Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month 2016

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, and we’re celebrating with KLRU, KLRU Q and online programming!

On KLRU, look out for these shows this month:

Monday, May 2 at 10:30 p.m., don’t miss Our American Family: The Furutas. Through hard work, the Furutas, a Japanese American family of Wintersburg, CA established a successful goldfish farm, only to have their business devastated and family separated in the wake of WWII. Following years in an Arizona relocation camp, their indomitable spirit prevails as they return home and band together to pursue the American dream a second time.

Review a transitional year in the life of farmer, slow food advocate and sansei David “Mas” Masumoto, and his relationship with his daughter Nikiko, who returns to the family farm with the intention of stepping into her father’s work boots Tuesday, May 10 at 10:30 p.m. on Changing Season: On The Matsumoto Family Farm.

 POV The World Before Her tells the tale of two Indias on Monday, May 16 at 10 p.m. In one, Ruhi Singh is a small-town girl competing in Bombay to win the Miss India pageant — a ticket to stardom in a country wild about beauty contests. In the other India, Prachi Trivedi is the young, militant leader of a fundamentalist Hindu camp for girls, where she preaches violent resistance to Western culture, Christianity and Islam. 

In 1975, Giap, a pregnant Vietnamese refugee, escapes Saigon in a boat and within weeks is working on an assembly line in Indiana. Decades later, her aspiring filmmaker son documents her final day of work at America’s last ironing board factory Giap’s Last Day at the Ironing Board Factory. Tune in Tuesday, May 17 at 10:30 p.m.

Chinese Couplets is a riveting, personal story with many layers that takes us from California to Cuba, Hawaii and China.  Part memoir, part history, part investigation, filmmaker Felicia Lowe searches for answers about her mother’s emigration to America during the Chinese Exclusion era. The film airs Tuesday, May 24 at 10:30 p.m.

Asia Society Texas Center:  Building Bridges of Understanding explores how famed Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi’s landmark building came to fruition in Houston’s Museum District Tuesday, May 31 at 10:30 p.m. It examines the history of the organization, the design and construction of this one-of-a-kind cultural center in Houston, Texas.

On KLRU Q, Lucky Chow will air on the following Saturdays at 5:30 p.m.:

Lucky Chow Koreatown U.S.A. visits New York and Los Angeles – home to the two largest Korean populations in the United States – to explore what distinguishes each. Both are 24-hour hubs of food and drinking culture on May 7. However, New York City’s Koreatown covers just one block, whereas Los Angeles’ Koreatown seems like a city unto itself.

On Lucky Chow Northern Thai Cuisine on May 14, see how Andy Ricker, a carpenter-turned-chef from Portland, Oreg., brings “authentic” Thai food to America. At a food festival in Las Vegas, Ricker prepares a welcome dinner for the participating chefs at the much-loved Lotus of Siam, with chef/owner Saipin Chutima at the helm. At the table, Jet Tila rhapsodizes about the days when his family opened America’s first Thai grocery store in Hollywood.

Filipinos comprise the second-largest Asian-American population nationwide, yet their cuisine is relatively unknown. On Lucky Chow Filipino Entrepreneurs, PJ Quesada, founder of the Filipino Food Movement, explains Filipino cuisine on May 21. Meet restaurateur Nicole Ponseca, who left her life as a advertising executive in New York to give voice to her culture through food. And finally, the two friends behind Bling Bling Dumplings manufacture thousands of dumplings – from scratch, at home – to serve at Coachella and other festivals.

Lucky Chow Bay Area’s Pacific Rim Cuisine introduces Olivia Wu, designer of the original Asian restaurant concepts on Google’s “campus” on May 28. After a career in Silicon Valley, two retired Japanese executives returned to their ancestral farming roots and constructed an indoor vertical farm which services some of the top restaurants in the Bay Area. The episode ends at a now-mainstream tofu factory.

Lucky Chow Chinatown, Reimagined tracks the evolution of Chinese food in America through the lens of two third-generation Chinese-American restaurateurs on June 4.

Additionally, Q will air the following episodes of Pacific Heartbeat Season 5  Saturdays at 6 p.m.:

In New Zealand, the government is about to sell off a third of its publicly owned state houses. With a growing housing crisis and a lack of affordable homes, what will the future of housing look like and where will the thousands of state house tenants end up living? Pacific Heartbeat A Place To Call Home attempts to shed light on this timely issue on May 7.

Pilipo Solatorio lives on the island of Molokai. He is the last to hold the cultural traditions, music, and stories of a sacred Hawaiian valley that has been home to his family for hundreds of years. Pacific Heartbeat Sons Of Halawa is an intimate portrait of his search for a successor to keep the cultural traditions alive. Don’t miss it on May 14.

If you had never heard of an airplane or a refrigerator, would you think it was a miracle when one arrived? When the American military landed on a remote island in the South Pacific during World War II, the islanders were amazed by America’s fantastic cargo. The John Frum Movement was born: a unique religion now considered the last surviving “Cargo Cult”.  On May 21, Pacific Heartbeat Waiting For John explores the history and last vestiges of this extraordinary religion, and in the process asks, where do our prophets come from? And what makes people believe?

On May 28, Pacific Heartbeat Dream Big: Nankuli At The Fringe follows the students of Nanakuli High and Intermediate School Performing Arts Center (NPAC) who were given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to travel halfway across the globe to perform at the Fringe Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Surfing is not only a pillar of village life, but it’s also a means to prestige in Papua New Guinea. On June 4, Pacific Heartbeat Splinters tell the story the months leading up to the first National Surf Championships and explores the hopes and dreams of the surfers, and how surfing has led to societal changes in a male dominated culture.

Want to experience this rich culture with us online? Celebrate with student films! Watch these @FilmSchoolShorts mini-movies on YOUR time. Our Film School Shorts Asian Pacific American Heritage Month YouTube playlist featuring student films is live!

 

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