PBS Online Film Festival features Two Austin Films

Today, PBS announced the 25 short films that will be part of the third annual PBS Online Film Festival beginning June 16 – July 31. Austin filmmakers Joshua Riehl and Nidhi Reddy are among those featured in this year’s Festival for their films Digging for Water and The Yellow Wallpaper.

The films will be available for streaming across all PBS digital platforms, including PBS.org, Roku, Xbox, YouTube and PBS social media channels. Viewers are encouraged to vote for their favorite film to win the “People’s Choice” award. For updates on the festival, follow #PBSolff on Twitter.

Digging for Water
Vote here for this film
Joshua Riehl is filmmaker based in Austin, Texas, with a strong background in investigative journalism. Originally from just near Detroit, Michigan, he moved to Austin in 2009 to attend the University of Texas at Austin. He was a producer for PBS Frontline’s 2010 season premiere “Death by Fire” about the questionable execution of Cameron Todd Willingham. With an interest in criminal justice stories, he was Associate Producer for the 2013 SXSW Film Festival’s Audience Award winning documentary “An Unreal Dream” about the highly publicized case of Michael Morton’s wrongful conviction.

Digging for Water came out of three separate trips to Haiti over the course of 18 months and a longtime desire to visit the underdeveloped nation. Falling in love with the country and the people, Riehl intends to continue working in Haiti and  hopes to tell the story of dictator “Papa Doc” Duvalier’s tortuous rule in the future.

The Yellow Wallpaper
Vote here for this film
Nidhi Reddy is a recent graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, majoring in both Mathematics and Radio-TV-Film.  Her short animation, The Yellow Wallpaper, was an official selection of the 2013 London Feminist Film Festival, 2013 Portobello Film Festival in London, 2014 Austin Film Society ShortCase, the 2013 Longhorn Showcase, and has won grand prizes in two student film festivals.

The PBS Online Film Festival showcases powerful stories from filmmakers across the country while providing an opportunity to reach an engaged and digitally savvy audience. Attracting more than 1 million video streams and over 50,000 votes in its first two years, the PBS Online Film Festival has become a popular annual online event.

The PBS Online Film Festival showcases diverse films from Independent Lens, POV and collaborations with public television producers including, Center for Asian American Media, Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB), National Black Programming Consortium (NPBC) and Pacific Islanders in Communications (PIC), Wisconsin Media Lab and Vision Maker Media. This year, several locally-produced short films will be featured from PBS member stations including KQED (San Francisco), KLRU (Austin, TX), Alaska Public Media, Vermont PBS, Arkansas Educational Television (AETN), CET/ThinkTV(Cincinnati/Dayton), WCVE (Richmond, Virginia) and Louisiana Public Broadcasting.

“PBS and member stations are committed to experimenting with new platforms to reach diverse audiences with high-quality and engaging content,” said Ira Rubenstein, Senior Vice President and General Manager, PBS Digital. “PBS is the home for independent film, both online and on-air, and we’re proud that the Online Film Festival has become an annual celebration of unique films representing a diverse array of voices and viewpoints.”

 

Ann Richards School Student Productions 2014

The Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders was founded in 2007 and serves grades 6-12. It is a unique public all-girls school in Austin, Texas dedicated to educating young women to become leaders and to provide them with the skills needed to be successful in college and beyond. Ann Richards is a college preparatory school that focuses on challenging its students through rigorous pre-AP and AP courses.

When students at Ann Richards reach ninth grade, they choose one of three pathways to learn about in their four years of high school: Media Technology, Engineering, or Biomedical. Students in the Media Technology pathway create many short films and animations, among other things, over the course of their high school years. KLRU has partnered with juniors from the Media Technology pathway to share a selection of these shorts.

The animations were completed by the sophomores over the course of a semester and the short films were completed by the juniors and seniors. Before beginning these projects, students had to develop new skills and learn software programs such as Adobe After Effects, Adobe Photoshop, Papagayo, Final Cut Pro, and AVID. The students had to write, develop, and produce their pieces on their own. The sophomores worked on hand drawing and painting their characters in photoshop before working on After Effects to animate their stories. The juniors and seniors worked on their own to write, edit, and produce their films. These girls dedicated time before and after school as well as on the weekends to complete their animations and films.

These short films and animations are available now

Arts In Context Shorts: More Awkward Than Heavy

ASFILMT2This week, Arts In Context Shorts presents the fun side of art. In the sequel of “More Awkward Than Heavy,” Ink Tank Lab‘s artists focus on collaborating, having fun and letting their imaginations go wild. “MATH2″ is an installation that explores going to art shows as a social event and pokes fun at museum and gallery stereotypes. Ink Tank’s artists want the attendees to participate, touch and help create the “awkward” experience. While some work in academic or museum settings and all have different aesthetics, working together as Ink Tank Lab allows these artists to lose the restraints put on when creating ‘serious’ artwork.

Austin Revealed: Neil Blumofe

In Central Texas as elsewhere, being Jewish means many different things. KLRU will explore the many differing ways of identifying and “being” Jewish in Austin in a series of short format documentaries for our web series Austin Revealed.

