Science Night December 24

Every Wednesday on KLRU is Science Night. Don’t miss this week’s programming beginning at 7 pm!

Nature  The Himalayas
The Himalayan mountain system is the planet’s highest and home to the world’s highest peaks. Nature explores the diversity of wildlife and habitats of this mountain chain starring the mysterious snow leopard.

NOVA Building the Great Cathedrals at 8 pm


Carved from 100 million pounds of stone, soaring effortlessly atop a spiderweb of masonry, Gothic cathedrals are marvels of human achievement and artistry. But how did medieval builders reach such spectacular heights? Consuming the labor of entire towns, sometimes taking 100 years to build, these architectural marvels were crafted from just hand tools and stone. Many now teeter on the brink of catastrophic collapse. To save them, an international team of engineers, architects, art historians and computer scientists searches the naves, bays, and bell towers for clues to how the dream of these heavenly temples on earth came true. NOVA’s teams perform hands-on experiments to investigate and reveal the architectural secrets that the cathedral builders used to erect their soaring, glass-filled walls. This program reveals the hidden formulas, drawn from the pages of the Bible itself, that drove medieval builders ever upward.

 

NOVA  Great Cathedral Mystery at 9 pm

The Duomo in Florence is a towering masterpiece of Renaissance ingenuity and an enduring source of mystery. A team of U.S. master bricklayers help build a unique experimental “mini-Duomo” using period tools and techniques. Will it stay intact during the final precarious stages of closing over the top of the dome?

Science Night December 17

Science Night on KLRU begins at 7 pm Wednesday evening. Here’s a quick look at the exciting programs set for Wednesday:

Elsa’s Legacy: The Born Free Story

“Born Free” – a book and then a film that changed forever the way we think about wildlife, marked its 50th anniversary of the publication in 2010. What has happened to lions since this story? And what has happened to the people featured in the film? What has “Born Free” taught us?

 

NOVA | Making Stuff Wilder at 8 pm


David Pogue explores bold innovations inspired by the Earth’s greatest inventor, life itself. From underwater wi-fi based on dolphin communication, to robotic “mules” and “cheetahs” for the military, to swarms of robotic bees, Pogue travels the world seeing the “wildest” ideas put into action in new inventions and technologies. It is a journey that sees today’s bacteria turned into tomorrow’s metallurgists, viruses building batteries, and even DNA, the Code of Life, put to work in “living” computers. Will the stuff of the future take on a life of its own?

 

NOVA | Making Stuff Colder at 9 pm


For centuries we’ve fought it, shunned it and huddled against it. Cold has always been the enemy of life, but now it may hold the key to a new generation of science and technology that will improve our lives. David Pogue explores the frontiers of cold science, from saving the lives of severe trauma patients and cooling a warming planet to ultracold physics, where bizarre new properties of matter are the norm and the basis of new technologies like levitating trains and quantum computers. In this brave new world, cold isn’t to be avoided. Cold is the new hot.

Science Night December 3

science-night

Every Wednesday night KLRU hosts Science Night. It’s educational fun for the entire family starting at 7 pm!

Celebrate the natural world with Nature’s Best of Birds at 7 catalogue pledge special featuring some of the most memorable bird scenes from Nature’s award-winning library. Included in the special will be excerpts from fan favorites like My Life as a Turkey, An Original DUCKumentary, Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air, Raptor Force, Birds of the Gods, Ireland’s Wild River and more.

When Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon, he won instant fame. Yet this accomplished engineer and test pilot was so determined to stay out of the limelight that few know the personal story of how his rare combination of talent, luck and experience led to his successful command of Apollo 11. Nova | First Man on the Moon at 8 pm presents an intimate portrait of an unassuming American hero through interviews with Armstrong’s family and friends.

In Great Railway Journeys of Europe at 9:30 pm, Historian and archetypal Englishman Julian Davidson travels from the frozen wastes of Norway to the sunny shores of the Italian Adriatic coast, sampling the delights of some of the most dramatic and fascinating railway journeys in Europe.

