KLRU Celebrates Black History Month 2016

KLRU celebrates black history month

KLRU broadcasts programming created by and about people from all cultures year-round, from public affairs to history to independent film to kids programming. In celebration of Black History Month, KLRU and KLRU Q will broadcast a lineup of programs and host events honoring and exploring African American culture.

Join KLRU and the Austin Public Library for the Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the documentary The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution on Tuesday, Feb. 2nd, at 7 p.m. at the Austin Public Library Windsor Park Branch. Get more details

KLRU will be taping another series of Blackademics on February 9th & 10th. Find out how to attend the tapings now.

KLRU will also have preview screenings of Ken Burns’ new documentary on Jackie Robinson in February and early March. More details coming soon. Learn more about the film

 

Here’s what’s on KLRU
Independent Lens A Ballerina’s Tale
Monday, February 8 at 9 pm
Few dancers make it to the highest levels of classical ballet; of that already small number only a fraction of them are black women. Misty Copeland pulled herself up the ladder at American Ballet Theater from studio company to principal dancer, becoming arguably the biggest star in dance today.

The Caged Bird: The Life and Music of Florence B. Price
Monday, February 8 at 10 pm
In 1933, Florence B. Price made music history as the first African-American woman to have her music performed by a major symphony orchestra when the Chicago Symphony premiered her Symphony in E minor at the 1933 World’s Fair. This is the inspiring story of a gifted woman’s triumph over prejudice and preconceptions.

American Masters B.B. King
Friday, February 12 at 8 pm
American Masters premieres a biography about blues legend, the late B. B King.premieres a biography about blues legend, the late B. B King.

Independent Lens The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s Fight for Civil Rights  
Monday, February 15 at 9 pm.
Whitney M. Young, Jr. was one of the most celebrated—and controversial—leaders of the civil rights era. This film follows his journey from segregated Kentucky to head of the National Urban League. Unique among black leaders, he took the fight directly to the powerful white elite, gaining allies in business and government including three presidents.

Vel Phillips: Dream Big Dreams
Monday, February 15 at 10 pm
Discover how Vel Phillips, Milwaukee’s first African American and first female alderman, rose to prominence as one of Wisconsin’s great civil rights activists boasting a list of “firsts” as part of her legacy. These include the first African American judge in Wisconsin and the first woman in the nation to hold executive office in state government.

Finding Your Roots Family Reunions
Tuesday, February 16 at 7 pm
The new season continues with the premiere of episode seven. Uncover family mysteries about two legends of hip hop, Sean Combs and LL Cool J, through the use of DNA technology that reveals information that shakes their very foundations.

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution on Independent Lens
Tuesday, February 16 at 8 pm
Weaving together a treasure trove of rare footage with the voices of a diverse group of people who were there, Stanley Nelson tells the vibrant story of a pivotal movement that feels timely all over again.

Bridging the Divide: Tom Bradley and the Politics of Race
Tuesday, February 16 at 10 pm
Thirty-five years before the election of President Barack Obama, the question of race and the possibility of bridging racial barriers were put to the test in an overlooked story in American politics: Tom Bradley’s 1973 election as Mayor of Los Angeles: the first African American mayor of a major U.S. city with an overwhelmingly white majority. This documentary tells the story of how Bradley’s coalition of African Americans, Jews, white liberals, Latinos and Asian Americans united a divided city, brought inclusion and access, and set the foundation for inter-racial coalitions that encouraged the elections of minority candidates nationwide.

Smitsonian Salutes Ray Charles: In Performance at the White House
Friday, February 26 at 8 pm
Hear interpretations of the music of Ray Charles, using his own big-band musical arrangements, by renowned as well as up-and-coming artists. The performance, a White House partnership with the Smithsonian, airs from the East Room.

Fats Domino: American Masters
Friday, February 26 at 9 pm
Discover how Fats Domino’s brand of New Orleans rhythm and blues became rock ‘n’ roll. As popular in the 1950s as Elvis Presley, Domino suffered degradations in the pre-civil rights South and aided integration through his influential music.

Independent Lens Wilhemina’s War
Monday, February 29 at 9 pm
A Southern grandmother struggles to help her family through a life marked by HIV, but may be unable to save those she loves. AIDS is a grim reality and a leading cause of death for black women in the rural south. 

