Family Choice: National Geographic Bee 5/27

Each month, KLRU chooses a program for your family to enjoy together.  This month’s Family Choice program is National Geographic Bee on Thursday, May 27, at 10 a.m. and 8 p.m.

The annual National Geographic Bee returns for the 22nd consecutive year with host and moderator Alex Trebek. The 2010 National Geographic Bee will feature 54 fourth- to eighth-graders vying for the Bee crown and the top prize of a $25,000 college scholarship and lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society.

March 2010: Dolly Madison, American Experience

Dolly MadisonDolly Madison, American Experience
8-9:30pm, Monday, March 1

Style icon, extravagant hostess, humanitarian, doting mother, trusted political advisor, and diplomat. These are the roles we now expect in a First Lady, roles created by President James Madison’s wife, Dolley.Born in relative obscurity before the American Revolution, Dolley’s beauty attracted attention, but it was her political acumen that set her apart in a time when women held no overt political power. As the “first First Lady,” she used her unelected position to legitimize the nation’s new capital, to create a political and social style for the new country and to give Americans a sense of their own national identity. As her successors have gone on to do ever since, Dolley Madison adopted social causes of her own, including advocating for children left orphaned by the War of 1812. This portrait features Tony Award-nominee Eve Best (Nurse Jackie) as Dolley Madison and Tony Award-winner Jefferson Mays as James Madison.
For more information go to the American Experience website.

Repeats:
3-4:30am, Tuesday, March 2
2-3:30am, Wednesday, March 3
3-4:30am, Monday, March 8

February 2010: History Detectives

Slave songbookHistory Detectives, Episode #611
8-9pm, Monday, February 23

Slave Songbook – The president of the Mayme A. Clayton Library & Museum in Culver City, California, recently discovered an unusual book in his late mother’s extraordinary collection of African-American artifacts. The small, cloth-bound book, titled Slave Songs of the United States, has a publication date of 1867 and contains a collection of 136 plantation songs. Could this be the first book of African-American spirituals ever published? HISTORY DETECTIVES host Wes Cowan visits a music historian in Los Angeles to explore the coded messages and the melodies that laid the foundation of modern blues, gospel and protest songs of future generations. He also meets with Washington, DC’s Howard University Choir for a special concert of selections from Slave Songs sung in the traditional style of mid-1800s spirituals.

Josh White Guitar – A Michigan man owns a Guild brand acoustic guitar that he says once belonged to legendary African-American folksinger Josh White, who is credited with introducing black folk, gospel and blues music to a world audience in the 1940s. The contributor met White after a concert when he was a kid, and the guitar reminds him of a confidence White had shared with him: the Guild Company was talking to White about making a signature guitar built to his specifications and marketed under his name. If this is the guitar White had spoken of, it would be the first signature guitar ever created for an African-American musician in the United States. HISTORY DETECTIVES host Elyse Luray travels around New York City and New Jersey to explore the crossover appeal of Josh White’s music and his ability to win over a racially polarized music industry.

Birthplace of Hip Hop – A hip hop enthusiast from New York City has always heard that 1520 Sedgwick Avenue in the Bronx is the birthplace of hip-hop. The story goes that on August 11, 1973, DJ Kool Herc, a building resident, was entertaining at his sister’s back- to-school party and tried something new on the turntable: he extended an instrumental beat (breaking or scratching) to let people dance longer (breakdancing) and began MC’ing (rapping) during the extended breakdancing. This, the contributor believes, marked the birth of hip-hop. The music led to an entire cultural movement that’s altered generational thinking – from politics and race to art and language. HISTORY DETECTIVES host Tukufu Zuberi sets out to examine an inner-city environment that helped lay the foundation for a cultural revolution.

Repeats: 4-5am, Sunday, March 1

December 2009: Biscuit Brothers Special

KLRU has great programs for kids and great programs for adults, but it’s not easy to find programs that all family members can enjoy together. Each month, KLRU identifies a Family Choice program from our schedule that will interest and engage family members, ages 7 and up.

This month, KLRU features The Biscuit Brothers holiday specials starting at 5 p.m. on Sunday, December 20.

Musical Celebrations at 5 p.m.
Chanukah, Kwanzaa, Hispanic tradition, birthdays and other holidays and celebrations are explored after Tiny Scarecrow accidentally releases all the holiday melodies from Melody Garden. This song filled special shows how a “holiday” can be a good time to learn about other cultures and traditions and a great time to share your culture and traditions with others.

Merry Musical Christmas at 5:30 p.m.
The whole family will sing and laugh along with this heart-felt musical nod to traditional Christmas specials of the past. Join the Biscuit Brothers and company on Christmas Eve as they use music to celebrate on the magical, musical farm and try to cheer up Tiny Scarecrow who sits high atop Symphony Barn waiting for snow.

Family Choice: Nature "Fellowship of the Whales"

Each month, KLRU chooses a program for your family to enjoy together.  This month’s Family Choice program is Nature “Fellowship of the Whales” on Sunday, Nov. 15, at 7 p.m. The story of the first year of a humpback whale’s life as she learns the lessons of humpback life from her mother. Together, they make the long journey from her birthplace in the suptropical waters in Hawaii to summer feeding grounds in the cold seas off Alaska’s southeast coast. he youngster will meet dangerous orcas and sharks, and playful dolphins and seals.

Family Choice on July 19

KLRU Family Choice
Sunday, July 19, at 4 p.m.
Family Choice web site at klru.org/familychoice

KLRU has great programs for kids and great programs for adults, but it’s not easy to find programs that all family members can enjoy together. Each month, KLRU identifies a Family Choice program from our schedule that will interest and engage family members, ages 7 and up.

This month, KLRU features Peace: The Handraised Polar Bear. On December 2, 1999, a polar bear named Peace was born at Japan’s Tobe Zoological Park. After his mother rejected the cub, zoo keeper Atsuhiro Takaichi took on the task of parenting and subsequently succeeded in hand-raising a polar bear for the first time ever in Japan and just the third time in the world. Peace: The Handraised Polar Bear chronicles five years in the life of the young cub and the caring zoo keeper.

Family Choice: Summer Fun

KLRU Family Choice
Sunday, May 21, from 2 to 6 p.m.

KLRU has great programs for kids and great programs for adults, but it’s not easy to find programs that all family members can enjoy together. Each month, KLRU identifies a Family Choice program from our schedule that will interest and engage family members, ages 7 and up.

This month, KLRU features summer fun documentaries on Sunday, May 31. From 2 to 6 p.m. KLRU will feature: Great Old Amusement Parks, Ice Cream Show, Hot Dog Program, and A Program About Unusual Buildings and Other Roadside Stuff. Find out more about each of these programs at the Family Choice Web site: klru.org/familychoice

Family Choice: This Old House Kids Special

Ask This Old House “Special Projects for Kids: Building a Vegetable Garden”
Saturday, March 28, 5:30 p.m.

Each month, KLRU identifies a Family Choice program from our schedule that will interest and engage family members, ages 7 and up. Keep updated on the Family Choice program-of-the-month and ways your family can build and extend the program through discussion and activities.

The annual kid’s episode features family-friendly projects that parents and kids can build together! Landscape contractor Roger Cook helps a 12-year-old budding gardener build a raised bed for growing vegetables. In the Ask This Old House loft, general contractor Tom Silva and plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey with the help of several kids, build a miniature indoor golf course. Later, host Kevin O’Connor and a middle school teacher show eager students how to build a model rocket launcher using commonly available household and hardware store items.

Step-by-Step: How to Build a Water Rocket