Arts In Context Shorts: Wilderness Lake

This week, Arts In Context Shorts features a project that combines haunting music with nature.

Set against the stunning backdrop of Laguna Gloria, R. Murray Schafer’s Music for Wilderness Lake is a contemplative experience that combines a natural soundscape with haunting music.  Organized by Director Steve Parker, twelve trombonists position themselves around the lagoon to play the experimental piece at dawn and at dusk, while a conductor sits in a canoe in the middle of the lagoon, signaling the trombonists with flags.  Taking advantage of the unique air patterns and natural sounds during these times of day, Schafer invites the audience to listen to their natural surroundings along with the piece itself.  While both observing and absorbing the landscape around them, listeners of Music for Wilderness Lake find themselves transported to a meditative state of being.

Music for Wilderness Lake was performed at Laguna Gloria at the Contemporary Austin on June 27th and 28th, 2014.

Screening: Black Folk Don’t …

Our friends at Austin Film Society are hosting a Moviemaker Dialogue with Angela Tucker, director and producer of the popular PBS web series Black Folk Don’t… 

The screening takes place on August 25th from 7:30 pm – 9 pm at AFS at the Marchesa Theater, 6226 Middle Fiskville Road. Purchase tickets now

Featured in TIME Magazine’s “10 Ideas That Are Changing Your Life,” Black Folk Don’t has been praised for challenging stereotypes in both poignant and hilarious detail. In this Moviemaker Dialogue, Angela Tucker will discuss using her documentary background to develop the series, which has been featured in The Huffington Post, IndieWire and Ebony Magazine, among others, and is aired on the online channels of PBS and Black Public Media. This discussion will feature some of Angela’s favorite episodes from the series’ three seasons.

Arts In Context Shorts: Combating Latent Inequality Together Fest

Arts In Context Shorts focuses on community collaboration in this week’s story. In it’s tenth year as a grassroots, national festival, Combating Latent Inequality Together (C.L.I.T.) Fest comes to life in Austin for the first time. The DIY, punk and feminist communities come together bringing awareness to sexism, trans-phobia, gender inequalities and other forms of discrimination through workshops, bands and artist collaboration. Benefiting SAFEPLACE, a resource that provides safety for individuals and families affected by sexual and domestic violence, C.L.I.T. Fest reminds others that punk music is a vehicle for activism.

KLRU NewsBriefs: Two very different Austin museums mark milestones

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This weekend during PBS NewsHour we have two different indoor activities you can check out: the Harry Ransom Center’s WWI exhibit and the South Austin Pop Culture Center.

On Saturday we peak inside SouthPop, a non-profit museum dedicated to preserving Austin’s music history and the art surrounding that industry. SouthPop’s director Leea Mechling told us this history is more important for residents to know than ever.

“This place is important to give context of Austin’s culture to people who have lived here for a long time and for people who have just moved here. The era of the ’60s and ’70s and ’80s was really a building time of Austin’s unique culture,” Mechling said.

SouthPop is celebrating 10 years this Summer. It is located on South Lamar and is open Thursday through Sunday 1 – 6pm.

Our Sunday story takes you inside the Harry Ransom Center on the University of Texas campus. To commemorate the centennial of the start of World War I, the museum is presenting The World at War: 1914-1918. Some might be surprised to hear about an historical exhibit at the Ransom Center, and curator Jean Cannon said that’s what makes their exhibit unique.

“We have great holdings for literature so a lot of the items that you’ll see in the gallery are diaries or letters and items that give a very personal moment of living between 1914 and 1918,” Cannon told us.

The exhibit runs through August 3. The Harry Ransom Center is free and open to the public.

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend, Saturday and Sunday at 6:30pm.