Highlights July 17-23

KLRU Highlights

On this week’s episode of Dancing On The Edge, learn why Louis doubts Julian’s story about his trip to Paris the night Jessie was attacked. When racist Germans walk out during the band’s performance at the hotel, Stanley devises a plan to get revenge. Lady Cremone relays news about Jessie. Watch on Sunday at 7 pm.

Kevin Whately and Laurence Fox return for a seventh season of the Inspector Lewis series. The crime is a complicated one that bridges the worlds of neurosurgery, blood sports and animal rights. Lewis, struggling to adapt to retired life, jumps at the chance to rejoin the force when Superintendent Innocent seeks his help. With Lewis back on the team, will they be able to solve the mystery? Tune in at 8 pm.

Next at 9:30 pm on Tunnel, the “Truth Terrorist”‘s third “truth” begins as Benji carries out his Samurai mission. Sophie’s life is now at stake and police believe they can use her to stop the terrorist’s rampage. Karl gets more than he bargained for while visiting Charlotte.

Following at 10:30 pm, Father Brown discovers the truth of a crime by looking into the truth of the soul – the passions, dark secrets, hidden desires. Many years spent hearing his parishioners’ confessions have given him an uncanny insight into the origins of evil and the workings of the criminal mind. But the stories are not concerned with judgement – Father Brown is more interested in saving souls than in bringing the guilty to justice.

Tune in for gavel-to-gavel primetime coverage of the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff co-anchor for PBS NewsHour in partnership with NPR. Coverage will also be available via live streaming. Watch Monday-Thursday at 7 pm.

For more than 40 years, Washington Week has delivered the most interesting conversation of the week featuring a group of journalists participating in roundtable discussion of major news events. Watch on Friday on Washington Week with Gwen Ifill at 7 pm.

Next at 8 pm on Great British Baking Show, see how the remaining contestants bake without sugar, gluten or dairy. In the Signature challenge, they create a variety of sugar-free cakes. Gluten-free pitas are in store for the Technical, and the Showstopper features dairy-free ice cream rolls.

Stay tuned for another episode of Great British Baking Show at 9 pm. Enter the competition tent to see the bakers prove their pastry skills, first with frangipane tarts in the Signature. The Technical throws them into uncharted territory with a mystery pastry: flaouna. The Showstopper demands bite-sized vol-au-vents.

At 10 pm on Austin City Limits, Austin’s best alternative rock shines with Spoon and White Denim. Top 10-seller Spoon highlights its album They Want My Soul, while White Denim features its LP Corsicana Lemonade.

Conserve water in wicking beds and see which tomatoes win the tastiest test. Watch on Saturday on Central Texas Gardener at noon.

Later at 7 pm, Austin City Limits presents modern roots rock with Jason Isbell and Neko Case. Isbell performs tunes from his acclaimed LP Southeastern, while Case sings songs from her latest album.

At 8 pm, Father Brown discovers the truth of a crime by looking into the truth of the soul – the passions, dark secrets, hidden desires. Many years spent hearing his parishioners’ confessions have given him an uncanny insight into the origins of evil and the workings of the criminal mind. But the stories are not concerned with judgement – Father Brown is more interested in saving souls than in bringing the guilty to justice.

Kevin Whately and Laurence Fox return for a seventh season of the Inspector Lewis series at 9 pm. The crime is a complicated one that bridges the worlds of neurosurgery, blood sports and animal rights. Lewis, struggling to adapt to retired life, jumps at the chance to rejoin the force when Superintendent Innocent seeks his help. With Lewis back on the team, will they be able to solve the mystery?

Foyle’s War, Series VII.” Michael Kitchen and Honeysuckle Weeks return in three episodes of this detective series. Set in post-war 1946-47, Foyle (Kitchen) and his loyal friend Sam (Weeks) find themselves adjusting to a new era of secrets, intelligence and security as their worlds shift into those of MI5. Tune in at 10: 30 pm.

 

PBS NewsHour: Ducklings can think abstractly

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Are you my mother? A new study from the University of Oxford shows that ducklings have the ability to decipher abstract relationships between shapes and colors without training unlike other animals thought to be intelligent, such as parrots or monkeys. The study began as a way to investigate imprinting, which is when offspring become attached to the first thing they see.

According to PBS NewsHour, the findings “suggest baby ducks use abstract thought to keep tabs of their moms in tough situations and that the ability might be crucial for a wide array of vertebrate animals.”

Ducklings were tested with a same/different exam.