 

Here’s what’s on KLRUQ

Evening with Sheila Johnson
Saturday, Feb. 6 at 5:30 pm
In an interview with PBS NewsHour journalist, Gwen Ifill, Sheila Johnson discusses her journey from a music student to the co-founder of BET as well as her other successes as a businesswoman.

Black Kung Fu Experience
Saturday, Feb. 6, 10:05 pm & Sunday Feb.7 , 5:55 pm
The African-American pioneers of kungfu and their role in film resonated with African-American communities. Because of these four men, kungfu played an important role in the black experience.

Smokey Robinson and the Miracles: The Definitive Performances
Saturday, Feb. 6, 11:05 pm
Smokey Robinson and the Miracles: The Definitive Performances presents three decades worth of classic archival television appearances by one of the most successful singing groups of all-time. It features interviews and Robinson and the original Miracles who give insight on their songs, Motown and the group’s history.

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson
Sunday, Feb. 7, 6:55 pm
As the son of former slaves, Jack Johnson created a better life for himself as a heavyweight boxer in a Jim Crow America.

One Night In March
Sunday, Feb. 7, 10:34 pm
This award winning documentary tells the story of the integrated Mississippi State basketball team at the dawn of the Civil Rights Movement. Despite their success on the court, they could not compete in the NCAA National Championship because of the unwritten rule in Mississippi that integrated teams could not play all-white teams.

Queen of Swing
Saturday, Feb. 13 at 5:30 pm
Norma Miller was a Harlem-born actress, dancer, choreographer and stand-up comedian. Her biography examines Miller’s influence in the globalization of America’s jazz culture and her role in breaking down racial barriers across the United States and around the world.

Nickles from Heaven
Sunday, Feb. 14, 5:00 pm
The 17 members of the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion, known as the “Triple Nickles,” were among America’s least recognized military pioneers during World War II. This Emmy award winning documentary recounts the experiences of the first African-American soldiers to be designated as U.S. paratroopers and celebrates their long-overlooked contributions to the war effort.

Mary Lou Williams: The Lady Who Swings The Band
Saturday, Feb. 20 at 5:30 pm
Mary Lou Williams (1910-1981), an innovative and prolific jazz pianist, composer and arranger, created some of the most sophisticated big-band hits of the 1930s. She defied expectations as a woman in a “man’s world,” as a black person in a whites-only society, and as a non-conforming creative genius in an image-driven industry.

Marines of Montford Point
Sunday, Feb. 21, 5:02 pm
Hosted and narrated by Academy Award-winning actor Louis Gossett, Jr., this film, profiles the first African Americans recruits in the United States Marine Corps, beginning with their experiences at Montford Point Base, a segregated boot camp in the heart of the Jim Crow South.

Jimi Hendrix: American Masters
Sunday, Feb. 21, 9:30 pm
Directed by two-time Grammy-winner Bob Seaton, this documentary follows the life of Jimmy Hendrix and his artistry. Includes commentary from Paul McCartney, Noel Redding,Mitch Mitchell, Billy Cox, Eddie Kramer, and Steve Winwood.

Caged Bird; The: The Life and Music of Florence B. Price
Saturday, Feb. 27, at 5:30 pm|
In 1933 Florence B Price made music history as the first African-American woman to have her music performed by a major symphony orchestra when the Chicago Symphony premiered her Symphony in E minor at the 1933 World’s Fair. This is the inspiring story of a gifted woman’s triumph over prejudice and preconceptions.

Glory
Saturday, Feb. 27, 8:00 pm
Col. Robert Gould Shaw (Matthew Broderick) trains and leads an all-black regiment of the U.S. Civil War.

Looking Over Jordan: African Americans and the War
Saturday, Feb. 27, 10:05 pm
The Civil War began as a means of preserving the Union. However, to nearly four million African Americans, it held a much more personal promise. This informative documentary chronicles the black experience in the South before, during and after the war.

Soulful Symphony with Darin Atwater: Song in a Strange Land
Saturday, Feb. 27, 11:02 pm
An 85-member African-American Soulful Symphony ensemble performs “Song in a Strange Land,” an anthem that pays tribute to the African-American spirit. The program is led by Darin Atwater, whose work aims to reach a broader audience.

