KLRU News Briefs: Last Minute Surge in Voter Registration & Ten Acre Organics’ Sustainable Aquaponics

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This Saturday during PBS NewsHour Weekend we profile Ten Acre Organics, a sustainable urban farm in East Austin.

Friends Lloyd Minick and Michael Hanan founded the farm back in 2012 with the goal of creating a sustainable approach to agriculture in an urban environment. Now they’ve created a business, using composting, two aquaponics systems and naturally-ventilated greenhouses.

“We sell baskets of groceries  and what we do is we try to sell ten of them in any week to neighbors and people that we work with, and then the food that’s produced in the aquaponics system mostly herbs and greens we sell to local restaurants,” Michael Hanan said.

You can find out more about Ten Acre Organics by watching an extended version of that story on the Central Texas Gardener blog.

On Sunday, we talk to Travis County officials to get a tally of how many people registered to vote before the midnight deadline on Monday, October 6th. Travis County Tax Registrar Bruce Elfant said they saw more people registering this year than in recent gubernatorial election cycles.

“It’s not like a presidential cycle but it’s higher than we typically see in a gubernatorial year,” Elfant said. “We had locations at every Thundercloud Subs throughout Travis County. People could also register at any tax office location, or pick up cards at libraries or post offices. We believe we received as many as 10,000 cards on Monday.”

We also spoke to some University of Texas students registering their classmates on campus.

KLRU News Briefs air every Saturday and Sunday evening during PBS NewsHour Weekend at 6:30pm. 

 

 

KLRU News Briefs: Revel in Old School Charm at the Drive-In and Voter Registration Deadline Nears

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Our Saturday news brief during PBS NewsHour Weekend comes from KLRU’s Arts in Context Shorts series. This week they go inside The Blue Starlite, a vintage drive-in which utilizes vintage speakers, trailers and the tarmac of the former airport.

A few nights every week cars gather just before sundown and line up in front of the screen, the distant city skyline appearing as a backdrop. What started as a stunt to impress his then girlfriend and now wife, owner Josh Frank’s drive-in has grown to accommodate up to 50 cars, a handful of walk-ins, and a Winnebago-housed concession stand.

“The whole combined experience, especially with being outside and under the stars – it’s just a very unique experience that’s totally outside of what you would get at a traditional theater,” Manager Gregg Wehmeier said.

The last day to register to vote in the November election is Monday, October 6. So, on Sunday, we take a look back at the final two debates for Lieutenant Governor and Governor, which both took place this week. Monday, in the race for Lt. Governor, Republican Nominee Dan Patrick and Democratic Nominee Leticia Van de Putte faced off in KLRU’s Studio 6A. On Tuesday, Gubernatorial candidates, Republican Nominee Greg Abbott and Democratic Nominee Wendy Davis, debated in the KERA studio in Dallas.

KLRU News Briefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend at 6:30pm on Saturday and Sunday. 

KLRU NewsBriefs: Education Advocates Focus on Attendance, UT Program Supports Financially Independent Students

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The school year is now in full swing, and we have two education stories during PBS NewsHour this weekend to help ease you into things.

On Saturday, we hear from AISD Interim Superintendent Dr. Paul Cruz about why attendance is one of the district’s top priorities.

“We can tell from early on, as early as 5th grade, we can look at if a student is meeting promotion standards, if the student has a good attendance record and if a student is passing all of his or her classes,” Dr. Cruz said. “If that’s not happening, there’s a student who is at risk of not graduating on time with his or her class. [Our first step is] an immediate conversation with the parents to see what we can do to help out the student and the family.”

On Sunday, we hear about Horns Helping Horns, a group from New Student Services on the UT campus which offers emotional and financial support to students who are not receiving any financial help from family.

“I think students have challenges no matter what their background is and I think our students and our community a lot of times because they don’t have that emotional and financial support are dealing with a lot more stuff,” Esmer Bedia, the Horns Helping Horns Coordinator said. “But, the majority of our students are succeeding and graduating and I think that’s because we’re telling them, ya’ll can do it, you will do it and they do succeed.”

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend, Saturday and Sunday evening at 6:30. 

 

 

 

KLRU NewsBriefs: Austin’s Growing Muslim Community and a New Farm School

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On Saturday during PBS NewsHour we hear about Austin’s growing Muslim population. Muslims around the world marked the end of Ramadan this week with Eid al-Fitr. Thousands of worshipers gathered at the North Austin Event Center on Monday to pray and listen to a sermon. It was a huge turnout for the growing community in Austin, and next  year organizers are planning to move to an even bigger venue.

“Every year is more than we can handle,” Imam Islam Mossaad of the North Austin Community Center said Monday.

Imam Islam said that growth comes from immigrants from all over the world, as well as new converts.

