In the Studio: A Discussion about Austin’s Latino Identity 4/6

Civic Summit Taping Announcement

For generations, Latinos have shaped Austin’s culture, and in recent years the number of people who identify as Latino has surged. Join moderator Josefina Casati, Editor of ¡Ahora Sí!, as we examine the challenges Austin’s Latino population faces, and discuss how this community contributes to the tapestry of our city. 

Wednesday, April 6
6:30pm Doors | 7pm Start
KLRU Studio 6A (map)
RSVP
This event is free but an RSVP is required

Have a question or topic you’d like to pose to our panelists on this subject? Email us at: civicsummit@klru.org

Civic Summit: Austin’s Latino Identity will air on KLRU on May 12, 2016 at 9pm

Want to learn more about Austin’s Chicano heritage? KLRU’s Austin Revealed: Chicano Civil Rights tells the story of Austin’s Chicano history through first-person accounts of civil rights leaders.

Austin Revealed: Chicano activism & organizing

Inspired by a push for labor reform, hear about how the Chicano movement gained momentum during the 60s and 70s in Austin.

Austin Revealed: Chicano Civil Rights debuts on Thursdays in March on KLRU.org. Watch all episodes now Other installments address the rise of Mexican-Americans in politics, Chicano identity through the arts, organizing and activism and the struggle of the Chicano movement as the Mexican-American community in Austin continues to fight for their rights.

Austin Revealed: Chicano Civil Rights screening 3/31

KLRU’s newest installment of Austin Revealed focuses on Chicano Civil Rights. We will present four short pieces online each Thursday in March followed by the broadcast of an hour-long documentary on March 31. We have also partnered with The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center to present a screening and discussion of the documentary on March 31 as part of their César Chávez celebrations.

The screening will be Thursday, March 31 at The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center. Film starts at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The event is free, but an RSVP is required. RSVP now

Cojunto Aztlan courtesy Juan Tejeda

Cojunto Aztlan courtesy Juan Tejeda

The documentary explores the struggle of the Chicano movement of the 60s and 70s. Austin Revealed shows how the Mexican-American community of Austin united to fight for quality education, equal representation, and respect for their diverse culture.Through first person interviews, hear how these individuals made a lasting impact through empowerment, sacrifices, accomplishments and failures.

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. This is the fourth installment of the series, which began in 2014. Past stories include Civil Rights Stories, The Jewish Experience and Pioneers from the East. Watch these stories now

The newest documentary Chicano Civil Rights features interviews with a long list of Austin civil rights leaders about their experience at the time. Interview subjects include:

  • Susana Almanza – Brown Beret and activist
  • Gonzalo Barrientos – former Texas State Senator and State Representative
  • Ernesto Calderon – former staff at Juarez Lincoln University and Raza Unida Party member
  • Martha Cotera – community leader and educator
  • Marcos De Leon – former Travis County Commissioner Precinct 4 and community leader
  • Ernesto Fraga – Brown Beret and owner of El Tiempo Newspaper
  • Margaret Gomez – first female Mexican-American elected official in Travis County and currently the Travis County Commissioner Precinct 4
  • Dr. Jose Angel Gutierrez – professor, MAYO founder, and Raza Unida Party Founder
  • Dr. Jose Limon – former professor at the University of Texas and currently a professor at the University of Notre Dame
  • Maria Elena Martinez – former chair of Raza Unida Party and educator
  • Richard Moya – first Mexican-American elected official in Travis County and former Travis County Commissioner Precinct 4
  • Hortensia Palomares – UT student movement and community leader
  • Alan Pogue – former UT student, photojournalist and activist
  • Sabino “Pio” Renteria – Brown Beret and currently the Austin City Council member in District 3
  • Gilbert Rivera – Brown Beret and activist
  • Pete Rivera – Brown Beret, executive committee member of the Austin Sierra Club
  • Zeke Romo – former journalist for the Echo newspaper
  • Velia Sanchez-Ruiz – educator and activist
  • Juan Tejeda – former UT student, musician and activist; member of Conjunto Aztlan
  • John Trevino – first Mexican-American elected to Austin City Council
  • Modesta Trevino – educator and arts activist
  • Raul Valdez – artist and activist
  • Dr. Emilio Zamora – professor at The University of Texas  and community leader

Austin Revealed is made possible in part by support from EasyCare Customer Care and the Foundation for Global Sports Development.

Behind the story | Austin Revealed: Pioneers of the East

austin revealed

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area – the Sing family, the Wong family and the Lung family. In addition, Austin Revealed takes you inside Austin’s Asian American Resource Center, a community center focusing on celebrating Austin’s unique Asian community.

We sat down with filmmaker Tim Tsai, who partnered with KLRU on the project, to talk about his passion for Asian American history, why it’s important to Austin and why he got involved with this project.

Watch the four-part series here:
The Wong Family | The Lung Family | The Sing Family Austin’s Asian American Resource Center

What initially attracted you to this project, and what made you decide to get involved?

Tim Tsai

Tim Tsai

As a filmmaker, I’ve always had an interest in exploring Asian American identities as well as an interest in history. When the funding came through for this project, [KLRU] thought of me as a potential partner. I was completely on board. I didn’t know that much about these particular families’ history, but just knowing how long they’ve been here in Austin was already a surprise to me, and I definitely was curious to find out more, to find out what these families’ experiences were like as immigrants. I was very excited to take on this project and to be able to profile these families.

Why do you think it’s important to tell these stories?

