Things get Odd with our Oddtober Halloween Programs

There’s a ton of spooky fun coming to PBS KIDS this October! In addition to the October 23rd premiere of Arthur and the Haunted Tree House on television and streaming devices, there are new Halloween episodes from Odd Squad, Splash and Bubbles, Sesame Street, and Cyberchase. There will also be the return of the hit specials: The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About Halloween! and Curious George: A Halloween Boo Fest.
KLRU airs Arthur and the Haunted Tree House movie at 6:30 am and 2pm on the 23rd on KLRU; 7 am and 8pm Oct. 23rd on KLRU PBS KIDS 24/7 and KLRU Q.
Word World: A Kooky Spooky Halloween | Sheep’s Halloween Costume — Wednesday, Oct. 11 at 12:30 pm
Ready Jet Go! Jet’s First Halloween — Wednesday, Oct. 11 at 1 pm
Splash and Bubbles: Yuck or Treat — Monday, Oct. 16 at 9:30 am
Odd Squad: Haunt Squad — Monday, Oct. 16 at 3:30 pm
SuperWhy! The Ghost Who Was Afraid of Halloween — Friday, Oct. 20 at 11:30 am
Cyberchase: The Halloween Howl — Friday, Oct. 20 at 8:30 pm
Peg + Cat: The Parade Problem | The Halloween Problem — Friday, Oct. 20 at 12 pm
Curious George: A Halloween Boo Fest — Monday, Oct. 23 at 7:30 am
Cyberchase: Watts of Halloween Trouble — Monday, Oct. 23 at 6am
Sesame Street Halloween — Monday, Oct 23 at 10:30 am
Clifford’s Puppy Days: The Halloween Bandit | An Honest Spin — Sunday, Oct. 29 at 9:30 am
Fun Activities!
  • Carve out some time with your little one and create a PBS KIDS jack o’ lantern. We’ve made it easy for you with these pumpkin carving templates.
  • Do you have your Halloween costumes yet? PBS KIDS for Parents has all kinds of DIY costume suggestions including some from your favorite PBS KIDS shows!
  • Arthur and the Haunted Tree House features a sleepover. If your kids are excited about the idea of having a sleepover, but aren’t quite ready, Arthur has a daytime activity you can use to practice before you try the real thing.
  • Grab a flashlight and your favorite monster stories! PBS KIDS for Parents has some monstrously good book suggestions you can use for your very own Halloween sleepover.

This fall, PBS will also offer PreK-12 teachers an easy way to integrate Halloween themes into their instruction with a range of curriculum-aligned videos, lesson plans and games. Teachers can use these resources to enhance homework assignments or kick-start classroom discussions. These free resources are available to teachers nationwide on pbslearningmedia.org. Examples include Peg + Cat’s Tiger Trick or Treat, PBS LearningMedia’s All About the Holidays: Halloween, PBS Digital Studios’ Frankenstein, M.D. and more.

It’s no joke! KLRU PBS KIDS 24/7 starts April 1st

We have heard from the community that families want our fun, educational programming in the evening hours and at different times, such as when kids are sick or when mom and dad are making dinner. In response to this community need, on April 1st at 6 am we’ll launch a brand new channel featuring your favorite PBS Kids shows 24 hours a day.

We are thrilled that we can provide this new tool for all families in our 18 county viewing area – whether you’re at home, away from home, or on the go.

Watch KLRU PBS KIDS 24/7 on TV channel 18.4
Download the free PBS Kids Video App

Research consistently shows that PBS Kids resources help prepare children of all backgrounds for school and that exposure to our programs builds literacy skills, boosts math learning and fosters social-emotional growth.

PBS KIDS Ranks #1 in Preparing Kids for Success in School and Life
For more than a decade, the American public has consistently ranked PBS KIDS as the number-one educational media brand for children.iii In a recent survey, PBS KIDS ranked first in school readiness among children’s TV networks. When asked how well networks prepare children for school, 81 percent of parents said PBS KIDS helps a lot/somewhat, topping the next closest network by 11 percent. Parents also credited PBS KIDS for more positive behavior exhibited by children after watching. PBS KIDS stands out as the most trusted and safe place for children to watch television and the best use of families’ screen time, according to the study. PBS commissioned the study with an independent research firm. More findings are available here.

