PBS 2016 Online Film Festival

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For the past four years the PBS Online Film Festival has delivered some of the most powerful and engaging stories from filmmakers across the country. Now, attracting more than 1.5 million video stream in its first four years as well as nominations in the Webby Awards, PBS will return for a fifth year on July 11-29, 2016.

Since its launch in 2012, the PBS Online Film Festival has featured diverse films from PBS member stations and ITVS and POV. Starting July 11, viewers can once again watch, vote and share their favorites. This year’s festival includes collaborations with a wide variety of public television producers, including the Center for Asian American Media, Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB), National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC), Pacific Islanders in Communications (PIC), Wisconsin Media Lab and Vision Maker Media.

Beginning July 11, the festival will be available via PBS and station digital platforms, including PBS.org, YouTube and PBS social media channels. All 25 independent films will also be available via the PBS app on iOS, Android, Apple TV, Roku and FireTV devices.

Viewers are encouraged to watch, share and vote for their favorite film by going to: pbs.org/filmfestival. The film with the most votes will receive the “PBS People’s Choice” award. Additionally, for the first time ever, viewers can vote for their favorite film by logging onto their Facebook or Twitter account and sharing their favorite film titles using the #PBSolff. For updates on the festival, follow #PBSolff on Twitter.

KLRU has three local films competing this year: The Superlative Light, Peppermint and The Scar.

 

The Superlative Light
by Ben Steinbauer
Documentary photographer, Robert Shults, went from being a homeless
dreamer to a home-owning artist after taking photos of the brightest
light source in the known universe, a laser in basement of the physics
department at The University of Texas.

Peppermint
by Jay Hubert
6-year-old Samantha must convince her father to take her favorite pet
with them as they move away from their Texas farm.

The Scar
by Brittney Shepherd
Confined by the oppressive summer heat, a single-minded mother, and
the limits of girlhood, a young girl’s outing to the corner store
stirs an unexpected self-realization.

 

 

2015 PBS Online Film Festival Winners

PBS OLFF 2015

Two winners of the fourth-annual PBS Online Film Festival have been announced!

The film that took the “People’s Choice” top honor was “Sinner Victim Saint,” a short narrative presented by CET & Think TV, centering on a newlywed husband who has recently lost his wife in a car accident and the dark turn of events that teaches him the power of sacrifice.

The creator, Moses Flores, is a local Austin cinematographer, director and editor.

The animated film “11 Paper Place,” presented by member station Vermont PBS, a love story about two sheets of paper who meet in a recycle bin, was the most-viewed of the 25 short films screened online.

During the six weeks the films were available for screening, entries were streamed more than 400,000 times, up from 312,000 streams in 2014 over a seven-week period.

More information about the PBS Online Film Festival can be found at pbs.org/filmfestival. The festival is also on Twitter at #PBSolff.

PBS Online Film Festival 2015: Once Again

PBS has announced the 25 films that will be part of the fourth annual, Webby Award-nominated PBS Online Film Festival on June 15 – July 17, 2015. Austin filmmakers Ivete Lucas, John Spotswood Moore and Sai Selvarajan are among those featured in this year’s Festival for their films “Ex-Votos,” “Once Again” and “Sugarless Tea.”

Once Again
In the early nineties, OCD was thought to be a behavioral, almost psychotic disorder. 20 years after his diagnosis, filmmaker John Moore weaves together home movies, animation and live action footage to recall and recreate his childhood struggles with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in his documentary, “Once Again.”

This personal documentary offers a subjective view of torture and triumph and gives viewers Moore’s individualized look at his youth coping with OCD through cognitive behavioral therapy.

About John Spottswood Moore
Moore is a multi-award winning writer and director. While studying for a BA in Film from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, his debut film, “Lemonade Stand,” won multiple awards. Since then, he has worked in both radio and television in various creative positions.  In 2012, Moore received an MFA in Film Directing from the University of Texas at Austin. His four graduate films have continued to play in festivals and win various accolades.

“Once Again” made its debut at the Austin International Film Festival and has been awarded a Barbara Jones Media Award and Excellence Award from the Superfest Film Festival.  Moore currently works as a contract film and video editor and is in production on his first feature documentary, “When We Were Live.”

Don’t forget to vote until July 17th for “Once Again” or any of the three Austin films as the “People’s Choice Award” winner! You can vote for each film every 24 hours.