From PBS NewsHour:

The team used several different conditions, so here is a basic example: An hour after birth, the team put individual ducklings in an arena with a single pair of moving objects of the same shape, for instance, two red pyramids. The objects swung around, like a mobile in a baby’s crib, and imprinted on the ducks. The chicks ultimately followed the pyramids around the arena.

Later, the birds were placed in the same arena, but this time with two fresh pairs of red objects: a pair of spheres or a cone linked to a cylinder. The team watched as the ducklings decided between following the objects that were the same as each other (a pair of cubes) akin to their imprinting stage or the objects that were different (cone-cylinder). Get it: same/difference exam.

The team found that three-quarters of the ducklings preferred to follow the objects with the same relationship shown during the imprinting stage. This trend held true in the reverse scenario. If ducklings were exposed to two differently shaped objects early on, say cube-sphere, then they would pick contrasting over identical objects in later trials. Plus, the ducklings showed the same pattern when the team tested colors rather than shapes. (The team tested 47 ducklings in the trials with shape discrimination, and 66 in the tests involving color discrimination.)

These findings might be able to disprove the claim that abstract thinking is unique to humans. You can find the full article here.

KLRU-Q welcomes new show ‘Dragons Alive’ 7/15

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Following Wildest Islands, stay tuned for a brand new KLRU-Q show, Dragons Alive. This three-part series investigates how today’s reptiles are adapting to live alongside man.

Ruling Reptilesairs July 15 at 8:55 pm
This first episode looks at the various groups of reptiles that inherited the earth from the dinosaurs

Smart Reptilesairs July 22 at 8:55 pm
This second episode looks at the incredible diversity of skills that reptiles possess.

Dragons Aliveairs July 29 at 8:55 pm
This last episode looks at the future of reptiles in the modern world.

KLRU-Q Friday 7/15: New show ‘Wildest Islands’

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KLRU-Q welcomes a new show, ‘Wildest Islands,’ which is set to premiere on July 15.

This archipelago of over 7,000 islands and reefs lies within the crystal clear waters of the Caribbean Sea. From just a few metres wide, to hundreds of kilometres across, every island is different, and each has its own unique wildlife.

The Caribbean: The Wild Side Of Paradise – airs July 15 at 8 pm

Galapagos: Darwin’s Edenairs July 22 at 8 pm 

The Hebrides: Land Of Legendsairs July 29 at 8 pm

Sri Lanka: Monsoon Islandairs August 5 at 8:05 pm 

Amazon River Islands: The Floating Forestairs August 12 at 8:05 pm

Falkland Islands: Penguin Paradiseairs August 19 at 8:05 pm

Japan Islands Of Extremesairs August 26 at 8:05 pm

Philippines: Islands Of Mysteryairs September 2 at 8:05 pm 

Vancouver Islands: Rivers Of Lifeairs September 9 at 8:05 pm

 

In the Studio: Jane Harman tapes Overheard 7/25

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Please join KLRU’s Overheard with Evan Smith for an interview with Jane Harman. 

Date: Monday, July 25

Time: 12:45 pm (Doors open at 12:15 pm)

Location: KLRU’s Studio 6A (map)

RSVP: The event is free but an RSVP is required. RSVP Now. (Entrance is based on capacity)

unnamedJane Harman is a former US Representative for California’s 36th district. After resigning from Congress in 2011, Harman joined the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars as its first female President and CEO. During her nine terms in Congress she served on the Armed Services, Intelligence and Homeland Security committees. Harman is the recipient of numerous awards for distinguished service, including the CIA Agency Seal Medal and the CIA Director’s Award.

PBS Kids at the Alamo: Odd Squad: The Movie 7/16, 17 & 19

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‘Odd Squad’ is back and ready to save the world in a new feature-length film as part of PBS Kids at the Alamo series.

A rival team of adults called the Weird Team arrives with a gadget that fixes any odd problem. As a result, Odd Squad is forced to disband and return to their lives as regular kids. However, the kids discover the gadget doesn’t solve problems, just covers them up.

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Watch as the season two cast joins the season one cast to stop the Weird Team and save the world from destruction.

Jack McBrayer (30 Rock) and Hannah Simone (New Girl) guest star as leaders of the Weird Team.

All ages will be allowed entrance at showings. Reserve your seat with a $1-3 donation, each donation will benefit education programs for your local PBS station. The theater will have a Baby Day rule – noisy young fans will not be asked to leave the theatre but Alamo encourages cellphones and other devices to stay dark.

