Screening: LaDonna Harris documentary 11/5

Join KLRU for a special screening of the PBS documentary LADONNA HARRIS: INDIAN 101 directed by Austin filmmaker Julianna Brannum edited by Austinite Sam Douglas

DATE: Wednesday, November 5
TIME: 7 pm (doors open at 6:30 pm)
LOCATION: KLRU’s Studio 6A
RSVP: The event is free but RSVP is required. RSVP now

This documentary profiles the life and work of Comanche political and social activist LaDonna Harris. Filmmaker Julianna Brannum and editor Sam Douglas will be in attendance to discuss the film and answer audience questions.

LADONNA HARRIS: INDIAN 101 chronicles the life of Comanche activist and national civil rights leader LaDonna Harris and the role that she has played in Native and mainstream American history since the 1960s. Harris’ activism began in Oklahoma, fighting segregation and assisting grassroots Native and women’s groups. She continued her work in Washington, DC where she helped to introduce landmark programs and legislation including tribal land return claims, improving education and healthcare for Native Americans, ending job discrimination against women, and protecting environmental resources for tribes. Using interviews, archival footage and photographs, LADONNA HARRIS: INDIAN 101 celebrates her life and the personal struggles that led her to become a voice for Native people and highlights her contemporary work to strengthen and rebuild indigenous communities and train emerging Native leaders around the world.

This event is part of KLRU’s Native American Heritage Month programming.

 

Native American Heritage Month programs

KLRU broadcasts programming created by and about people from all cultures year-round, from public affairs to history to independent film to kids programming. In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, KLRU will broadcast a lineup of new and encore presentations honoring and exploring Native American culture.

Our celebration begins with a screening of LaDonna Harris: Indian 101 on November 5th. Find out more here

Warriors Return
Sunday, November 9 at 4 pm
Navajo veterans of beautiful Canyon de Chelly, AZ have served as Code Talkers in WWII, Army Rangers in Viet Nam and most recently in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, their dedication and courage in battle has not protected them from the formidable challenges facing them when they return home. Viewers will see how strong women, traditional healing and western talk therapy are helping these warriors return.

Across The Creek
Thursday, November 13 at 9:30 pm
This program is a half-hour conversation among members of the Lakota, who are seeking ways to restore their culture after a legacy of colonialism. Offering a fresh perspective into the lives of the Sioux on the Rosebud and Pine Ridge reservations, the film looks at how these Sioux communities struggle to maintain tradition, while confronting the challenges of broken families, abuse, and poverty. By sharing their stories across generations, they hope to build a vision for the future. Across the Creek was produced by independent filmmaker John Cournoyer.

LaDonna Harris:  Indian 101
Monday, November 17 at 10 pm
Sunday, November 23 at 2 pm
This documentary profiles Comanche activist LaDonna Harris, who led an extensive life of political and social activism. Her national work began when President Lyndon Johnson tapped her to educate the executive and legislative branches on the unique role of American Indian Tribes and their relationship to the U.S. government. The course was called “Indian 101″ and was taught to members of Congress and other agencies for more than 35 years. In addition to her work in civil rights, world peace, the environment and women’s rights, Harris is best known for introducing landmark legislation, such as land return claims to the Taos Pueblo Tribe and Native tribes of Alaska, as well as returning federal recognition for the Menominee Tribe. LaDonna Harris: Indian 101 was produced by independent filmmaker Julieanna Brannum.

Our Fires Still Burn: The Native American Experience
Sunday, November 23 at 1 pm
This compelling documentary invites viewers into the lives of contemporary Native American role models living in the United States Midwest.  It dispels the myth that American Indians have disappeared from the American horizon and reveals how they continue to persist, heal from the past, confront the challenges of today, keep their culture alive and make great contributions to society.


POV “Up Heartbreak Hill”
Sunday, November 23 at 3 pm
Thomas and Tamara are track stars at their rural New Mexico high school. Like many teenagers, they are torn between the lure of brighter futures elsewhere and the ties that bind them to home. For these teens, however, home is an impoverished town on the Navajo reservation, and leaving means separating from family, tradition and the land that has been theirs for generations. Erica Scharf’s “Up Heartbreak Hill” is a look at a new generation of Americans struggling to be both Native and modern.

Spirit in the Glass:  Plateau Native Beadwork
Sunday, November 23 at 4 pm
Celebrate the spectacular beadwork and culture of the Columbia River Plateau People through the eyes and hearts of the artists. Together, they share their history, motivation, and the beadwork that plays an important role in binding their culture together.

