KLRU NewsBriefs air a Texas Tribune Investigation: Hurting for Work

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This weekend during PBS NewsHour we partnered with The Texas Tribune to bring you part of their investigation Hurting for Work You can see extended versions of these stories and other stories in the investigation here.

On Saturday, Texas Tribune Multimedia Reporter Alana Rocha tells the story of Santiago Arias. In 2006 Arias fell two stories to the ground while working for a contractor in Houston. He now has no feeling from the chest down. He only remembers waking up in the hospital.

“I could hear [people in the hospital], but I couldn’t express anything. I could hear them say I was quadriplegic, but I didn’t know what that was,” Arias said.

His employer did not carry workers’ compensation insurance. Texas is the only state in the country that doesn’t require employers to provide coverage.

You can see and read an extended version of Arias’ story here.

On Sunday, part two of the Tribune investigation focuses on Crystal Davis. Davis’ husband, Wayne Davis, died while traveling from their home to a Burger King franchise. He worked as a sales, profit and operations coach for Burger King and was among the 81 percent of Texas workers covered by worker’s compensation insurance.

Davis had to fight to receive payments from the insurance company, which claimed her husband was not working when he died. Just days after The Texas Tribune’s reporting of Davis’ case, the insurance company dropped their lawsuit against Davis and her two children.

You can see and read the extended version of Davis’ story here.

Both stories were produced by The Texas Tribune. They air on KLRU during PBS NewsHour Weekend at 6:30pm on Saturday and Sunday. 

 

KLRU NewsBriefs: Two very different Austin museums mark milestones

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This weekend during PBS NewsHour we have two different indoor activities you can check out: the Harry Ransom Center’s WWI exhibit and the South Austin Pop Culture Center.

On Saturday we peak inside SouthPop, a non-profit museum dedicated to preserving Austin’s music history and the art surrounding that industry. SouthPop’s director Leea Mechling told us this history is more important for residents to know than ever.

“This place is important to give context of Austin’s culture to people who have lived here for a long time and for people who have just moved here. The era of the ’60s and ’70s and ’80s was really a building time of Austin’s unique culture,” Mechling said.

SouthPop is celebrating 10 years this Summer. It is located on South Lamar and is open Thursday through Sunday 1 – 6pm.

Our Sunday story takes you inside the Harry Ransom Center on the University of Texas campus. To commemorate the centennial of the start of World War I, the museum is presenting The World at War: 1914-1918. Some might be surprised to hear about an historical exhibit at the Ransom Center, and curator Jean Cannon said that’s what makes their exhibit unique.

“We have great holdings for literature so a lot of the items that you’ll see in the gallery are diaries or letters and items that give a very personal moment of living between 1914 and 1918,” Cannon told us.

The exhibit runs through August 3. The Harry Ransom Center is free and open to the public.

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend, Saturday and Sunday at 6:30pm. 

KLRU NewsBrief: East Side Company Puts New Spin on Compost

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This Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend we’ll preview a Central Texas Gardener story about an East Austin company offering a fossil fuel-free way to compost.

Since 2012, East Side Compost Pedallers has cycled through 5 neighborhoods to collect residential and commercial compostables. Residential customers pay $4 a week, each opting to spare the landfill and instead nourish their neighborhood farms and urban microgrowers.

East Side Pies pays the Compost Pedallers to pick up their vegetable scraps. They say they’ve even attracted more customers as a result.

“We have a lot of vegetable scrap and instead of it going into a dumpster it goes back into soil and our local community and gets more food for everybody. The fact that we’re taking several hundred pounds of waste out of the landfill I think more than makes up for the small cost that we pay,” Randall Holt of East Side Pies told us.

East Side Compost Pedallers recently won the Austin Green Business Leaders Communication and Outreach award.

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend. An extended version of “Will Pedal for Compost” will air during Central Texas Gardener on July 12 at noon.

KLRU News Briefs: Hole in the Wall Turns 40, Artists Beautify North Austin Fence

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KLRU News Briefs are back this weekend during PBS NewsHour after two weeks off. This weekend we’ll hear from a group of local artists who decided to use art to beautify their North Austin neighborhood and about a birthday celebration kicking off this week for the Hole in the Wall’s 40th anniversary.

On Saturday night tune in for an excerpt from the Arts in Context Short Beautiful Fences, the story behind a mural on a fence along Lamar Boulevard between Payton Gin and Rundberg.

“I started out just [painting] “Beauty Will Save the World” in black and white, just the lettering, knowing it would be tagged,” Artist Rigel Thurston tells us. “The people who tagged it…it was too perfect. So, the idea is to include the first round of taggers because they’re part of this neighborhood too.”

On Sunday, the owner of The Hole in the Wall, Will Tanner, tells us about the 40th anniversary party that kicks off on June 19. Plus, he talks about how the bar has evolved over the past four decades.

“The Hole in the Wall is this great place that’s been here a long time and it’s had to change a lot to survive, but I think what has been kept from the past is what makes us great,” Tanner says. Ultimately [this] is a place for like minded, and maybe even not like minded, people to come and enjoy themselves and enjoy live art…eat good food and drink great local beer and just spend some of your life.”

You can find out more about the lineup of bands performing during the celebration here.

KLRU News Briefs air this Saturday and Sunday at 6:30pm during PBS NewsHour Weekend. 

 

KLRU News Briefs: Texas Quilt Museum & Love Your Block, Austin!

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This weekend (May 17-18) during PBS NewsHour Weekend, we take a look inside the Texas Quilt Museum in La Grange and hear about Love Your Block, Austin!, a mini-grant program being offered by the Austin Mayor’s Office.

