Austin Revealed: Food As Community

plate

Food brings people and communities together and as part of a new Austin Revealed series, we set out to bring you the stories behind some Austin immigrants and how they have built unconventional families and communities using cuisine from their homeland.

Taste of Ethiopia

Woinee always wanted to open up a restaurant, but she had no idea it would be in Texas, or that it would end up serving a host of local families who have adopted children from Ethiopia. Now Woinee’s dream is helping dozens of children discover—and taste—their heritage and culture.

In this explainer, learn about injera—a staple item of Ethiopian cuisine—and how to make it.

Peace Bakery & Deli

Nuha says that while she was never treated differently in her small east Texas town, she felt wearing her hijab set her apart, making her stand out. But after opening her first restaurant, her culture has only helped her connect with more and more people from a variety of backgrounds.

Tropicana Cuban Cafe

Enrique Reyes spent his childhood helping in his family’s bakeries and restaurants in Miami, so it’s little wonder he set up shop when he moved to Texas. What is surprising is what happens when the kitchen closes and the floor opens up. Tropicana transforms into a dance hall, where a particular Cuban style of salsa is taught—after some Cuban coffee, of course.

Get a little boost with this explainer on Cuban cafécitos, a caffeinated treat that’s different from your regular espresso shot.

Little Mama’s Authentic Filipino Cuisine

Nita and Joanna have always been close, but after opening up a restaurant featuring food from her mom’s home country, the two have become even tighter knit. It’s become a way to share a future together and reflect on a past that stretches back to Spanish colonization.

You’ve probably never had dessert like this before! In this explainer learn about some of the most popular Filipino desserts.

Mister Tramps Sports Pub and Cafe

With start times as early as 6 a.m., it’s hard to be a soccer fan living in central time zone. So what is it that pulls these fans out of bed and into the pub? A sense of community. Owner Alfredo Cedrone modeled the bar off locations in his native Scotland, where pubs aren’t just where you watch the match—it’s where the local community gathers.

Roland’s Soul Food & Fish

Austin Revealed went live on Facebook for lunch from Roland’s Soul Food & Fish. We tried different dishes from pork chops to fried catfish and bbq to oxtails. Experience it with us in the video below.

What restaurants make you feel like you’re home?

Austin Revealed: Coach Robinson

Did you know that #42 Jackie Robinson coached BASKETBALL in Austin? Robinson spent a year at Huston-Tilloston University as a coach an also served on the school’s board for many years.  Learn how Robinson ended up in Austin and hear from one of the players Robinson coached.

Our video features:
Roland Harden, who played for Robinson the year that he coached.  Harden likes to say he never formally played basketball before college; he played ‘street ball,’ playing pickup games and with local groups.  Harden credits Robinson for his success in life — the basketball scholarship Robinson offered Harden allowed him to stay in school and become an educator.  He still lives in east Austin.

LaToya Devezin, who is the African American Community Archivist for the Austin History Center and a self-professed baseball fan.

For more historical background, here is a clip from Ken Burns’ Jackie Robinson documentary on Robinson’s court martial from Camp Hood.

Highlights May 8-13

KLRU Highlights

On Call the Midwife Episode #506, see the consequences of a woman’s decision not to report a rape and a mother’s decision to conceal her daughter’s pregnancy. Sunday at 7 p.m., Shelagh and Timothy secretly organize a long-overdue family camping holiday.

Sunday at 8 p.m., the case of a missing Swede in South Africa leads Wallander down a dangerous path on Wallander Season 4 On Masterpiece The White Lioness. Worst of all, he’s having blackouts.

The Whiteleys deal starts to look bad on Mr. Selfridge Season 4 On Masterpiece Episode 7. A reporter confronts Jimmy. Grove undertakes a good deed and a new project before retiring. Harry and Mae also retire. Tune in Sunday at 9 p.m.!

On Independent Lens Peace Officer, Meet Dub Lawrence, a crusading former sheriff whose investigations highlight the increasingly militarized state of American police. Monday at 8 p.m., learn how he established Utah’s first SWAT team, only to see that same unit kill his son-in-law in a controversial standoff.