“Muslims [are] spread out throughout the rest of the world, 1.5 billion Muslims, [and] in Austin that diversity is reflected. But also with the added touch of people who are Caucasian-American or African-American or Latino-American who are also coming into Islam,” Imam Islam said. “You have more than 80 different countries represented here today, probably more than that, but we are all also Americans at the same time and so we practice our faith here freely.”

On Sunday, our story is about Austin’s first ever farm school, opening this fall. Farmer Starter grew out of Farmshare Austin, a non-profit focused on educating Central Texans about farming and increasing access to organic, locally-grown food.

“It’s a very challenging business and this is a kind of challenging environment to do it in but we feel that local organic food is a human right and that people should have access to that kind of product and so we want to make sure that it’s widely available in our community,” Farmshare Austin Executive Director Taylor Cook said.

Enrolled students will live and work on the Farmer Starter farm, 10 miles east of Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, for six months. They will learn seed starting, harvesting, marketing, as well as financial and business planning, among other skills.

Farmshare Austin is currently trying to raise $50,000 in an Indiegogo campaign to fund construction and student scholarships. You can learn more about the school on their website.

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally on Saturday and Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend starting at 6:30pm. 

 

KLRU NewsBriefs: E3 Alliance Central Texas Education Profile

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This weekend during PBS NewsHour we talk to the E3 Alliance about their 2014 Central Texas Education Profile, an in-depth report of educational data covering trends and outcomes for the entire Central Texas region.

On Saturday, we talk to Susan Dawson, Executive Director of E3.

“We use [the data] to inform the community and inform better decision making around education, whether it’s for superintendents and school districts, business and community leaders, for nonprofits who work in the education space, policy makers, all of us throughout the region have different pieces of impact on the education space and it’s to inform that impact through objective data,” Dawson said.

Dawson told us Central Texas is unique because of the area’s rapid growth. Texas has the fastest growing student population of all 50 states in the country and Central Texas’ student population is growing at twice the state’s rate, and of that growth, low income students and English Language Learners are growing at twice that rate.

“So the students who we’re working hardest to help succeed are growing at twice the rate of the region which is already twice the rate of the fastest growing state in the entire country,” Dawson emphasized.

On Sunday, we talk to E3′s Director of Policy and Research, Shawn Thomas. Thomas explained some of this year’s findings regarding our region’s dropout rate.

“For the last decade, we’ve seen that our graduation rates for low income students were lower than graduation rates for low income students in the other urban areas across the state including Houston, Dallas, El Paso and San Antonio. But, this year we saw that change for the first time with our 2012 graduation rates,” Thomas said. “We do know that there’s a very strong relationship between attendance and graduation rates and we know that attendance patterns in our region have changed over the past few years as well.”

You can see the entire E3 Alliance Central Texas Education Profile on the organization’s website.

KLRU News Briefs air locally on Saturday and Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend starting at 6:30pm. 

KLRU NewsBriefs air a Texas Tribune Investigation: Hurting for Work

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This weekend during PBS NewsHour we partnered with The Texas Tribune to bring you part of their investigation Hurting for Work You can see extended versions of these stories and other stories in the investigation here.

On Saturday, Texas Tribune Multimedia Reporter Alana Rocha tells the story of Santiago Arias. In 2006 Arias fell two stories to the ground while working for a contractor in Houston. He now has no feeling from the chest down. He only remembers waking up in the hospital.

“I could hear [people in the hospital], but I couldn’t express anything. I could hear them say I was quadriplegic, but I didn’t know what that was,” Arias said.

His employer did not carry workers’ compensation insurance. Texas is the only state in the country that doesn’t require employers to provide coverage.

You can see and read an extended version of Arias’ story here.

On Sunday, part two of the Tribune investigation focuses on Crystal Davis. Davis’ husband, Wayne Davis, died while traveling from their home to a Burger King franchise. He worked as a sales, profit and operations coach for Burger King and was among the 81 percent of Texas workers covered by worker’s compensation insurance.

Davis had to fight to receive payments from the insurance company, which claimed her husband was not working when he died. Just days after The Texas Tribune’s reporting of Davis’ case, the insurance company dropped their lawsuit against Davis and her two children.

You can see and read the extended version of Davis’ story here.

Both stories were produced by The Texas Tribune. They air on KLRU during PBS NewsHour Weekend at 6:30pm on Saturday and Sunday. 

 

KLRU NewsBriefs: Two very different Austin museums mark milestones

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This weekend during PBS NewsHour we have two different indoor activities you can check out: the Harry Ransom Center’s WWI exhibit and the South Austin Pop Culture Center.

On Saturday we peak inside SouthPop, a non-profit museum dedicated to preserving Austin’s music history and the art surrounding that industry. SouthPop’s director Leea Mechling told us this history is more important for residents to know than ever.

“This place is important to give context of Austin’s culture to people who have lived here for a long time and for people who have just moved here. The era of the ’60s and ’70s and ’80s was really a building time of Austin’s unique culture,” Mechling said.

