Night At The Movies 2/20: The Right Stuff & more

KLRU Q - Night at the Movies

The 60s are coming alive again with this week’s Night At The Movies! The creator of Mad Men will analyze various aspects of the show and its protagonist, Don Draper. Then, The Right Stuff will put you alongside the first U.S. astronauts during the height of the space race. But first, we’ll start the night with conversations with artists involved in making some of 2015’s best movies.

Variety Studio Episode #301 at 6:30 p.m.

Exclusive conversations between some of the most exciting actors working today. Featuring Cate Blanchett (Carol/Truth) with Ian McKellen (Mr. Holmes), Will Smith (Concussion) with Benicio Del Toro (Sicario), Brie Larson (Room) with Joel Edgerton (Black Mass), Samuel L. Jackson (The Hateful Eight) with Michael Keaton (Spotlight).

On Story Watch Mad Men: A Conversation With Matthew Weiner at 7:30 p.m.

Mad Men creator, Matthew Weiner, dissects the culture, identity, and status quo of the show, and the psychology behind its beloved antihero, Don Draper. Followed by Faraday Okoro’s short film, Full Windsor, about a young boy’s quest to preserve a meaningful piece of his past.

All-star Film Collection The Right Stuff at 8:00 p.m.

The selection and training of the first U.S. astronauts take place amid political maneuvering and media hype.

Arts In Context Shorts: Nathan Felix makes his mark with 6 Pianos

Nathan Felix made his mark in the Austin music scene by composing classical-style music and putting on a show in his North Austin home. But his long term goal is something much bigger.

The idea of Felix’s at home show, Classical Music Kegger, came to him when he saw an opera performance in a train station when he lived in Los Angeles. Felix decided to compose a show with only pianos. Despite the fact that he had never composed a piano piece, nor did he know how to play piano, when Felix returned to his hometown of Austin, he somehow snagged six free pianos off of Craigslist and got to work.

However, Felix wants to give his community more than just the music itself. That’s why he donated the pianos to the youth.

“Part of my way of giving back is donating the pianos to some of the schools or community centers,” Felix said. “I want to start grooming and growing the next crop of young, talented kids.”

Nathan Felix by Ashley Bradley

Educating Students about Native American Culture

November is Native American Heritage Month, and to celebrate Great Promise for American Indians held its 24th annual Powwow and American Indian Heritage Festival on November 7th. While the Powwow has wrapped up, the goal of it’s organizers is ongoing. Great Promise is working to educate youth both in and out of their culture on Native American heritage and traditions.

Self-Defense Class Fights for SAFE Austin

This is the fifth year that the Moy Yat Kung Fu Academy has offered self defense classes for women, but this year they’re doing something a little different.  The entry fee for the class is a donation to SAFE Austin, an organization dedicated to ending cycles of abuse and violence.

KLRU News Briefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend, Saturday and Sunday evenings at 6pm. 

 

Short film highlighting Bruce Jackson’s prison farm photography on KLRU

A new short film from director Deborah S. Esquenazi highlights Bruce Jackson’s visits to 1960s “prison farms” in Texas. Jackson, a renowned folklorist, documentarian and photographer, was one of few documentarians to have received unprecedented access to the southern prison farms, which were modeled after the American slave plantation and occupied lands that plantations stood on before the Civil War. Jackson studied black convict work songs and folk culture, highlighting the parallels between slave plantations and these now-vanished prison farms.

WAKE*UP, DEAD MEN: A Retrospective of Bruce Jackson’s Prison Farm Photography, 1965-1975, coming to KLRU on Oct. 1, showcases Jackson’s photography tracing the roots of the prison farm into today’s massive prison system and industrial prison complexes. The film will be available online through March 2016.

Photo courtesy Deb Esquenazi

Photo courtesy Deb Esquenazi

Deborah S. Esquenazi is an Austin-based documentary film and radio producer, instructor, and video artist. She was a Sundance Documentary Film Fellow at the Sundance Festival in 2014, and Sundance Creative Producing Fellow in 2015. She is currently working on a documentary about the San Antonio Four, four women who were convicted of sexually assaulting two young girls but were later released from prison and are still fighting for full exoneration today. Visit  Esquenazi’s website for details on this upcoming project and her other work.