 

Native American Heritage Month

KLRU broadcasts programming created by and about people from all cultures year-round, from public affairs to history to independent film to kids programming. In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, KLRU will broadcast a lineup of new and encore presentations honoring and exploring Native American culture.

11/18 - Independent Lens Indian Relay at 9 pm
The hope and determination of modern-day American Indian life is revealed in this story about what it takes to win one of the most exciting and dangerous forms of horse racing practiced anywhere in the world today. From the bitter cold of winter on the Rocky Mountain front to the heat and mayhem of the summer’s championship races in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho and Oregon, “Indian Relay” follows several teams from three different American Indian communities as they prepare for and compete across a grueling Indian Relay season — all hearts set on the glory and honor of winning this year’s National Championships.

11/25 – Independent Lens Young Lakota at 9 pm
In a small town in the heart of the Pine Ridge Reservation, Sunny Clifford, her twin sister Serena and their neighbor, Brandon Ferguson, share a common dream of helping to create a better future for their tribe. When South Dakota passes a law criminalizing abortion, their tribal President, Cecelia Fire Thunder, challenges it with a threat to build a clinic on the reservation, drawing Sunny, Serena and Brandon into a political storm that changes the course of each of their lives.

11/25 – Injunuity at 10 pm
Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity. Injunuity is a mix of animation, music, and real thoughts from real people exploring our world from the Native American perspective. Every word spoken is verbatim, every thought and opinion is real, told in nine short pieces and covering such topics as language preservation, sacred sites, and the environment. But rather than simply revisit our history, the goal of Injunuity is to help define our future, to try and figure out the path that lies before us, to focus on where we are going as well as where we have been.

On KLRU-Q:

11/3 - Choctow CodeTalkers at 5 pm
The empowering chronicle of Choctaw Soldiers as the original Code Talkers during World War I, a story which has been buried in history for nearly a hundred years. With testimonies from family members and Choctaw tribal leaders, the program brings a unique perspective to these forgotten heroes and their wartime contributions.

11/3 – Northern California Indian Veterans of WWII at 6 pm
When America joined the Allies in World War II in 1941, over 25,000 Native American people joined the war effort. Although their stories are rarely told, they are part of “The Greatest Generation.” Original Patriots: Northern California Indian Veterans of WWII shares the stories of three Northern California Native American Veterans of World War II. Lee Hover, (Karuk Tribe), Frank Richards, (Tolowa/Smith River Rancheria), and Wally Scott (Yurok Tribe) recount their experiences at Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima and D-Day, and share their views on the costs of war.

Kind Hearted Woman airs April 1 & 2

In a special two-part series from Frontline and Independent Lens, filmmaker David Sutherland (The Farmer’s Wife, Country Boys) creates an unforgettable portrait of Robin Charboneau, a 32-year-old divorced single mother and Oglala Sioux woman living on North Dakota’s Spirit Lake Reservation. Sutherland follows Robin over three years as she struggles to raise her two children, further her education and heal herself from the wounds of sexual abuse she suffered as a child. Robin’s battles in tribal court with her ex-husband for custody of the children, even after he is convicted of abusive sexual contact with his daughter, illuminates how serious this problem is on the reservation. Her quest to heal her family, find a man worthy of her love, build a career and fulfill her goal of returning to her reservation to help prevent the abuse of women and children, takes her on an intimate and inspiring journey full of heartbreak, discovery and redemption. Episode 1 airs Monday, April 1st at 8 pm and Episode 2 airs Tuesday, April 2nd at 8 pm on KLRU.

July 2012: P.O.V. "Up Heartbreak Hill"

Each month, KLRU chooses a program for your family to enjoy together. This month’s Family Choice program, UP HEARTBREAK HILL, explores the lives of Native American teens.

P.O.V. “Up Heartbreak Hill
Sunday, July 29, 5-6 p.m.

Thomas and Tamara are track stars at their rural New Mexico high school. Like many teenagers, they are torn between the lure of brighter futures elsewhere and the ties that bind them to home. For these teens, however, home is an impoverished town on the Navajo reservation, and leaving means separating from family, tradition and the land that has been theirs for generations. Erica Scharf’s “Up Heartbreak Hill” is a look at a new generation of Americans struggling to be both Native and modern.