News Briefs: Educating Students about Native American Culture

November is Native American Heritage Month, and to celebrate Great Promise for American Indians held its 24th annual Powwow and American Indian Heritage Festival on November 7th. While the Powwow has wrapped up, the goal of it’s organizers is ongoing. Great Promise is working to educate youth both in and out of their culture on Native American heritage and traditions.

Self-Defense Class Fights for SAFE Austin

This is the fifth year that the Moy Yat Kung Fu Academy has offered self defense classes for women, but this year they’re doing something a little different.  The entry fee for the class is a donation to SAFE Austin, an organization dedicated to ending cycles of abuse and violence.

KLRU News Briefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend, Saturday and Sunday evenings at 6pm. 


In the Studio: Presidential Candidate Martin O’Malley


RSVP to be in our studio audience when KLRU’s Overheard with Evan Smith interviews Democratic Presidential Candidate Martin O’Malley. RSVP now

Thursday, November 12 at 10:15am in KLRU’s Studio 6A (map). Doors open at 9:45am.

O'MalleyMartin O’Malley is a Democratic candidate for president running against Secretary Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders. Former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley is a lifelong Democrat and the frontman of an Irish rockband. He served as Mayor of Baltimore for 7 years. As Governor, O’Malley tackled many of the hottest issues in the Democratic party. He signed one of the nation’s toughest gun bills, legislation repealing Maryland’s death penalty, a bill expanding pre-K, one that decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana, and one that increased the state’s minimum wage.

This taping is a co-production with The Texas Tribune.

Be there as Overheard with Evan Smith continues a 6th season of interviews featuring engaging conversations with fascinating people. And don’t forget you can watch past episodes anytime at!

The event is free but an RSVP is required. Admission is based upon capacity.

After Trauma of Combat, Soldiers Heal Through Songwriting

Austin-based singer-songwriter Darden Smith had never had a real conversation with a U.S. military service member until he met Lt. Col. Fred Cale. He quickly realized that they had much in common – both were music lovers. Through this meeting, Smith, the founder of SongwritingWith:Soldiers, realized that the divide between soldier and civilian was not what he thought it was. He saw the potential for music and songwriting to help soldiers transition back into civilian life.

“SongwritingWith:Soldiers to me is an incredibly beautiful kind of evolution, you might say, of what I’ve always wanted to do, which is tell stories and write songs,” Smith said.

The free program pairs professional songwriters with veterans to craft original songs based on their experiences. For many of the 120 military members who have participated, songwriting begins the healing process.

“I guarantee you they’ve saved lives with this program,” said Major Chuck Hawthorne, a retired Marine.

Equal parts cathartic release and creative endeavor, SongwritingWith:Soldiers offers a chance at healing to the people who need it most.

PBS Newshour Weekend: Taking Care of Trees

In addition to taking care of wounded soldiers, the San Antonio Military Medical Center tends to a healing garden – a garden which actually helps heal the soldiers. This program from Central Texas Gardener includes a story that features the Warrior and Family Support System gardens at Fort Sam Houston.

“The purpose of it is to encourage warriors and their families, help them integrate back into society to a – I overuse the expression – but a whole new normal, because their lives are changed forever,” Judith Markelz, director of the Warrior and Family Support Center said.

Emotional, powerful, encouraging stories about a beautiful garden designed for healing warriors, including burn patients and patients with prosthetics. Typically, the warriors stay at the medical center for a long time.

Volunteers dedicate time to pruning roses, and local nurseries and gardeners add plants and materials to the healing garden.

“Everybody I invite to come here and take a tour, they are just blown away with what has been done for our wounded warriors, so they’re just willing to help out,” one volunteer said.

7 Constitutional Amendments on the Ballot

Thanks to our partners at The Texas Tribune for this brief on the upcoming election.

From highway funding to protecting hunting and fishing, Texas voters will have a say in whether the state Constitution should be amended in seven very different ways. Alana Rocha, with our reporting partner The Texas Tribune, breaks down what you’ll see on the ballot. Early voting ends Friday. Election day is Tuesday, November 3rd.

Free College Course Lowers Barriers to Education for Adults

Free Minds, a program of Foundation Communities, is a free, 6 credit college humanities course, for mostly low-income adults. The program is unique because most adults who return to school take skill-based courses, rather than humanities courses. To lower common barriers to education, Free Minds also provides a warm dinner before every evening class, and free childcare.