Colored Frames
Sunday, Feb. 28, 5:00 pm
Starting at the height of the Civil Rights Movement up to present day, this program highlights the voices of black artists often overlooked by the mainstream. In these artists’ struggle for visibility, they also face the challenge of defining “blackness” within their own community.

Hines Farm Blues Club
Sunday, Feb. 28, 6:00 pm
In a rural community outside of Toledo, Ohio, Hines Farm held the one of the most premier blues clubs in the country in the late 1950s and throughout the 1960s. This documentary tells the story of the relationship between Hines Farm and Toledo, and how they developed into a hub for blues, jazz, and rhythm and blues.

KLRU Celebrates Black History Month 2015

KLRU celebrates black history month

KLRU broadcasts programming created by and about people from all cultures year-round, from public affairs to history to independent film to kids programming. In celebration of Black History Month, KLRU will broadcast a lineup of programs and host events honoring and exploring African American culture.

The following events will take place during February:

Community Cinema American Denial screening Feb. 3 at 7 pm at the Windsor Park Branch Library. More details

Austin Revealed: Civil Rights Stories screening Feb. 8, 5-7pm at Google Fiber Space 201 Colorado Street, Austin, TX 78701 More details

Blackademics tapings on Feb. 10 & 11, 7 pm at KLRU’s Studio 6A. More details including speaker list

 

Programs airing this month on KLRU:

Shakespeare Uncovered Othello with David Harewood
Friday, February 6 at 9 pm.
In 1997, David Harewood was the first black actor to play Othello on stage at the National Theatre in London. In this episode, he unravels the complex issues of prejudice and jealousy that are threaded throughout the play, as well as returning to the National to meet the most recent actor to take on the role at the theatre, Adrian Lester. Interviews include Simon Russell Beale, Ian McKellen, Julia Stiles and Patrick Stewart.

Antiques Roadshow Celebrating Black Americana
Monday, February 9 at 8 pm.
Highlights include Martin Luther King, Jr. ephemera from 1966; a Madam C.J. Walker beauty book, written by the first female American millionaire; and a trip with host Mark L. Walberg and appraiser Leila Dunbar to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City, Missouri.

Independent Lens Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People
Monday, February 16 at 9 pm
This is the story of the pioneering African-American photographers – men and women, celebrated and anonymous – who have recorded the lives and aspirations of generations, from slavery to the present. By Thomas Allen Harris.

Mr. Civil Rights:  Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP
Monday, February 16 at 10:30 pm.
This documentary incorporates rare archival film and extraordinary interviews to explore Marshall’s life in the years leading up to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling. This compelling biography unfolds through interviews with Justice Elena Kagan, Justice John Paul Stevens, lawyer and civil-rights activist Vernon Jordan, Marshall biographers Rawn James, Juan Williams and Larry S. Gibson, and several law professors.

American Masters August Wilson: The Ground on Which I Stand
Friday, February 20 at 8 pm
From his roots as an activist and poet to his indelible mark on Broadway, this program captures the legacy of the man some call America’s Shakespeare. Film and theater luminaries such as James Earl Jones, Viola Davis, Phylicia Rashad, Laurence Fishburne, Charles Dutton and others share their stories of the career and experience of bringing Wilson’s rich theatrical voice to the stage.

Austin Revealed
Friday, February 20 at 9:30 pm
This documentary presents interviews with prominent Austin citizens about their experience during Austin’s civil rights period, the effect of segregation and what gentrification has meant to the city.

Independent Lens American Denial
Monday, February 23 at 9 pm
“American Denial” uses the story of Gunnar Myrdal’s 1944 investigation of Jim Crow racism as a springboard to explore the power of unconscious biases and how the ideals of liberty, equality and justice still affect notions of race and class today.

The Rule
Monday, February 23 at 10 pm.
This documentary tells a rare story of success. In Newark, New Jersey,where the average high school graduation rate is abysmal, St. Benedict’s Prep is the exception – with a near 100 percent college acceptance rate. Filmmakers Marylou and Jerome Bongiorno profile the school and the Benedictine monks of Newark Abbey to see how they achieve success among a vulnerable population of inner-city African-American and Latino teenage boys.