Indie Lens Pop-Up Stray Dog 10/6

Join KLRU and the Austin Public Library for the Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the documentary Stray Dog. This free event takes place Tuesday, Oct. 6th, at 7 pm at the Austin Public Library Windsor Park Branch 5833 Westminster Dr., Austin, TX, 78723.

Stray_Dog

From the director of the Oscar-nominated Winter’s Bone comes this portrait of a motorcycle-riding Vietnam veteran. There’s much more to Ronnie “Stray Dog” Hall than meets the eye; behind the tattoos and leather vest is a man dedicated to helping his fellow vets and immigrant family as he also comes to terms with his combat experience.

Formerly known as Community Cinema, the long-running screening series has been renamed Indie Lens Pop-Up to strengthen the bond between the Independent Lens television series and local communities, and bring new energy and new audiences to the in-person events as well as online OVEE events and the broadcasts on KLRU. Over the past decade, screenings of Independent Lens films have brought more than 331,000 participants together at over 5,700 events to discuss issues that impact local communities.

Hispanic Heritage Month 2015

KLRU celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with a range of special programs and events that celebrate the Hispanic experience. Year round, KLRU provides content and events that give a diverse perspective on our community.

New programs for this September & October include the documentary On Two Fronts: Latinos & Vietnam.This program, airing on Tuesday, September 22 at 9 pm, examines the Latino experience during a war that placed its heaviest burden on working class youth. Framing the documentary are memoirs of two siblings, Everett and Delia Alvarez, who stood on opposite sides of the Vietnam War, one as a POW and the other protesting at home.

Other programs airing on KLRU for Hispanic Heritage Month:

American Masters Pedro E. Guerrero: A Photographer’s Journey
Friday, September 18 at 8 pm
This film captures the life and work of Pedro Guerrero, a Mexican American photographer born and raised in segregated Mesa, Arizona, who goes on to an international career as photographer of master American artists of the 20th century. Using Guerrero’s words, the film gives the viewer an insider’s look into three of the most iconic American artists of the 20th century: Frank Lloyd Wright, Alexander Calder and Louise Nevelson, as well as important images of modernist architecture.

Arts In Context Shorts Barrio Writers
By empowering teens through creative writing, higher education and creative arts, the Barrio Writers are reinstating the term “Barrio” to its original meaning – community, and embracing it.  This writing community began with small workshops atEl Centro Cultural de Mexico in Santa Ana, California and have now evolved into week long, intensive programs on university campuses. At the end of the week, the Barrio Writers transform their stereotypes into a place of positivity and become empowered in their own words. Watch more Barrio Writers videos from Arts In Context Shorts

POV Don’t Tell Anyone
Monday, September 21 at 9 pm
In a community where silence is seen as necessary for survival, immigrant activist Angy Rivera joins a generation of dreamers ready to push for change in the only home she’s ever known — the United States. Hers is the quintessential America​n success​ story: Rivera is the author of the country’s first and only advice column for undocumented youth, and her YouTube channel boasts over 27,000 views as she comes out of the shadows to inspire her peers.

Rudolfo Anaya: The Magic of Words
Monday, September 21 at 10:30 pm
Rudolfo Anaya was the first Hispanic American writer to achieve major publishing success with his landmark novel, Bless Me, Ultima, in print since 1972. Recipient of the National Medal for the Arts, Anaya has demonstrated a lifelong determination to persevere – through poverty, catastrophic injury and an almost insurmountable artistic struggle to publish – and in the end, succeed. Rudolfo Anaya: The Magic Of Words is a vital reference to the authentic culture of Hispanic New Mexico. And while the wellspring of Anaya’s stories is New Mexico, his insight is invaluable to understand the quest by all Hispanic Americans for cultural identity, recognition and respect.

Arts in Context “Tardeadas”
Thursday,October 1 at 7:30 pm
Through music and community, the band Los Pinkys is keeping the Conjunto musical tradition alive. Los Pinkys are a traditional-style conjunto formed in 1993 and have been performing around the United States ever since. The band is one of the few who continues the long tradition of the Sunday afternoon performance (Tardeadas). Elderly Mexican-American couples share the dance floor with a new crowd of revelers often experiencing their first sounds of conjunto music.