Meet two Christians – an Evangelical anti-abortion activist and an African-American mother whose son was murdered – who find common ground in the fight against the rising tide of gun violence on Independent Lens The Armor Of Light Tuesday at 7 p.m.

Hosted by Carlos Watson, founder of the the news site Ozy.com, Point Taken Episode #105 will feature a debate about current hot-button issues Tuesday at 10 p.m.

Tuesday at 10 p.m., review a transitional year in the life of farmer, slow food advocate and sansei David “Mas” Masumoto, and his relationship with his daughter Nikiko, who returns to the family farm with the intention of stepping into her father’s work boots on Changing Season: On The Matsumoto Family Farm.

Wednesday at 7 p.m., earn the value of teamwork among animal partners, even ones as odd but perfect as hippo and fish on Nature Nature’s Perfect Partners. Sea and land animals collaborate using brainpower to solve complex problems and stay alive.

Wednesday at 8 p.m., join NOVA Bombing Hitler’s Supergun as engineers, archaeologists, and WWII historians investigate Hitler’s supergun. And discover the two audacious missions designed to destroy the seemingly impregnable supergun complex, one of which is led by none other than Joseph Kennedy, Jr.

In the first two years of the war, Hitler’s Germany crushes its enemies in a series of lightning offensives. A new word is coined to describe this incredible string of successes; ‘Blitzkrieg’ or ‘Lightning War’. Learn about Hitler’s technical prowess on Nazi Mega Weapons Blitzkrieg Wednesday at 9 p.m.

Wednesday and Friday at 10 p.m. on Austin City Limits Gary Clark Jr./Courtney Barnett. experience the contemporary R&B of Austin’s Gary Clark Jr. as he plays songs from his album The Story of Sonny Boy Slim. Rocking Australian singer/songwriter Courtney Barnett performs tunes from her LP Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit.

On Overheard with Evan Smith Jeffrey Goldberg, Smith interviews the a national correspondent for The Atlantic Thursday at 7 p.m. Goldberg’s most recent Atlantic article was a long-read on President Obama’s foreign policy legacy called “The Obama Doctrine.” It appears in the magazine’s April 2016 issue.

On Stories of the Mind The Critical Years, four stories from young adults show a range of mental health experiences Thursday at 7:30 p.m. This is a critical age, marked by major life transitions at a time when many disorders tend to manifest.

Stories of the Mind Ways To Wellness will show you five ways for every viewer to achieve optimum mental fitness, told through the personal experiences of fascinating, diverse characters Thursday at 8 p.m.

On The Daytripper New Braunfels, Tx, Chet explores this old German town built along two pristine rivers Thursday at 8:30 p.m.

Watch Civic Summit Austin’s Latino Identity, a townhall examining challenges and celebrating contributions made by Austin’s Latino population Thursday at 9 p.m.

On Austin Revealed El Despertar, explore the struggle of the Chicano movement as the Mexican-American community in Austin, TX unites to fight for quality education, equal representation, and respect for their diverse culture Thursday at 10 p.m.

On American Masters Janis Joplin, observe Janis Joplin’s life through intimate letters and rare footage in the first in-depth celebration of the iconic rock singer Friday at 8 p.m.

Style up with indoor succulents as living decor and meet Army base families uniting around gardens on Central Texas Gardener at noon Saturday.

Experience an hour of contemporary hip-hop from a Grammy-nominated superstar on Austin City Limits Kendrick Lamar. The Compton rapper plays songs from his acclaimed LP, To Pimp a Butterfly, alongside his hits Saturday at 7 p.m.

In the Studio: A Discussion about Austin’s Latino Identity 4/6

Civic Summit Taping Announcement

For generations, Latinos have shaped Austin’s culture, and in recent years the number of people who identify as Latino has surged. Join moderator Josefina Casati, Editor of ¡Ahora Sí!, as we examine the challenges Austin’s Latino population faces, and discuss how this community contributes to the tapestry of our city. 