PBS Online Film Festival 2015: Ex-Votos

PBS has announced the 25 films that will be part of the fourth annual, Webby Award-nominated PBS Online Film Festival on June 15 – July 17, 2015. Austin filmmakers Ivete Lucas, John Spotswood Moore and Sai Selvarajan are among those featured in this year’s Festival for their films “Ex-Votos,” “Once Again” and “Sugarless Tea.”

Ex-Votos
After experiencing a shootout in her neighborhood, Anayansi, a pregnant teenager, fears that she will lose her child. Hoping for a miracle, her mother takes her on a pilgrimage to the festival of Saint Francis in Real de Catorce, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. As their journey merges with thousands of travelers from across Mexico, they must face the reality of her condition and escape the confines of tradition if she is to survive. When Anayansi’s water breaks, the community calls on the Marakame, an honored member of the town revered for his ability to communicate with the forces of nature and the ancient spirits, to help.

About Ivete Lucas
Lucas was born in Brazil and grew up in Mexico. At age 22, she received a grant from the Mexican Film Institute to direct her first short film “ASMA,” which was shortlisted for the Mexican Academy Awards. Since then, she has produced and directed a number of award-winning short films and documentaries. She is currently producing a feature film for artist Keren Cytter and finishing post-production on her first feature documentary “Vietnam Appreciation Day,” which she co-directed with her husband, Patrick Bresnan.

Don’t forget to vote until July 17th for “Ex-Votos” or any of the three Austin films as the “People’s Choice Award” winner! You can vote for each film every 24 hours.

PBS Online Film Festival 2015: Sugarless Tea

PBS has announced the 25 films that will be part of the fourth annual, Webby Award-nominated PBS Online Film Festival on June 15 – July 17, 2015. Austin filmmakers Ivete Lucas, John Spotswood Moore and Sai Selvarajan are among those featured in this year’s Festival for their films “Ex-Votos,” “Once Again” and “Sugarless Tea.”

Sugarless Tea
This short film takes viewers on a journey to India and Queens, NY, in a tale of separated brothers, chance meetings and identity. Sugarless Tea features watercolors paintings filmed using a stop motion technique that evokes travelogues and bedtime stories, and highlights the process of painting itself.

Narrated by Hari Kondabolu, the Queens-raised comic who the NY Times has called “one of the most exciting political comics in stand-up today,” “Sugarless Tea” tells the story of how one man living in India drinks his tea without sugar to fund a trip to the United States and visit his twin brother who was adopted 54 years earlier.

About Sai Selvarajan
Selvarajan was born in Sri-Lanka on a Wednesday night during a coup d’etat. He grew up in Nigeria playing soccer and eating bananas. As a child, Sai spent his holidays traveling with his family through Europe, India, and Sri-Lanka. His family moved to Dallas when he was nine. It was at this point that he fell in love with Texans and American pop culture. The moving image is the medium in which Sai communicates with the world. He brings a fierce passion for storytelling, coupled with great design acumen, resulting in stylistically intense pieces that linger through their emotional resonance. He spends his days at Lucky Post perfecting the American television commercial and his nights dancing to records with his wife and daughter.

Don’t forget to vote until July 17th for “Sugarless Tea” or any of the three Austin films as the “People’s Choice Award” winner! You can vote for each film every 24 hours.

Austin films featured in PBS Online Film Festival 2015

PBS has announced the 25 films that will be part of the fourth annual, Webby Award-nominated PBS Online Film Festival on June 15 – July 17, 2015. Austin filmmakers Ivete Lucas, John Spotswood Moore, and Sai Selvarajan are among those featured in this year’s Festival for their films “ExVotos”, “Once Again”, and “Sugarless Tea”.

Starting June 8th, Roku customers will have exclusive early access to the PBS Online Film Festival for one-week via the PBS channel on Roku players and Roku TV models. Beginning June 15th, the Festival will be available via PBS and station digital platforms including PBS.org, YouTube and PBS social media channels. Viewers are encouraged to vote for their favorite film  to win the “People’s Choice” award. For updates on the festival, follow #PBSolff on Twitter.

The three films submitted by KLRU from Austin filmmakers are:

ExVotos
After experiencing a shootout in her neighborhood, Anayansi, a pregnant teenager, fears that  she will lose her child. Hoping for a miracle, her mother takes her on a pilgrimage to the festival of Saint Francis. As their journey merges with thousands of travelers from across Mexico, they  must face the reality of her condition and escape the confines of tradition if she is to survive.

Once Again
In the early nineties, OCD was thought to be a behavioral, almost psychotic disorder. Weaving together animation, home movies, and animation, filmmaker John Spotswood Moore tells the story of years lost to this horrible condition. Through mental torture, hospitalization, and humiliation, “Once Again” shows how Moore eventually won the fight against this disorder to become a champion of his own mind and body.