El Taller
Thursday,October 1 at 9 pm and repeats on Sunday, October 4 at 1 pm.
Proyecto Teatro aims to make the arts accessible to the entire community, regardless of income levels, and to reduce social and cultural differences of society. For actor and director Luis Ordaz maintaining a space that leads to human development through the arts is his main reason to keep Talleres Infantiles alive. Talleres Infantiles is a year round Spanish language art program for mostly low income students. We follow Luis Ordaz and a group of theater students and volunteers as they work together to improve their community while keeping their culture alive.

Annual Imagen Awards
Friday, October 2 at 8 pm and repeats on Sunday, October 4 at 2 pm
The 30th  Imagen Awards recognizes and rewards positive portrayals of Latinos in all forms of media, as well as encourages and recognizes the achievements of Latino celebrities and Latino-focused projects, including programs that have aired on PBS.  This year’s nominees include America by the Numbers with Maria Hinojosa, the Children of Giant documentary by Hector Galan, Voces, Palmetto Scene: East coast Migrant Head Start, from South Carolina Educational Television and an on-air spot, Jessica Suarez PSA, out of Vegas PBS.

Voces on PBS “Children of Giant”
Monday, October 5 at 10:00 pm
In 1955, Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, James Dean and a massive crew descended on the Texas town of Marfa to begin production on Giant. Now, 60 years later, “Children of Giant” explores the film’s still timely examination of racial prejudice.  Film by Hector Galan.

Unity – The Latin Tribute to Michael Jackson
Friday, October 9 at 8 pm
The PBS Arts Fall Festival is hosted by international superstar and Grammy-winner Gloria Estefan. The Festival begins October 9 and showcases such titles as Unity, which features 16 songs that inspired musicians from all over Latin America to come together to celebrate and re-imagine hits such as “Smooth Criminal,” “I Want You Back” and “Billie Jean.”

The Hispanic Heritage Awards
Friday, October 9 at 9 pm
Join host Rita Moreno for a celebration of the country’s highest tribute to Latinos by Latinos. The program includes performances and appearances by celebrated Hispanic artists.

Central Texas Gardener
Saturday, October 17 at noon
Meet effervescent Velia Sanchez who designed and maintains a front yard garden complete with colorful meditative nicho. Every month of the year, neighbors stroll through to gather serenity and wonder, along with handfuls of fresh herbs and flowers. Not only only does Velia teach young and old about the wildlife that visit, she also passes along knowledge of Mexican herbal remedies for health and good taste.

Arts In Context Shorts: Sweet Art

AICS SWEET ART ANNIE DECORATINGEach time Annie Varghese starts a new cake, she feels like it’s her first one, and she won’t stop until she reaches perfection. She found her passion for cake sculpting from baking cakes for her children’s birthdays, and now she uses traditional flavors and ingredients to transform her cakes into a limitless, fictional world. She believes that every cake is a chance to explore her imagination, and she uses clean lines and balanced color tones to add details and create larger, more extravagant cakes. Her passion shows that cake isn’t just a sweet treat but an exciting art medium.

 

Arts in Context: Somos Krudas

Having survived under a totalitarian regime, Cuban hip-hop duo Krudas Cubensi refuses to compromise. Lyrically, nothing is off limits as they spit fiery lines about politics and sexuality with a frankness and openness that is seldom seen. With a persistent Afro-Cuban rhythm, Odaymara Cuesta and Olivia Prendes use their art as a weapon “to fight against oppression, for justice, for balance, for our rights, to celebrate the life.” Now based out of Austin, Texas, Krudas Cubensi continues their fight for social justice through their incendiary, original hip-hop.

Arts in Context Shorts: Wildly Strange

This week’s Arts in Context Shorts features Ralph Eugene Meatyard’s eerie photographs that possess a “wildly strange” nature. Often employing masks, dolls and sometimes his own children set against abandoned buildings and other eerie backdrops, Meatyard’s work differed from the documentary, photo-journalism approach that defined the mainstream definition of the photographer in the 1950s. His photographs blur (often quite literally) the distinctions between literature and visual art, encouraging viewers to explore the role of fiction in the photographic images and their representation of reality.