The Texas Quilt Museum in La Grange is drawing visitors from all over the world. It was founded by cousins Karey Bresenhan and Nancy O’Bryant Puentes, who have also written books about quilting and who founded the International Quilt Association and annual festival in Houston.

Museum Manager Julie Maffei said many people don’t realize how valuable an old quilt they own might be.

“We get a lot of, ‘Oh my God what did I do to my family’s quilt?’ And we’ve heard every kind of horror story there is, from dogs having puppies on them to wrapping water heaters with them in the winter, to using them to move furniture,” Maffei said.

The museum is also becoming well known for melding the art of quilting with the art of garden design. Tune in to KLRU’s Central Texas Gardener for an extended version of this story or find it on the CTG Blog.

Love Your Block, Austin! is offering $500 to $1,000 improvement grants to neighborhood groups in under-served areas of Austin. The application deadline is June 1 and so far the city has only received one completed application. 10-20 groups can get the funds.

“Love Your Block, Austin! is an amazing opportunity for anyone who wants to do an improvement that they can do on their own in the neighborhood,” Grant Coordinator Nevena Pilipovic-Wengler said. ”It’s a really flexible application and it’s a flexible process, it can take place on private and public property. We at Mayor Leffingwell’s office just really believe in this program and believe that it can fund great improvement projects and really encourage people to apply by the deadline of June 1.”

Pilipovic-Wengler told us a few groups are interested in funding community gardens between schools and neighborhood associations. In our story we speak to Ortega Elementary School PTA President Hilda Villalobos Alvarez about her community garden application.

If you have a project you think would be a good fit you can apply on the city’s website: austintexas.gov/loveyourblock.

KLRU News Briefs air locally every Saturday and Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend at 6:30pm. 

KLRU News Brief: Austin Students Learn Importance of Water

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This Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend, we go inside the Austin Water Utility’s 20th annual Water Science Expo. Area 5th and 6th graders attended the event on Tuesday and Wednesday to learn about the importance of responsible water use. Austin Water employees did demonstrations for the kids in an interactive event which was fun and educational.

“We take it very seriously to educate this generation and future generations about the value of taking your water very seriously,” Austin Water spokesperson Jill Mayfield said. “It’s no secret that we’re in a very severe drought and that we need to be mindful and aware of how we use water every day.”

Mayfield said the event also served as a way to educate parents, because the kids go home and tell their families what they learned.

On Saturday, we’ll air an Arts in Context Short about #ATXFreeArtFriday, an Instagram art treasure hunt. You can see that piece online here.

 KLRU News Briefs air locally on Saturday and Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend. 

News Briefs: Dell Medical School Launch & Wildflower Center’s Family Garden

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This week during PBS NewsHour Weekend: two exciting unveilings, each with UT ties. On Saturday, we hear from State Senator Kirk Watson and Dean Clay Johnston at the “launch” of the UT Dell Medical School.

Dr. Johnston, who currently makes up a faculty of 1 at the school, stressed the importance of more doctors to meet the medical needs of Austin’s growing population.

“We can’t train enough doctors in the current system to meet the need. There’s just no way,” Johnston said in his speech Monday. “They’re already about 20 percent behind the doctors who we should have here in Austin.”

On Sunday, we take a sneak peek at the new Luci and Ian Family Garden at the Lady Bird Johnston Wildflower Center. An extended version of the story by Central Texas Gardener’s Linda Lehmusvirta will air during CTG on Saturday. You can see it online here.

The garden was 15 years in conception and extends upon the mission Lady Bird had for the future generations.

“We believe that this is a family commitment,” her daughter Luci Baines Johnson said. “If we don’t join in that commitment from our very youngest to our very eldest than we are missing out on the joy that we can bring to multiple generations.”

You can watch the stories this Saturday and Sunday at 6:30pm during PBS NewsHour Weekend. 

 

KLRU News Briefs: No Kill Anniversary & Art from the Streets

KLRU News Briefs

This weekend during PBS NewsHour Weekend, we have stories about two Austin non-profits with different plans for expansion.

On Saturday (3/29), our story is about Austin’s three year anniversary of being a “No Kill City.” That means 90% or more of the animals that enter the city’s shelter are coming out alive and being adopted.

Austin’s city council passed its first No Kill resolution back in 1997, with the goal of becoming a no kill city at some point. It wasn’t until October 2010 when the city put a plan into action, and allocated about $650,000 toward the goal. February 2011 was the first month the 90% goal was achieved. Austin is the largest no kill city in the US.

The non-profit Austin Pets Alive! is one of many shelters in the city working toward No Kill. APA is unique because it focuses on the “bottom 50%” of animals who might otherwise end up on the euthanasia list. In the past few years APA set its sights beyond Austin with a goal of making America “No Kill.” APA hosted its fourth annual AmPA Conference in Austin in February and is working with organizations and shelters in many other states.

On Sunday (3/30), we visit Art from the Streets, an organization which has taught art classes and offered open studio time to Austin’s homeless for more than 20 years.

“It started very, extremely, low key. We came in with pieces of paper and crayons,” Co-Founder Heloise Gold said. ”It shatters our stereotyping of who we think homeless people are, completely shatters it. If you have the right support, people flourish in their creativity.”

 Art from the Streets hosts an annual art show and sale each year around the holidays. The group is trying to raise money to improve its website to allow the artists to sell their work online throughout the year. They would also like to add another location for open studio time.

You can see both of these stories during PBS NewsHour Weekend on KLRU Saturday and Sunday at 6:30pm.