SouthPop is celebrating 10 years this Summer. It is located on South Lamar and is open Thursday through Sunday 1 – 6pm.

Our Sunday story takes you inside the Harry Ransom Center on the University of Texas campus. To commemorate the centennial of the start of World War I, the museum is presenting The World at War: 1914-1918. Some might be surprised to hear about an historical exhibit at the Ransom Center, and curator Jean Cannon said that’s what makes their exhibit unique.

“We have great holdings for literature so a lot of the items that you’ll see in the gallery are diaries or letters and items that give a very personal moment of living between 1914 and 1918,” Cannon told us.

The exhibit runs through August 3. The Harry Ransom Center is free and open to the public.

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend, Saturday and Sunday at 6:30pm. 

KLRU NewsBrief: East Side Company Puts New Spin on Compost

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This Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend we’ll preview a Central Texas Gardener story about an East Austin company offering a fossil fuel-free way to compost.

Since 2012, East Side Compost Pedallers has cycled through 5 neighborhoods to collect residential and commercial compostables. Residential customers pay $4 a week, each opting to spare the landfill and instead nourish their neighborhood farms and urban microgrowers.

East Side Pies pays the Compost Pedallers to pick up their vegetable scraps. They say they’ve even attracted more customers as a result.

“We have a lot of vegetable scrap and instead of it going into a dumpster it goes back into soil and our local community and gets more food for everybody. The fact that we’re taking several hundred pounds of waste out of the landfill I think more than makes up for the small cost that we pay,” Randall Holt of East Side Pies told us.

East Side Compost Pedallers recently won the Austin Green Business Leaders Communication and Outreach award.

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend. An extended version of “Will Pedal for Compost” will air during Central Texas Gardener on July 12 at noon.

KLRU NewsBriefs: Austin’s First Public Montessori School & Huston-Tillotson Receives Largest Donation Ever

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This weekend during PBS NewsHour we have two East Austin education stories.

On Saturday, we’ll introduce you to one of Austin’s newest charter schools and the city’s only public Montessori school: Magnolia Montessori for All. Founder and Principal Sara Cotner told KLRU about why she chose to locate the school in East Austin.

“In Austin there are more than 20 Montessori schools and they’re all private and they’re all west of I-35. East Austin is this beautiful opportunity where there’s a lot of diversity, a lot of different kinds of families, a rich history of commitment to the community,” Ms. Cotner said. “We feel really honored that we were able to find land that was available here and connect with families who were really interested in this vision.”

The school opens August 4th with 3-year-olds through 3rd graders in portable classrooms. They plan to add a grade level every year through 8th grade. Construction is still underway at the site.

On Sunday, we’ll air our conversation with Ada Anderson, an Austin Civil Rights pioneer who donated $3 million this week to Huston-Tillotson University – the largest gift the school has ever received. The funds will be used to build the Sandra Joy Anderson Community Health and Wellness Center (pictured above), a facility which will serve students and surrounding residents. It is named for Mrs. Anderson’s daughter.

“We all know more and more the need for mental health and the plans for the building just fit so perfectly to what [my daughter and her husband] did,” Mrs. Anderson told us. “There are a lot of people [in East Austin] who don’t have a lot of money who I think will be served there so that’s one of the really exciting things to me.”

HT tells us work will begin on the new building very soon.

These stories air on KLRU at 6:30 on Saturday and Sunday evening during PBS NewsHour Weekend. 

 

KLRU News Briefs: Hole in the Wall Turns 40, Artists Beautify North Austin Fence

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KLRU News Briefs are back this weekend during PBS NewsHour after two weeks off. This weekend we’ll hear from a group of local artists who decided to use art to beautify their North Austin neighborhood and about a birthday celebration kicking off this week for the Hole in the Wall’s 40th anniversary.

On Saturday night tune in for an excerpt from the Arts in Context Short Beautiful Fences, the story behind a mural on a fence along Lamar Boulevard between Payton Gin and Rundberg.

“I started out just [painting] “Beauty Will Save the World” in black and white, just the lettering, knowing it would be tagged,” Artist Rigel Thurston tells us. “The people who tagged it…it was too perfect. So, the idea is to include the first round of taggers because they’re part of this neighborhood too.”

On Sunday, the owner of The Hole in the Wall, Will Tanner, tells us about the 40th anniversary party that kicks off on June 19. Plus, he talks about how the bar has evolved over the past four decades.

“The Hole in the Wall is this great place that’s been here a long time and it’s had to change a lot to survive, but I think what has been kept from the past is what makes us great,” Tanner says. Ultimately [this] is a place for like minded, and maybe even not like minded, people to come and enjoy themselves and enjoy live art…eat good food and drink great local beer and just spend some of your life.”

You can find out more about the lineup of bands performing during the celebration here.

KLRU News Briefs air this Saturday and Sunday at 6:30pm during PBS NewsHour Weekend.