Sugarless Tea
Sugarless Tea takes viewers on a journey to India and Queens, NY, in a tale of separated brothers, chance meetings and identity. The film features watercolors filmed using a stop motion technique that evokes travelogues and bedtime stories, and highlights the process of painting itself. The short film is narrated by political comic Hari Kondabolu (Conan, Late Night and John Oliver’s New York Stand Up show).

The PBS Online Film Festival showcases powerful and engaging stories from filmmakers across the country. The Festival has become a popular annual online event; last year it attracted more than 350,000 streams and 50,000 votes cast for the winner, as well as a nomination in the 2015 Webby Awards category for Online Film & Video: Variety (Channel).  This year’s line up features films from the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM), Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB), National Black Programming Consortium, Pacific Islanders in Communications (PIC), POV, StoryCorps and Vision Maker Media, as well as PBS local member stations including Alaska Public Media, CET/ThinkTV (Cincinnati/Dayton), KLRU-TV Austin PBS, KQED (San Francisco), Louisiana Public Broadcasting, Twin Cities Public Television, UNC-TV and Vermont PBS. Promotional partners for the PBS Online Film Festival include Independent Lens and World Channel.

 

PBS Online Film Festival 2014 features Two Austin Films

Today, PBS announced the 25 short films that will be part of the third annual PBS Online Film Festival beginning June 16 – July 31. Austin filmmakers Joshua Riehl and Nidhi Reddy are among those featured in this year’s Festival for their films Digging for Water and The Yellow Wallpaper.

The films will be available for streaming across all PBS digital platforms, including PBS.org, Roku, Xbox, YouTube and PBS social media channels. Viewers are encouraged to vote for their favorite film to win the “People’s Choice” award. For updates on the festival, follow #PBSolff on Twitter.

Digging for Water
Vote here for this film
Joshua Riehl is filmmaker based in Austin, Texas, with a strong background in investigative journalism. Originally from just near Detroit, Michigan, he moved to Austin in 2009 to attend the University of Texas at Austin. He was a producer for PBS Frontline’s 2010 season premiere “Death by Fire” about the questionable execution of Cameron Todd Willingham. With an interest in criminal justice stories, he was Associate Producer for the 2013 SXSW Film Festival’s Audience Award winning documentary “An Unreal Dream” about the highly publicized case of Michael Morton’s wrongful conviction.

Digging for Water came out of three separate trips to Haiti over the course of 18 months and a longtime desire to visit the underdeveloped nation. Falling in love with the country and the people, Riehl intends to continue working in Haiti and  hopes to tell the story of dictator “Papa Doc” Duvalier’s tortuous rule in the future.

The Yellow Wallpaper
Vote here for this film
Nidhi Reddy is a recent graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, majoring in both Mathematics and Radio-TV-Film.  Her short animation, The Yellow Wallpaper, was an official selection of the 2013 London Feminist Film Festival, 2013 Portobello Film Festival in London, 2014 Austin Film Society ShortCase, the 2013 Longhorn Showcase, and has won grand prizes in two student film festivals.

The PBS Online Film Festival showcases powerful stories from filmmakers across the country while providing an opportunity to reach an engaged and digitally savvy audience. Attracting more than 1 million video streams and over 50,000 votes in its first two years, the PBS Online Film Festival has become a popular annual online event.

The PBS Online Film Festival showcases diverse films from Independent Lens, POV and collaborations with public television producers including, Center for Asian American Media, Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB), National Black Programming Consortium (NPBC) and Pacific Islanders in Communications (PIC), Wisconsin Media Lab and Vision Maker Media. This year, several locally-produced short films will be featured from PBS member stations including KQED (San Francisco), KLRU (Austin, TX), Alaska Public Media, Vermont PBS, Arkansas Educational Television (AETN), CET/ThinkTV(Cincinnati/Dayton), WCVE (Richmond, Virginia) and Louisiana Public Broadcasting.

“PBS and member stations are committed to experimenting with new platforms to reach diverse audiences with high-quality and engaging content,” said Ira Rubenstein, Senior Vice President and General Manager, PBS Digital. “PBS is the home for independent film, both online and on-air, and we’re proud that the Online Film Festival has become an annual celebration of unique films representing a diverse array of voices and viewpoints.”