Today’s video features Rabbi Neil Blumofe
Rabbi Neil Blumofe inspires more than his growing Congregation Agudas Achim. As a classically-trained pianist and schooled in jazz saxophone, Rabbi Blumofe’s talents are more than meets the eye, and being in the “Live Music Capital of the World,” he engages with more than the Jewish community in KUT’s live music series Views and Brews.

Austin Revealed is an oral history project that shares personal experiences and stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.. Learn more about Austin Revealed.

Austin Revealed: Sandra Thornhill

In Central Texas as elsewhere, being Jewish means many different things. KLRU will explore the many differing ways of identifying and “being” Jewish in Austin in a series of short format documentaries for our web series Austin Revealed.

Today’s video features Sandra Thornhill.
A hairstylist. A history nerd. A Jew. Sandra now identifies as all of the above. Having converted to Judaism over 10 years ago, Sandra’s relationship with being Jewish continues to evolve.

Austin Revealed is an oral history project that shares personal experiences and stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.. Learn more about Austin Revealed.

Austin Revealed: Aviad Fuchs

In Central Texas as elsewhere, being Jewish means many different things. KLRU will explore the many differing ways of identifying and “being” Jewish in Austin in a series of short format documentaries for our web series Austin Revealed.

Today’s video features Aviad Fuchs
Aviad moved from Israel to Austin last summer, and diversity is the thing he noticed most about the Jewish community in Central Texas.  With welcoming synagogues and modern approaches, the variety of Jewish culture in Austin is intriguing for this tech engineer that identifies as a secular Jew.

Austin Revealed is an oral history project that shares personal experiences and stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.. Learn more about Austin Revealed.

Austin Revealed: Joanie Shapiro

In Central Texas as elsewhere, being Jewish means many different things. KLRU will explore the many differing ways of identifying and “being” Jewish in Austin in a series of short format documentaries for our web series Austin Revealed.

Today’s video features Joanie Shapiro
After selling her medical billing business and moving to Sun City in Georgetown, Texas, Joanie and other Jews living in her area came together to form Haverah Shalom. This congregation started by in the late 1990s by meeting for Shabbat services at each other’s homes. Now, Haverah Shalom has grown exponentially in size and resources, including a portable Ark and Torah. These congregation members have come to form bonds religiously, socially, and philanthropically to create a Jewish
community.

Austin Revealed is an oral history project that shares personal experiences and stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.. Learn more about Austin Revealed.

Austin Revealed: Jennifer Greenberg Seth

In Central Texas as elsewhere, being Jewish means many different things. KLRU will explore the many differing ways of identifying and “being” Jewish in Austin in a series of short format documentaries for our web series Austin Revealed.

Today’s video features Jennifer Greenberg Seth
Growing up the granddaughter of a famous Jewish athlete, Jennifer has always identified as being Jewish. Now, she has finally found her own place in the Jewish community – singing with the Temple Beth Shalom choir. Whether at choir practice or High Holiday services, Jennifer’s bond to the Jewish community in Austin continues to strengthen through their melodic arrangements.

Austin Revealed is an oral history project that shares personal experiences and stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.. Learn more about Austin Revealed.

KLRU films chosen for City’s Faces of Austin project

The City of Austin has chosen two KLRU short films— Arts In Context Shorts Pour Your Heart Out and Austin Revealed Civil Rights Stories — to be featured in the annual Faces of Austin short film project.

The City of Austin will premiere its Faces of Austin short film selections for 2014 as part of the SXSW Film Community Screenings on Saturday, March 8 at 11:00 a.m. at the Marchesa Hall and Theatre, 6226 Middle Fiskville Rd. The 2014 Faces of Austin premiere is free, open to the public, and does not require a SXSW film badge or pass.

The 12 films chosen this year were all made by local filmmakers and highlight the people, institutions, and cultures that make up Austin. Several films feature local non-profit organizations, such as Goodwill of Central Texas and the Austin Bike Zoo. Other films focus on unique individuals within the community, including a Hurricane Katrina survivor who now calls Austin home and pioneers of the local civil rights movement.

The entire list of 2014 films can be viewed at www.austintexas.gov/facesofaustin.

Faces of Austin is intended to showcase the work of Austin filmmakers that reflects the diverse faces, voices, and experiences that make up Austin’s unique identity. Individual films from the 2014 collection will be viewable on ATXN, online, and at special screenings.

Faces of Austin is a program of the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin’s Economic Development Department and ATXN, the City’s government access channel. The program debuted in 2005; this year marks the seventh year of showcasing Austin-made short films. The 2014 program was supported by SXSW Film and the Austin Film Society.

City of Austin Cultural Arts Division
The Cultural Arts Division of the Economic Development Department provides leadership and management for the City’s cultural arts programs and for the development of arts and cultural industries. The Cultural Arts Division is responsible for the Cultural Arts Funding Programs, Art in Public Places Program, community-based arts development, and programs to assist the development of film and creative industries in Austin. For more information, visit www.austincreates.com.

Austin Revealed: Joan Khabele on Segregation at Barton Springs

In honor of Black History Month, Austin Revealed features stories of Austin’s civil rights history told through first person interviews.

Denied a class trip to Barton Springs, Joan Khabele protested the exclusion of African Americans. She describes the measures she and others took to desegregate the iconic Austin landmark.

KLRU’s Austin Revealed is an online oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future. Watch more Austin Revealed