Ideas and Politics Exchanged at Texas Tribune Festival


The fifth annual Texas Tribune Festival took place on the University of Texas campus last weekend, bringing with it hundreds of lawmakers, policy experts, and civically-minded Texans for in-depth conversations and panels about issues facing our state. KLRU’s Public Affairs team attended the Fest, and while we wish we could have cloned ourselves and seen even more, there are a few panels we keep thinking about almost a week later.

How to Turn a School Around

After spending January-August reporting on Eastside Memorial High School’s struggles to make state accountability, we knew we couldn’t miss this panel. Austin ISD Superintendent Dr. Paul Cruz spoke, along with Donna Bahorich, Chairwoman of the SBOE, David Anthony of Raise Your Hand Texas, Superintendent Juan Cabrera of El Paso ISD, and Steven Tallant of Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

When asked how AISD turned Eastside around after more than a decade of failing scores, Dr. Cruz explained the process was complex because of the low-income community the school serves.

“It was a very methodical process,” Dr. Cruz said, explaining that TEA gave Eastside and AISD more time than usual in the reconstitution plan. Cruz stressed the importance of understanding the home lives of at-risk students, and the need for a “community schools approach.”

An audience member who serves on a school board in another Texas district asked Dr. Cruz if AISD would be releasing a white paper about the methods used at Eastside. Dr. Cruz said yes, a report will be compiled so other districts can see what worked.

One-on-One with Nancy Pelosi

Another high point for us during the Texas Tribune Festival was the National Keynote with U.S. House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. Pelosi sat down with Tribune Washington Bureau Chief Abby Livingston in front of a packed audience in Hogg Memorial Auditorium.

Seemingly no topic was off limits – Pelosi discussed the House Speaker race, Hillary Clinton’s run for office, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Iran nuclear deal, immigration reform, gun control, and even Ann Richards.

Pelosi said she is confident Democrats will regain control of the U.S. House by 2018, though she was noncommittal when asked if she would hold the Speaker’s gavel again. “I think the Democrats can have the gavel in 18 months,” she said.

When asked how to ensure more women run for office and are elected, Pelosi blamed campaign finance. Repeatedly during her keynote conversation she stressed the need to limit the amount of money that can be contributed to campaigns and Super PACs. She said if the money could be reigned in, more women and more minorities would run for office and be successful getting elected.

You can see video from Leader Pelosi’s conversation in the video below, courtesy of The Texas Tribune. All of the keynote events were recorded and can be seen here.  

Austin’s Eastern Frontier: A new digital reporting project

water tower

Everyone knows Austin is growing, and we do a lot of reporting at KLRU about that growth – who is being impacted, how is the city prepared to handle new residents, where are the new residents coming from? For the last few months we partnered with KUT 90.5, Austin’s NPR Station, and the Austin Monitor, to report on how Austin’s growth is seeping into a small, nearby city: Manor, Texas.

Today, we unveil a new digital reporting project called Austin’s Eastern Frontier. KLRU, KUT, and the Monitor sent reporters to Manor to find out how their population boom is changing life for the residents there.

The population of the city of Manor has grown more than 500% in the past decade. Like many suburbs in Central Texas, many of the newcomers moved from Austin — pushed out by rising housing costs. Some of them are very low income, some are middle income or former renters who are looking to trade a rent payment for a mortgage.

Mouths to Feed

KLRU’s first story is about The Bannockburn Baptist Church in Manor. They opened a food pantry a few years ago and in the last year and a half, have seen demand spike. Once a week they offer free vegetables, meats, cereal – you name it – free of charge to anyone. Clients get to stroll the aisles and pick out what they like. “All it takes is to have a hungry belly and come in and fill out a couple forms, and you’re good,” Pastor Luis Holguin says.

Longer Arm of the Law

As Manor grows, so does the city’s police force. In the past year Manor PD has added 8 new officers. Most of the calls come from one place: Walmart. But, as the once-small town deals with city problems like traffic and crime, Manorites say it’s not the “rough little town” it once was.

On the Market

Pete Dwyer has been buying up pieces of Manor since the 1990s. He’s watched the land become more valuable and has sold pieces of it to home developers and builders. In recent years he donated some of his land to Manor ISD, which has seen a 92% increase in students in the past decade. The first school built on his land, ShadowGlen Elementary, opened in August 2015. The second elementary school built on his land will open next summer.

We’ll be airing the KLRU stories during PBS NewsHour Weekend on Sunday October 11, Saturday October 17 and Sunday October 18. You can find the entire series by visiting