Wednesday, April 6
6:30pm Doors | 7pm Start
KLRU Studio 6A (map)
RSVP
This event is free but an RSVP is required

Have a question or topic you’d like to pose to our panelists on this subject? Email us at: civicsummit@klru.org

Civic Summit: Austin’s Latino Identity will air on KLRU on May 12, 2016 at 9pm

Want to learn more about Austin’s Chicano heritage? KLRU’s Austin Revealed: Chicano Civil Rights tells the story of Austin’s Chicano history through first-person accounts of civil rights leaders.

Austin Revealed: Chicano activism & organizing

Inspired by a push for labor reform, hear about how the Chicano movement gained momentum during the 60s and 70s in Austin.

Austin Revealed: Chicano Civil Rights debuts on Thursdays in March on KLRU.org. Watch all episodes now Other installments address the rise of Mexican-Americans in politics, Chicano identity through the arts, organizing and activism and the struggle of the Chicano movement as the Mexican-American community in Austin continues to fight for their rights.

Austin Revealed: Chicano Civil Rights screening 3/31

KLRU’s newest installment of Austin Revealed focuses on Chicano Civil Rights. We will present four short pieces online each Thursday in March followed by the broadcast of an hour-long documentary on March 31. We have also partnered with The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center to present a screening and discussion of the documentary on March 31 as part of their César Chávez celebrations.

The screening will be Thursday, March 31 at The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center. Film starts at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The event is free, but an RSVP is required. RSVP now

Cojunto Aztlan courtesy Juan Tejeda

Cojunto Aztlan courtesy Juan Tejeda

The documentary explores the struggle of the Chicano movement of the 60s and 70s. Austin Revealed shows how the Mexican-American community of Austin united to fight for quality education, equal representation, and respect for their diverse culture.Through first person interviews, hear how these individuals made a lasting impact through empowerment, sacrifices, accomplishments and failures.

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. This is the fourth installment of the series, which began in 2014. Past stories include Civil Rights Stories, The Jewish Experience and Pioneers from the East. Watch these stories now

The newest documentary Chicano Civil Rights features interviews with a long list of Austin civil rights leaders about their experience at the time. Interview subjects include:

  • Susana Almanza – Brown Beret and activist
  • Gonzalo Barrientos – former Texas State Senator and State Representative
  • Ernesto Calderon – former staff at Juarez Lincoln University and Raza Unida Party member
  • Martha Cotera – community leader and educator
  • Marcos De Leon – former Travis County Commissioner Precinct 4 and community leader
  • Ernesto Fraga – Brown Beret and owner of El Tiempo Newspaper
  • Margaret Gomez – first female Mexican-American elected official in Travis County and currently the Travis County Commissioner Precinct 4
  • Dr. Jose Angel Gutierrez – professor, MAYO founder, and Raza Unida Party Founder
  • Dr. Jose Limon – former professor at the University of Texas and currently a professor at the University of Notre Dame
  • Maria Elena Martinez – former chair of Raza Unida Party and educator
  • Richard Moya – first Mexican-American elected official in Travis County and former Travis County Commissioner Precinct 4
  • Hortensia Palomares – UT student movement and community leader
  • Alan Pogue – former UT student, photojournalist and activist
  • Sabino “Pio” Renteria – Brown Beret and currently the Austin City Council member in District 3
  • Gilbert Rivera – Brown Beret and activist
  • Pete Rivera – Brown Beret, executive committee member of the Austin Sierra Club
  • Zeke Romo – former journalist for the Echo newspaper
  • Velia Sanchez-Ruiz – educator and activist
  • Juan Tejeda – former UT student, musician and activist; member of Conjunto Aztlan
  • John Trevino – first Mexican-American elected to Austin City Council
  • Modesta Trevino – educator and arts activist
  • Raul Valdez – artist and activist
  • Dr. Emilio Zamora – professor at The University of Texas  and community leader

Austin Revealed is made possible in part by support from EasyCare Customer Care and the Foundation for Global Sports Development.

Behind the story | Austin Revealed: Pioneers of the East

austin revealed

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area – the Sing family, the Wong family and the Lung family. In addition, Austin Revealed takes you inside Austin’s Asian American Resource Center, a community center focusing on celebrating Austin’s unique Asian community.

