Arts in Context Short: The Latino Comedy Project

“I looked at the absence of Latino voices as a reason to do what I was doing,” says Adrian Villegas, artistic director of The Latino Comedy Project. Living up to their mission of providing a voice for the Latino community, Adrian and the LCP troupe have been providing audiences with political satire that provoke big laughs and offer insight into societal issues affecting communities of color.

 

Bella Muerte, Dulce Vida: A Day of the Dead Tradition

“… it’s just part of learning from our ancestors and learning who we were and where we’re heading to,” says Nayeli Miranda, a sugar skull instructor for the ESB-MACC. With the intent of preserving and sharing her culture, Miranda teaches the art behind sugar skulls, along with its rich history within the Day of the Dead celebration.

 

Arts In Context Shorts: Belonging

“Everything is here for a reason,” says Sally Jacques, artistic director of Blue Lapis Light. Using a combination of stunning aerial dancers swinging from stacks, ground dancers, and haunting projections, Blue Lapis Light’s latest piece “Belonging: Part One” explores the beauty of the earth and the interconnectedness of all life.

 

Arts In Context Shorts: Guild of the Silent Sword

“When I was a youth …, I had no idea that there were any major empires, kingdoms or cities or cultures in Africa,” says Da’Mon Stith, founder of the Guild of the Silent Sword. With the goal of recovering and evolving the lost fighting arts of Africa, Stith created the Guild of the Silent Sword as a way to build community and awaken people’s understanding of African culture. He considers sword play “experimental archaeology” and uses it to feel like part of a larger, human story.

 

Get a look inside Tiny Homes on Arts In Context Shorts

Miniature house builder, Bruce Miller, discusses the origins of his passion for the scaled-down construction and remodeling of petite homes. He explains his process for mini-sized interior design, and the reasoning behind different room furnishings.

 

Building the American Dream wins funding from Latino Public Broadcasting

Building the American Dream, a documentary that tells the stories of the virtually invisible undocumented construction workers in Texas, has been chosen as one of the recipients for funding from Latino Public Broadcasting as part of their 2016 Public Media Content Fund. The documentary is directed and produced by Chelsea Hernandez. KLRU is the presenting station and plans to distribute the film nationally to PBS stations.

Construction is a $72 billion industry in Texas, but beneath the so-called recession proof “Texas Miracle” lies an uncomfortable truth. 1 in 2 workers in Texas are undocumented and face horrendous exploitations. Building the American Dream tells the stories of the virtually invisible undocumented construction workers upon whose hard labor the boom is built and introduces Cristina Tzintzún, an uncompromising young female voice in the labor movement leading the fight for basic rights and safety conditions.

For more information on the documentary visit their website.

 

Save the Date: POV Screening What Tomorrow Brings 8/2

POV

Join us on August 2 as we close our POV Documentary Screenings with What Tomorrow Brings.

This film go deep into the very first WhatTomorrowBringsWeb-300x225girls’ school in a small Afghan village. Never before have fathers allowed their daughters to gain an education; now Taliban threats heighten their misgivings. From the school’s beginning is 2009 to its first graduating class in 2015, this film will take you through the stories of students, teachers, parents, village elders and the school’s founder Razia Jan. While the girlslearn to read and write, their education goes far beyond the classroom as they discover the differences between the lives they were born into and the lives they dream of leading.

This event is FREE and open to the public.

RSVP here.

Save the Date: POV Screening Thank You for Playing 7/12

POV

Join us on July 12 as we continue our POV Documentary Series with the heartfelt documentary Thank You for Playing.

ThankYouForPlayingWeb-300x225When Ryan Green, a video game programmer, learns that his young son Joel has cancer, he and his wife begin documenting their emotional journey with a poetic video game. Thank You for Playing follows Ryan and his family over two years creating “That Dragon, Cancer,” which evolves from a cathartic exercise into a critically acclaimed work of art that sets the gaming industry abuzz. Lauded as “unimaginably intimate” by The New Yorker, the film is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit and the unique ways that art and technology can help us share profound experiences.

This event is FREE and open to the public.

RSVP here.

Arts In Context Shorts: Curating Cosmic Vida

With “Cosmic Vida,” an exhibition at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center, curator Raul Valdez gave visitors a glimpse into the cosmos.

“Cosmic Vida” is the first show Valdez curated in more than a decade. An artist himself, he curated the collection after he realized he could not produce enough work to fill up the space himself. The exhibition, which is no longer on display, juxtaposed dynamic and subdued pieces. With artworks of various mediums, colors, sizes and imagery, he explored the literal and symbolic meaning of the exhibit’s title.

Valdez hoped the audience was inspired to make their own interpretations on the universal experiences of La Raza, the human race.

“You can see the chicano in it, but you can also see the universal part,” Valdez said