Science Night November 26

Don’t miss three Nature specials for this week’s Science Night on KLRU.

First at 8 pm, Nature brings you My Life As A Turkey. After a local farmer left a bowl of eggs on Joe Hutto’s front porch, his life was forever changed. Hutto, possessing a broad background in the natural sciences and an interest in imprinting young animals, incubated the eggs and waited for them to hatch. As the chicks emerged from their shells, they locked eyes with an unusual but dedicated mother.

Masters of the water and air, they have conquered the globe. From deft dabblers to great divers, these are one of the Animal Kingdom’s ultimate athletes. Take a fascinating look at one of our most familiar birds on An Original DUCKumentary at 8 pm.

From our kitchen windows we spot them, nibbling away at our gardens and shrubs. They wander along our highways, reminders of the wilderness we have paved our way through. From coast to coast some 30 million white-tailed deer make their home in the United States. But once they retreat from our view, where do they go? What secrets do they carry back into the forest, away from our prying eyes? Working with scientists, special camera equipment, and deer experts and devotees of every kind, The Private Life of Dear at 9 pm reveals the hidden world of white-tailed deer in a whole new light.

Science Night November 19

Entertaining science only on KLRU every Wednesday evening starting at 7!

Starting the night off is a Nature special: A remarkable new story is unfolding in the Arctic, one that has never been told before. In the last few years, scientists have started noting an ever-growing number of killer whales in Arctic waters in the summer months. More and more have been attracted to these huge hunting grounds by the growing expanses of open water. And they are attacking exactly the same prey animals as the polar bears: seals, narwhal, belugas and bowhead whales.

On NOVA at 8 pm, in less than two minutes in March, a one-square-mile field of debris slammed into the Washington state community of Oso, killing 41 and destroying nearly 50 homes. Drawing on analysis of other recent landslides around the world, geologists are investigating what triggered the deadliest U.S. landslide in decades and whether climate change is increasing the risk of similar disasters around the globe.

On November 11, billions of kilometers from Earth, a spacecraft orbiter and lander will do what no other has dared to attempt: land on the volatile surface of a comet as it zooms around the sun at 67, 000 km/hr. If successful, it could help peer into our past and unlock secrets of our origins on To Catch a Comet at 9 pm.

Science Night November 12

Wednesday begging at 7 pm on Nature, the beaver, more than any other animal, is responsible for creating fertile landscapes across North America, but it hasn’t gotten much recognition for that accomplishment until now. A growing number of scientists, conservationists and grass-roots environmentalists have come to regard beavers as overlooked tools in reversing the effects of global warming and world-wide water shortages.

In central China, a vast underground mausoleum conceals a life-size terracotta army of cavalry, infantry, horses, chariots, weapons, administrators, acrobats, and musicians, all built to serve China’s first emperor, Qin Shi Huang Di, in the afterlife. NOVA at 8 pm reveals the secrets of one of archaeology’s greatest discoveries and brings to life the startlingly sophisticated world of Qin’s legendary empire.

Imagine a world without the power to capture or transmit sound. Journey with Steve Johnson on How We Got to Now at 9 pm to the Arcy sur Cure caves in northern France, where he finds the first traces of the desire to record sound – 10, 000 years ago. He also learns about the difference that radio made in the civil rights movement and discovers that telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell thought that the best use for his invention was long-distance jam sessions. During an ultrasound on a pregnant dolphin, he realizes just how big a role sound has played in medicine. The unsung heroes of sound have had an impact on our working lives, race relations, saving lives and the radical alteration of cities.

Science Night November 5

Education and entertainment come together for KLRU’s Science Night every Wednesday beginning at 7 pm.

Nature starts the evening off. Sloths, once largely ignored, have become a hot topic of scientific researchers. Sanctuaries and rehabilitation centers are also springing up, as development often displaces these gentle creatures. Filmed in Panama, Costa Rica and Colombia, this is a story of friendship between a journalist and the sloth she named Velcro and a network of people working to learn more about sloths in order to protect them.