I think these stories, particularly minority history, is overlooked. When you look at history textbooks and the curriculum in schools, the non-majority history is often barely mentioned. I bet if you ask Austinites today when the first Asians settled in Austin, they would maybe think since the ‘40s, ‘50s, ‘60s. Not a lot of people know about the earliest Asian immigrants here. Because of the Chinese Exclusion Act (a United States federal law signed in1882 which prohibited all immigration of Chinese laborers), the Chinese population here, most of whom came to work on the railroads, that population was not allowed to grow. We were a small minority here. But a few of these families did come here, did decide to make Austin their home, and so their stories are very much visible when you talk about Texas history in general. Texans love their history, but certain parts of it are often overlooked.

What did you learn from this project?

I had kind of assumed when there’s such a small number of Chinese Americans here, I would have thought they would band together and be very close. Some of these families did know each other for multiple generations, but really, these three families we profiled, one of them ran a laundry, the other one ran a restaurant, the other one ran a grocery store. They were in different businesses. They lived in different parts of town. They had to integrate. There was no way they could survive if they just kept to their own community, so they all integrated very well into Austin.

What’s also very fascinating is that all these different families have a different connection to their Chinese ancestry. I thought it was fantastic that the Sing family, they identify as Hispanic today, and they’re very proud of their heritage. The Lung family, today, you cannot really identify them just by looking at them that they’re Chinese American. The Wong family, who looks Chinese because subsequent generations did marry Chinese, but what’s interesting is that Dr. Mitchel Wong, he married a first-generation immigrant from Taiwan. There was a cultural difference there. Being first-generation versus third-generation is a big difference.

I came into it expecting some of these episodes to maybe be repetitive, that their stories may be very similar, but I found the opposite, that their stories are actually very different, very unique. They all had different ways of integrating into this community and making their lives here.

What do you think people should take away from this project?

Asian American history and Chinese American history is very diverse. We have very different stories. These communities are not all homogeneous. Each family has their own story to tell. And their story is important. The story of how Chinese Texans came here and how they’ve contributed to our community here is important to document and remember and celebrate.

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – The Wong Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Wong Family
Growing up as part of one of the first families of Chinese descent in Austin, Dr. Mitchel Wong “wasn’t looking for prejudice, wasn’t looking for any animosity, and didn’t see any animosity.” In this documentary, Wong recounts his family’s immigrant history as a member of the “Pershing Chinese” and his personal journey from grocery boy to ophthalmologist.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Sing family and the Lung family.

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – Lung Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Lung Family
As an employee at the Texas Capitol Gift Shop, Joe Michael Lung meets visitors from around the globe. But for him, none of those places compare to Texas. In this documentary, Joe and his sister Meiling Lung tell stories of their grandfather, Joe Lung, and their father, Sam P. Lung—beloved restauranteurs in the community and members of one of the first families of Chinese descent in Austin.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Sing family and the Wong family.

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – The Sing Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin Revealed, Pioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Sing Family
Mary Frances Aguallo and her grandson Raul Aguallo Hernandez always knew they were of Chinese descent, but the fragments of their history finally began to come together with the discovery of a lost box in an attic. In this documentary, the two explore their dual identity as Mexican American and Chinese American as part of the Sing family, one of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in Austin.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Wong family and the Lung family.

Austin Revealed: Austin’s Asian American Resource Center

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area – the Sing family, the Wong family and the Lung family.

In addition, Austin Revealed takes you inside Austin’s Asian American Resource Center, a community center focusing on celebrating Austin’s unique Asian community.

The AARC
Austin’s Asian American Resource Center, or AARC, truly embraces Austin’s unique community of Asian people from all over the world. Acting as a bridge between the Asian American community and Austin, the center is one of the most utilized in the city. The AARC provides programs for senior citizens, activities for families, cultural and art exhibits and much more.

Screening Austin Revealed Pioneers from the East 5/27

austin revealed

Join us for a screening of
Austin Revealed: Pioneers from the East

Join KLRU and the Asian American Resource Center as we premiere the latest videos from our ongoing Austin Revealed series. The new videos explore the first Chinese families to settle in Austin. Produced in partnership with the Austin History Center, these videos tell the stories of four generations of prominent Chinese American families still living in Central Texas through first person interviews and archival material.

Wednesday, May 27th
Doors 6:30pm | Screening & discussion 7-8pm

Asian American Resource Center
8401 Cameron Rd, Austin, TX 78754

Asian Americans are the fastest growing ethnic group in Texas and nationwide, outpacing Hispanics. While most of this growth is due to recent immigration, the first wave of Asianmigration goes back to the mid 1800’s, when Chinese workers were brought in to work in gold mines and on the railroad. Some of these workers settled in Texas, but in a state that is fanatic about preserving and celebrating its history, very little is known about these pioneering AsianAmericans.

Austin Revealed is an ongoing video project that highlights stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

This event is part of our work to celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

Austin Revealed screening sponsors

Austin Revealed: Civil Right Stories screening 2/8

austin revealed

In commemoration of Black History Month, please join Alpheus Media, KLRU, and Black Googler Network for a special screening and discussion of KLRU’s Austin Revealed: Civil Rights Stories.

DATE: Sunday, Feb. 8
TIME: 5-7 pm
LOCATION: Google Fiber Space 201 Colorado Street, Austin, TX 78701
COST: Free, RSVP required. RSVP now Drinks and light bites will be provided.

This documentary presents interviews with prominent Austin citizens about their experience during Austin’s civil rights period, the effect of segregation and what gentrification has meant to the city. Panelists will expand on their experiences featured in the film and answer audience questions.