Austin Revealed: Civil Right Stories screening 2/8

austin revealed

In commemoration of Black History Month, please join Alpheus Media, KLRU, and Black Googler Network for a special screening and discussion of KLRU’s Austin Revealed: Civil Rights Stories.

DATE: Sunday, Feb. 8
TIME: 5-7 pm
LOCATION: Google Fiber Space 201 Colorado Street, Austin, TX 78701
COST: Free, RSVP required. RSVP now Drinks and light bites will be provided.

This documentary presents interviews with prominent Austin citizens about their experience during Austin’s civil rights period, the effect of segregation and what gentrification has meant to the city. Panelists will expand on their experiences featured in the film and answer audience questions.

Blackademics 2015 2/10 & 2/11

blackademics tv

Join KLRU for the 2015 Blackademics event and taping! The Black Studies theme for Season 3 is The African Diaspora. Black Studies is concerned with the histories, politics and cultures of people of African origin in Africa and throughout the African diaspora.

These free talks will be recorded to air in upcoming episodes of Blackademics Television.
Date: Tuesday, February 10th and Wednesday, February 11th
Time: 7 pm (doors open at 6:30 pm)
Location: KLRU’s Studio 6A (map)
Cost: The event is free and no RSVP is required.

Tuesday, February 10th
Jazz Collective Band
Scot Brown
Michael Scantlebury
Courtney Robinson
Zeta Elliot
Shana Redmond
Kevin Foster
Kali Gross
Natalie Cofield

Wednesday, February 11th
Jazz Collective Band
Kashi Johnson
Tami Navarro
Johnathan Gayles
Elizabeth Chin
Bertin Louis
Kevin Foster
Ted Gordon
Whitney Battle

Blackademics Television is an ongoing project to bring engaging Black Studies scholarship to broad popular audiences via Public Television and New Media. This year’s tapings features 12-minute presentations each night by scholars and artists from around the country. Watch other Blackademics talks now

 

Austin Revealed: Bertha Means & the Ice Palace

In honor of Black History Month, Austin Revealed features stories of Austin’s civil rights history told through first person interviews.

Bertha Means and her daughter Joan Khabele tell the story of how being turned away from a skating rink in Austin propelled them to action.

KLRU’s Austin Revealed is an online oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. Watch more Austin Revealed

Austin Revealed: Wilhelmina Delco on Politics & Desegregation

In honor of Black History Month, Austin Revealed features stories of Austin’s civil rights history told through first person interviews.

Wilhelmina Delco, the first African American elected to public office in Austin, Texas, recounts why it was important for her to run for the school board.

KLRU’s Austin Revealed is an online oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. Watch more Austin Revealed

Austin Revealed: Segregation/Desegregation Stories

In honor of Black History Month, Austin Revealed features stories of Austin’s civil rights history told through first person interviews.

When Austin schools were desegregated in 1971, the traditional African-American schools were closed. It devastated the community and the impact lingers today.

KLRU’s Austin Revealed is an online oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. Watch more Austin Revealed

Austin Revealed: Gary Bledsoe on Police Violence

In honor of Black History Month, Austin Revealed features stories of Austin’s civil rights history told through first person interviews.

Gary Bledsoe recounts stories of police violence against African Americans and why he think the issue still exists today.

KLRU’s Austin Revealed is an online oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. Watch more Austin Revealed

Austin Revealed: Hoover Alexander & Entrepreneurship

In honor of Black History Month, Austin Revealed features stories of Austin’s civil rights history told through first person interviews.

Hoover Alexander has a long history in the restaurant business. He talks about the historical necessity for African Americans to start their own businesses and why an unintended consequence of integration is less entrepreneurs.

KLRU’s Austin Revealed is an online oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. Watch more Austin Revealed

Austin Revealed: Linda Conner on Gentrification

In honor of Black History Month, Austin Revealed features stories of Austin’s civil rights history told through first person interviews.

Linda Conner has witnessed decades of change in east Austin. Now, gentrification is creating a rift in this once predominantly African-American community.

KLRU’s Austin Revealed is an online oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. Watch more Austin Revealed