We sat down with filmmaker Tim Tsai, who partnered with KLRU on the project, to talk about his passion for Asian American history, why it’s important to Austin and why he got involved with this project.

Watch the four-part series here:
The Wong Family | The Lung Family | The Sing Family Austin’s Asian American Resource Center

What initially attracted you to this project, and what made you decide to get involved?

Tim Tsai

Tim Tsai

As a filmmaker, I’ve always had an interest in exploring Asian American identities as well as an interest in history. When the funding came through for this project, [KLRU] thought of me as a potential partner. I was completely on board. I didn’t know that much about these particular families’ history, but just knowing how long they’ve been here in Austin was already a surprise to me, and I definitely was curious to find out more, to find out what these families’ experiences were like as immigrants. I was very excited to take on this project and to be able to profile these families.

Why do you think it’s important to tell these stories?

I think these stories, particularly minority history, is overlooked. When you look at history textbooks and the curriculum in schools, the non-majority history is often barely mentioned. I bet if you ask Austinites today when the first Asians settled in Austin, they would maybe think since the ‘40s, ‘50s, ‘60s. Not a lot of people know about the earliest Asian immigrants here. Because of the Chinese Exclusion Act (a United States federal law signed in1882 which prohibited all immigration of Chinese laborers), the Chinese population here, most of whom came to work on the railroads, that population was not allowed to grow. We were a small minority here. But a few of these families did come here, did decide to make Austin their home, and so their stories are very much visible when you talk about Texas history in general. Texans love their history, but certain parts of it are often overlooked.

What did you learn from this project?

I had kind of assumed when there’s such a small number of Chinese Americans here, I would have thought they would band together and be very close. Some of these families did know each other for multiple generations, but really, these three families we profiled, one of them ran a laundry, the other one ran a restaurant, the other one ran a grocery store. They were in different businesses. They lived in different parts of town. They had to integrate. There was no way they could survive if they just kept to their own community, so they all integrated very well into Austin.

What’s also very fascinating is that all these different families have a different connection to their Chinese ancestry. I thought it was fantastic that the Sing family, they identify as Hispanic today, and they’re very proud of their heritage. The Lung family, today, you cannot really identify them just by looking at them that they’re Chinese American. The Wong family, who looks Chinese because subsequent generations did marry Chinese, but what’s interesting is that Dr. Mitchel Wong, he married a first-generation immigrant from Taiwan. There was a cultural difference there. Being first-generation versus third-generation is a big difference.

I came into it expecting some of these episodes to maybe be repetitive, that their stories may be very similar, but I found the opposite, that their stories are actually very different, very unique. They all had different ways of integrating into this community and making their lives here.

What do you think people should take away from this project?

Asian American history and Chinese American history is very diverse. We have very different stories. These communities are not all homogeneous. Each family has their own story to tell. And their story is important. The story of how Chinese Texans came here and how they’ve contributed to our community here is important to document and remember and celebrate.

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – The Wong Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Wong Family
Growing up as part of one of the first families of Chinese descent in Austin, Dr. Mitchel Wong “wasn’t looking for prejudice, wasn’t looking for any animosity, and didn’t see any animosity.” In this documentary, Wong recounts his family’s immigrant history as a member of the “Pershing Chinese” and his personal journey from grocery boy to ophthalmologist.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Sing family and the Lung family.

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – Lung Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Lung Family
As an employee at the Texas Capitol Gift Shop, Joe Michael Lung meets visitors from around the globe. But for him, none of those places compare to Texas. In this documentary, Joe and his sister Meiling Lung tell stories of their grandfather, Joe Lung, and their father, Sam P. Lung—beloved restauranteurs in the community and members of one of the first families of Chinese descent in Austin.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Sing family and the Wong family.

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – The Sing Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin Revealed, Pioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Sing Family
Mary Frances Aguallo and her grandson Raul Aguallo Hernandez always knew they were of Chinese descent, but the fragments of their history finally began to come together with the discovery of a lost box in an attic. In this documentary, the two explore their dual identity as Mexican American and Chinese American as part of the Sing family, one of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in Austin.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Wong family and the Lung family.