse trainers join forces to build and test two highly accurate replicas of Egyptian royal chariots on Nova | Building Pharoah’s Chariot Wednesday at 8 pm. They discover astonishingly advanced features, including spoked wheels, springs, shock absorbers, anti-roll bars and even a convex shaped rear mirror, leading one of them to compare the level of design to the engineering standards of 1930′s-era Buicks! By driving our pair of replicas to their limits in the desert outside Cairo, NOVA’s experts test the claim that the chariot marks a crucial turning point in ancient military history.

On Penguins: Spy in the Huddle Wednesday at 7 pm, newborn emperor penguins in Antarctica are caught walking on their mothers’ feet and taking their own first unsteady steps. In the Falklands, rockhopper chicks meet their unruly and predatory neighbors while eggcams provide unique views of the colony. In Peru, Humboldt chicks take on fur seals and take aim at gulls.

Around 800 BC, Kush, a little-known subject state of Egypt, rose up and conquered Egypt, enthroned its own Pharaohs and ruled for nearly 100 years. Find out more about this unlikely chapter of history that has been buried by the Egyptians and belittled by early archaeologists on Rise of the Black Pharoahs Wednesday at 9 pm. Now, in the heart of Sudan, archeologists are finding indisputable evidence of an advanced African society with powerful armies, vast reach and spiritually-driven imperial aspirations to rival the Egyptians’.

Science Night September 24

Penguins cross treacherous, frozen seas and avoid dangerous predators to reach their breeding grounds. The hard work for all the penguins finally pays off when their tiny, vulnerable chicks begin to hatch. Follow their journey on Penguins: A Nature Special Wednesday at 7 pm.

Our lives are going digital. We shop, bank and even date online. NOVA | Rise of the Hackers Wednesday at 8 pm investigates how a new global geek squad is harnessing cutting-edge science — all to stay one step ahead of the hackers and keep our data safe.

In Secrets of the Dead Wednesday at 9 pm a group of amateur historians test the bones of King Richard III, hunchbacked, with an arrow through the spine. Richard is considered the most evil king to have ruled England – and a fearsome warrior as well, despite the extreme curvature of his spine. Now, scientists are examining the bones to find out more about the king.