Arts In Context Shorts: Stitched Together

While traveling across Europe, Mychal Mitchell thought she would be inspired by the architecture of the cities she visited but after having her journal stolen in a train station she soon discovered a bookbinding studio in Venice and fell in love with the old-world-style of handmade leather journals.

Handtorn paper“I discovered bookbinding kind of my accident,” Mitchell said. “About a week later, I was kind of flirting with this very handsome street artist and he ended up taking me to his friend’s little bookbinding studio and I ended up being blown away by what he was doing.”
Now, more than 20 years later, Mitchell continues to use the techniques she learned on her European trip and shares her beautiful handcrafted journals and photo albums with others in her East Austin Studio.

Cutting leather“It’s really inspiring to see the way that people use them,” she said. “Especially when people bring them back to me and they are all filled up…they’re gorgeous.”

 

 

KLRU Passport: New On-Demand Streaming

Passport-Blog

KLRU is pleased to introduce KLRU Passport, a new member benefit offering extended on-demand access to a rich library of public television programming. KLRU Passport provides donors access to current and archival programs from both PBS and KLRU and is available via the KLRU website, PBS.org and other digital platforms.

There are over a thousand hours of content available to donors through KLRU Passport and the library will continue to grow over time. Current titles include Downton Abbey, Wolf Hall and other dramas from MASTERPIECE, as well as favorites such as Vicious, Makers, Earth a New Wild, How We Got to Now, The Great British Baking Show, Austin City Limits Season 41 and many more.

In addition to the KLRU website, KLRU Passport is also available to members when they identify KLRU as their local PBS member station on PBS.org and the PBS Video apps for iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, as well as the PBS app on AppleTV. KLRU Passport will be available on more platforms in the future.

KLRU Passport is our newest member benefit available for donors with a yearly contribution of at least $60 or an ongoing monthly contribution of $5 or more. Station members must activate their account before they can access KLRU Passport.

Here’s some FAQs to help YOU get started with KLRU Passport:

I am a member of KLRU and currently donate $60 or more a year. How do I access KLRU Passport?

Current members who donate $60 or more annually and have an active email address on file with the station will receive an email from PBS and KLRU inviting you to begin the activation process. There’s a chance the email may get filtered into your spam box so be sure to look for a message from PBS & KLRU with the subject line: Your KLRU membership now includes more on-demand programming. If you’re a current member and you don’t have an active email address on file with us, please contact Member Services at membership@klru.org or (512) 475-9032 to provide an email address and begin the activation process.

I think I am a current member of KLRU that qualifies for KLRU Passport, but I’m not sure. And I’m not sure you have my email address on file. How do I find out?

To see if your KLRU Passport membership has been activated, visit this site and enter your email address to see: http://www.pbs.org/passport/lookup/ Follow the instructions on the screen.

I am not a current member of KLRU. Can I donate to receive immediate access to KLRU Passport?

Yes. You can make your monthly ongoing or annual contribution on this donation form to immediately begin the activation process for KLRU Passport. You may also access this donation form through any video that has the KLRU Passport logo. Click “Sign up for KLRU Passport” and donate to begin the activation process.

Click here to see the complete KLRU Passport FAQ.

Outside the Box: Teens challenge gender stereotypes

Outside the Box, a collection of stories that profile teens challenging gender stereotypes, is available to watch online now! The stories were made by the NewsHour Student Reporting Lab. This series introduces viewers to Shantell, the 16-year-old commanding officer of her high school’s JROTC program. We discover Zack’s passion for designing clothes, which ultimately lands the teen a spot on “Project Runway Junior.” And we get to know youth like Semra and D.J., who by exploring their identities challenge those around them to think #outsidethebox. Watch all the Outside the Box videos now.

Two videos were produced by area schools as part of KLRU’s work with the NewsHour Student Reporting Lab.

Fix all of it from Student Reporting Labs on Vimeo.

Produced by Luisa Garcia and Karen Lopez, students at Manor High School in Manor, Texas.

What’s it like to be a female mechanic? Sofia Rodriguez is an 18-year-old Texas native who currently works at both Jiffy Lube and Dynamic Motor Repair. Working in a male-dominated field can be challenging, however, Sofia says, “bring it on.”

Gamemaker from Student Reporting Labs on Vimeo.

Produced by Patrick Cadet, Isaiah Cavanaugh, Andrew Duncan, Alyssa San Miguel, Ashley Tamez, students at Pflugerville High School in Pflugerville, Texas.

Despite what many people assume because of her gender, Jazsmin Burton enjoys coding and wants to study game design in college so she can develop games herself.

Arts In Context Shorts: Sweet Art

AICS SWEET ART ANNIE DECORATINGEach time Annie Varghese starts a new cake, she feels like it’s her first one, and she won’t stop until she reaches perfection. She found her passion for cake sculpting from baking cakes for her children’s birthdays, and now she uses traditional flavors and ingredients to transform her cakes into a limitless, fictional world. She believes that every cake is a chance to explore her imagination, and she uses clean lines and balanced color tones to add details and create larger, more extravagant cakes. Her passion shows that cake isn’t just a sweet treat but an exciting art medium.

 

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – The Wong Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Wong Family
Growing up as part of one of the first families of Chinese descent in Austin, Dr. Mitchel Wong “wasn’t looking for prejudice, wasn’t looking for any animosity, and didn’t see any animosity.” In this documentary, Wong recounts his family’s immigrant history as a member of the “Pershing Chinese” and his personal journey from grocery boy to ophthalmologist.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Sing family and the Lung family.

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – Lung Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Lung Family
As an employee at the Texas Capitol Gift Shop, Joe Michael Lung meets visitors from around the globe. But for him, none of those places compare to Texas. In this documentary, Joe and his sister Meiling Lung tell stories of their grandfather, Joe Lung, and their father, Sam P. Lung—beloved restauranteurs in the community and members of one of the first families of Chinese descent in Austin.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Sing family and the Wong family.

Austin Revealed: Pioneers From the East – The Sing Family

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin Revealed, Pioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area. Learn about their cultures, their histories and how living in Austin has shaped their families in these short documentaries.

The Sing Family
Mary Frances Aguallo and her grandson Raul Aguallo Hernandez always knew they were of Chinese descent, but the fragments of their history finally began to come together with the discovery of a lost box in an attic. In this documentary, the two explore their dual identity as Mexican American and Chinese American as part of the Sing family, one of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in Austin.

Check out the stories of two other local families of Chinese origin, the Wong family and the Lung family.

Austin Revealed: Austin’s Asian American Resource Center

Austin Revealed is an oral history project sharing the stories of Austin’s past and present to encourage discussion and thought around the city’s future.

In this series of Austin RevealedPioneers From the East, we profile three of the first families of Chinese origin to settle in the Austin area – the Sing family, the Wong family and the Lung family.

In addition, Austin Revealed takes you inside Austin’s Asian American Resource Center, a community center focusing on celebrating Austin’s unique Asian community.

The AARC
Austin’s Asian American Resource Center, or AARC, truly embraces Austin’s unique community of Asian people from all over the world. Acting as a bridge between the Asian American community and Austin, the center is one of the most utilized in the city. The AARC provides programs for senior citizens, activities for families, cultural and art exhibits and much more.