Showings:

Saturday, July 16 at Slaughter Lane – 1:25 pm

Sunday, July 17 at Lakeline – 12:35 pm

Tuesday, July 19 at Lakeline – 3:15 pm

Save the Date: POV Screening What Tomorrow Brings 8/2

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Join us on August 2 as we close our POV Documentary Screenings with What Tomorrow Brings.

This film go deep into the very first WhatTomorrowBringsWeb-300x225girls’ school in a small Afghan village. Never before have fathers allowed their daughters to gain an education; now Taliban threats heighten their misgivings. From the school’s beginning is 2009 to its first graduating class in 2015, this film will take you through the stories of students, teachers, parents, village elders and the school’s founder Razia Jan. While the girlslearn to read and write, their education goes far beyond the classroom as they discover the differences between the lives they were born into and the lives they dream of leading.

This event is FREE and open to the public.

RSVP here.

PBS Newshour: Science Wednesday explores study on what makes music pleasant

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Music is subjective to those who are listening to it, according to a new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

In today’s Science Wednesday, PBS Newshour looked at the study that could settle the dispute of whether music is pleasurable because of biology or culture.

Published in Nature, the study focused on the responses from members of the Tsimane tribe from Bolivia that had little to no exposure to Western music and compared them to that of Bolivian and American populations that did have that exposure. The results showed that those of the Tsimane tribe found both consonant and dissonant tones pleasurable, while Bolivian and American populations preferred consonant.

The study was authored by Josh McDermott, an MIT cognitive neuroscientist.

From PBS Newshour:

“Consonance seems like such a simple phenomenon, and in Western music there’s strong supposition that it’s biological,” McDermott said. “But this study suggests culture is more important than many people acknowledge.”

Delving deeper, McDermott took the Tsimane tribe’s own music, which evolved outside of Western influence, and tweaked it to include dissonant and consonant tones. Again, the tribe showed no preference.

“The Tsimane do prefer pleasant vocalizations, such as laughter, to unpleasant gasps,” Robert Zatorre, a neurologist who has also studied the Tsimane tribe, wrote in an accompanying op-ed. “They understood what was being asked of them.”

According to Newshour, this is the first study that has actively applied the theory that consonance is culturally socialized to a group ignorant to Western music theory.

It’s bread week on The Great British Baking Show 7/15

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After a long day at work to put bread on the table, tune in to KLRU to watch the next episode of The Great British Baking Show where the ten remaining contestants will face the challenge of bread baking.

During bread week, bakers will have three different tasks including creating two quick free-form breads, four French baguettes, and a 3-D bread sculpture. Are they up for the challenge?

This week on The Great British Baking ShowIt’s Bread Week on The Great British Baking Show, and Paul is testing the bakers on the classic French baguette. Catch a new episode this Friday night. http://to.pbs.org/29VbJOJ #PBSBakingShow

Posted by PBS on Wednesday, July 13, 2016

 

This episode premieres July 15 at 9:00 p.m. on KLRU.

Our Frontline picks

Frontline

It’s hard to watch the news nowadays and not hear the word ‘ISIS’ fall out of the mouth of the commentator. With each new terrorist attack ISIS seems to be at the top of the suspect list.

But how much do we know about the terrorist group? Why is it taking so long to defeat them? These Frontline documentaries go in-depth to show you what and who ISIS is and how they operate.

PBS’ premier public affairs series, Frontline’s stature is reaffirmed each week through incisive documentaries covering the scope and complexity of the human, social and political experience.

Frontline has built a reputation for powerful reporting that tackles the tough, controversial, and complex stories that shape our times. The show remains committed to providing a primetime venue for engaging reports that fully explore and illuminate the critical issues of our times.

Who Was the Founder of ISIS? 

A video-store clerk turned radical jihadist, Abu Musab al-Zarqaqi,  was the mastermind behind the sectarian warfare that tore Iraq apart after the U.S. invasion, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths.

 

 

How U.S. Prisons in Iraq Became “Jihadi Universities” for ISIS

 

The Secret History of ISIS 

This documentary examines the role that America’s invasion of Iraq have played in the terror group’s brutal rise.

ISIS in Afghanistan

ISIS is making a name for themselves in Afghanistan and their focus is on creating new generation of jihadists.

A Conversation With Teens in Training as ISIS Suicide Bombers 

Watch this firsthand look exploring the state of a nation and how terrorist group is expanding its rule over the Islamic State.