Leading children’s media experts point to PBS KIDS as a trusted resource for families, too. “PBS KIDS’ series are consistently among the highest-rated shows that Common Sense Media reviews,” said James P. Steyer, founder and CEO of Common Sense Media. “Millions of children across our country stand to benefit from the increased access to PBS KIDS’ exceptional content with the launch of the 24/7 PBS KIDS channel.” Similarly, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), in its recently updated guidelines for children’s media use, recommends PBS KIDS as the leading resource for quality, educational screen time. The new AAP guidelines also encourage parents to watch TV with their children and talk about it together.

Decades of research confirms that PBS KIDS media content helps children build critical skills – among them, early literacy, math and social-emotional skills – that enable them to find success in school and life, while also helping parents increase their own engagement in their children’s learning. A study conducted by WestEd found that PBS KIDS resources can help prepare children from low-income families for kindergarten.iv Additionally, parents’ awareness of their children’s math learning increased significantly – as did their use of strategies to support their children’s learning.v

“We know from years of research that PBS KIDS helps children build important social-emotional and school readiness skills, and that the learning potential of media is multiplied when parents co-view with their children,” said Lesli Rotenberg, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Children’s Media and Education, PBS. “We are encouraged to see how much parents value family viewing time, ranking PBS KIDS as the number-one use of family screen time, because parent involvement is critical to our long-term vision of using the power of media to create a personalized learning experience that engages and meets the needs of kids, parents and teachers.”

Learning Opportunities for All

Live TV is the dominant way children access video, with most of kids’ TV viewing taking place on weeknights and weekends.vi This is true for all children, but especially for those in low-income families, who make up a significant percentage of PBS’ audience.vii The new PBS KIDS channel will be a critical resource for young children living in low-income households, who are more likely to rely on TV for educational content, and to be under-connected, with many families able to connect only via mobile devices and with inconsistent access to the internet.viii

iii Marketing & Research Resources, Inc. (M&RR), January 2017. Survey of 1,002 adults, 18 years of age and older, who participated via phone January 3-10, 2017. Results were weighted to be statistically representative of the adult U.S. population.

iv Learning with PBS KIDS: A Study of Family Engagement and Early Mathematics Achievement, WestEd, 2015.

v Learning with PBS KIDS: A Study of Family Engagement and Early Mathematics Achievement, WestEd, 2015.

vi Nielsen Total Audience Report 2Q2016.

vii Nielsen NPOWER Live PUT, 9/21/2015-9/18/2016, K2-11, K2-11 in HH w/Inc <$20K, select dayparts.

viii Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America 2013, Common Sense Media; Opportunity for all? Technology and learning in lower-income families. A report of the Families and Media Project, The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop, 2016.

New PBS Kids streaming service launches 1/16

KLRU and PBS will launch new, free localized 24/7 children’s programming live stream services on Jan. 16th!  The effort is KLRU’s latest initiative to support early learning in the community. We will also be adding a 24/7 Kids broadcast channel in April (stay tuned for more details on that!)

This streaming services will make it easy for Central Texas children to watch their favorite series during primetime and other after-school hours when viewing among families is high. Viewers will be able to watch the KLRU-branded live stream through pbskids.org and on the PBS KIDS Video App, which is available on a variety of mobile devices, and tablets. Soon after launch, the live stream will be available on over-the-top platforms such as Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Android TV, Xbox One and Chromecast. The live stream complements on-demand clips and full episodes, which will continue to be available for free on the PBS KIDS Video App and streaming via pbskids.org.

Following its initial launch, the localized live stream experience will expand to offer an integrated games feature, enabling children to toggle between a PBS KIDS show and an activity that extends learning – all in one seamless digital experience. The live stream and games feature is grounded in research demonstrating that measurable gains in learning are achieved when children engage with PBS KIDS content on multiple platforms. The games will align with the learning goals of each TV series, deepening children’s involvement and supporting learning.

PBS stations reach more kids aged 2-5, more moms with children under 6 years old and more children from low-income families than any other kids TV network. With its new 24/7  digital offerings, KLRU will build on this reach and impact.

Through this effort, KLRU will extend its commitment to early learning by offering more families high-quality PBS KIDS content that is trusted by parents and proven to help kids learn. In a recent survey, PBS KIDS led all networks in improving kids’ behavior, with 74% of parents saying their child exhibits more positive behavior after engaging with PBS KIDS. And years of research confirm that PBS KIDS media content helps children build critical skills that enable them to find success in school and life, while also helping parents increase their own engagement. A recent study conducted by WestEd found that PBS KIDS resources can help narrow the math achievement gap for children from low-income families and better prepare them for kindergarten. Additionally, parents’ awareness of their children’s math learning increased significantly – as did their use of strategies to support their children’s learning.