Almost a century ago, paleontologists found the first tantalizing hints of a monster even bigger than Tyrannosaurus Rex, perhaps the largest predator ever to walk the Earth: spectacular fossil bones from a dinosaur dubbed Spinosaurus. Bringing together experts in paleontology, geology, climatology and paleobotany, this NOVA/National Geographic special at 8 pm brings to life the lost world over which Spinosaurus reigned more than 65 million years ago.

Finally on How We Got to Now with Steve Johnson at 9 pm, only in the last 200 years have humans learned how to make things cold. Johnson explains how ice entrepreneur Frederic Tudor made ice delivery the second biggest export business in the U.S. and visits the place where Clarence Birdseye, the father of the frozen food industry, experienced his eureka moment. He also travels to Dubai to see how mastery of cold has led to penguins in the desert. From IVF to food, politics and Hollywood to human migration, the unsung heroes of cold have led the way.

Science Night October 29

In the frigid valleys of Japan’s Shiga Highlands, a troop of snow monkeys make their way and raise their families in a complex society of rank and privilege where each knows their place. With their confident leader to guide them and their families to shelter and care for them, this troop of snow monkeys is ready to face the world on Nature | Snow Monkeys Wednesday at 7 pm.

When World War I began in 1914, pilots occasionally took pot shots at one another with rifles; however, the fighter had become an efficient killing machine. NOVA | First Air War Wednesday at 8 pm joins a team as they uncover the secrets of some of aviation’s most colorful and deadly early flying machines and explores how their impact played a key role in the nightmare slaughter of the Western Front.

Whether changing our genetic make-up, altering the world’s sleeping patterns, transforming architecture, taking us into space or triggering one of the great social reforms in American history, the pioneers of light have made themselves indispensable throughout human history all on How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson | Light Wednesday at 9 pm.

Science Night October 22

Crows do not have the best of reputations, but their image is about to take a real turn in Nature | A Murder of Crows Wednesday at 7 pm. New research has shown they are among the most intelligent animals in the world, able to use tools as only elephants and chimpanzees do, able to recognize each other’s voices and 250 distinct calls. They are very social, mate for life and raise their young for up to five years. And they are able to recognize individual humans and pick them out of a crowd up to two years later.

The first stage in the adventure of human flight began with daring inventors and aeronauts in 18th-century Paris, where a handful of brilliant and colorful pioneers developed all the essential features of today’s hot air and gas balloons. Their exploits fascinated Benjamin Franklin, who was serving in Paris as the American ambassador. To explore this burst of innovation, NOVA | Ben Franklin’s Balloons Wednesday at 8 pm recreates the thrilling and daunting prospect that the balloon pioneers faced as they left Earth for the first time.

On How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson Wednesday at 9 pm, Johnson considers how the invention of the mirror gave rise to the Renaissance, how glass lenses allow us to reveal worlds within worlds and how, deep beneath the ocean, glass is essential to communication. The link between the worlds of art, science, astronomy, disease prevention and global communication starts with the little-known maverick innovators of glass.

Science Night October 15

Alongside the fastest, strongest, smartest animals are nature’s misfits, odd, bizarre and unlikely creatures that at first glance seem ill-equipped for survival. Left at the starting line in the race for life, these are the apparent losers in the story of evolution, yet somehow they manage to cling to life and in some cases even thrive. Nature | Animal Misfits Wednesday at 7 pm reveals some surprising details about how evolution really works, demonstrating that all animals are remarkably well-adapted to their chosen way of life.

Dirty water has killed more humans than all the wars of history combined, but in the last 150 years, a series of radical ideas, extraordinary innovations have changed our world. On How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson | Clean Wednesday at 8 pm, it’s not only about the world becoming a cleaner place – the iPhone, the subway, flat screen TVs and even the bikini are the result of the valiant efforts of the unsung heroes of clean.

The world today is obsessed by time. On How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson | Time Wednesday at 9 pm, learn how advancements in navigation, the way we work, technology and travel would have been impossible without the unsung heroes of time.