 

PBS Online Film Fest 2013: The Longest Sun

Austin has three locally-made films in the 2nd Annual PBS Online Film Festival. You can vote for the audience award until March 22. Vote at pbs.org/filmfestival

The Longest Sun is a narrative short film inspired by the mythology of the Tewa peoples of northern New Mexico, and is told entirely in the endangered language of Tewa (less than 500 native speakers remain). A blend of fantasy, mystery, and historical fiction, The Longest Sun is a quest story that follows Tahn Pi, a young Tewa boy who sets out on a mythical journey to stop the sun from setting.

As the first film told entirely in the Tewa language, The Longest Sun is the culmination of nearly three years of collaboration with the San Juan, San Idelfonso, Santa Clara, Nambe, and Pojoaque pueblo communities and local governments. From conception to translation, the filmmaker and various Tewa community leaders worked together to document and preserve the oral traditions and language of the Tewa people through the medium of film. Peppered with colorful characters and rich in oral tradition, The Longest Sun explores universal perceptions of time, maturation, and death through a modern adaptation of an ancient Tewa origin story.

About the Filmmaker: Patrick William Smith (MFA in Film Production, UT Austin) works as a director and cinematographer between Austin, TX and Seattle, WA. He has directed a number of award-winning fiction and nonfiction films, web-series, and commercials. His documentary, Shades of The Border, toured at over two dozen film festivals worldwide (including SXSW, Media That Matters), garnering a number of awards and DVD distribution.  Patrick went on to direct a reality web-series for internet mogul, Penny Arcade, and later developed a comedy web-series funded through a successful, front-page crowdsourcing campaign on Kickstarter (Kris and Scott’s, Scott and Kris Show), which drew national media attention. Patrick’s most recent endeavor, a narrative quest film told entirely in the endangered Tewa language, is currently touring festivals worldwide. Looking ahead, Patrick has begun development on his first feature. 

PBS Online Film Fest 2013: Mijo (My Son)

Austin has three locally-made films in the 2nd Annual PBS Online Film Festival. You can vote for the audience award until March 22. Vote at pbs.org/filmfestival

Mijo is an immensely personal documentary about the relationship between a young mother who is a professional dancer and her 6-year old son, as she undergoes treatment for breast cancer. The film is a delicate balance between the son’s innocence, the mother’s medical journey and its depiction through dance. Ultimately, the film is an affirmation of love and the purpose of life.

About the Filmmaker: Chithra Jeyaram is an emerging documentary filmmaker and educator with an MFA in Film Production from University of Texas at Austin. Her first exposure to filmmaking began in 2004 with a failed attempt to fund a film about an explosive water-sharing dispute between two southern states in India. Deeply affected by that experience, she quit a decade-long career as Physical Therapist and enrolled in film school.

A diseased human body is a chaotic system and as a filmmaker she is interested in telling stories of the disruptive consequences of illness from unique perspectives. Approximately 30% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States have young dependent children living with them. In Mijo, she highlights some of the difficulties experienced by cancer survivors with young children.

Besides making non-fiction films, she loves to illustrate, animate, take spontaneous trips, cook exotic recipes and work as a physical therapist.

PBS Online Film Fest 2013: Noc na Tanečku (Night at the Dance)

Austin has three locally-made films in the 2nd Annual PBS Online Film Festival. You can vote for the audience award until March 22. Vote at pbs.org/filmfestival

In the late 1800’s, tens of thousands of Czech immigrants settled farmland in Central Texas. They brought with them the tradition of the community dance hall, building over 1,000 halls in little towns from Temple to Anhalt. Fewer than half remain open today. Noc na Tanečku (Night at the Dance) profiles Sefcik Hall, in Seaton, one of the last true Czech dance halls in Texas, and the elderly folk that still come there each Sunday to wax the floor and dance the polka, even as they struggle with old age, illness, and in some cases, death.

About the Filmmaker: Annie Silverstein is an Austin based filmmaker and media educator. She directed the feature documentary March Point (Independent Lens 2008), in collaboration with three teenagers from the Swinomish Tribe and is Co-Founder of Longhouse Media, an indigenous media arts & education organization based in Seattle, WA. Annie has worked internationally as a Producer, Director, Cinematographer, and Editor on films ranging in theme from land access issues in Ethiopia to the experiences of LGBTI refugees living in South Africa. Most recently she produced/directed Noc na Tanečku (Night at the Dance), which screened at festivals internationally, and wrote/directed her first fiction film Spark, which screened at Slamdance and SXSW, where it won a Jury Award for Best Texas Short (2012). Annie is currently earning her MFA at University of Texas-Austin.