GIF or GIF: Our Picks from PBS Digital Studios

Here’s an idea, check out this week’s pick from PBS Digital Studios’ Idea Channel!

Do You Pronounce it GIF or GIF?

So. Whether you like it or not, when you say the word G-I-F, especially on the internet, people are gonna talk about it. Some will correct you, some will correct the people correcting you, it’s the same conversation every time. Over and over and over. Which is why Mike proposed a third pronunciation way back when: Zhaif, or in the IPA: ʒaɪf.

Here’s an Idea: Our picks from PBS Digital Studios

Examine the connections between pop culture, technology and art on this week’s picks from PBS Digital Studios’ Idea Channel.’

Why Are You Ignoring My iMessages?? – Idea Channel

Why are you ignoring my messages? Are read receipts amazing or infuriating? When you check iMessage on your iPhone, iWatch, iMac, iPad and you see a little note that says your friend saw your message, but they aren’t responding. Why are you ignoring my texts?  Also, what’s up with those people with green bubbles? Aren’t they the worst? Join Mike this week on Idea Channel as he takes a deep dive into read receipts and iMessage!

Can You Speak Emoji? – Idea Channel 

Since the popularity of emojis having risen in the past decade, many of these symbols have taken on lives of their own. Which is understandable since no one can get through a text message conversation without using at least one emoji. So does that mean these symbols qualify as a language?

The Vague Horror of Face Swap – Idea Channel 

Face Swapping isn’t new, but it sure is popular these days with things like the Face Swap Challenge, and apps like, FaceSwap Live, MSQRD, and of course, Snapchat. But have you ever noticed that there’s something…weird and horrific about the face swap? Perhaps it’s even an example of the Body Horror genre, especially when face swaps go wrong. Those glitchy face swaps you see on your friend’s story of them having a computer as a face may revealing something about the relationship between humans and computers. What does that say about the way computers see us?