Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, and we’re celebrating with KLRU, KLRU Q and online programming!

On KLRU, look out for these shows this month:

Monday, May 2 at 10:30 p.m., don’t miss Our American Family: The Furutas. Through hard work, the Furutas, a Japanese American family of Wintersburg, CA established a successful goldfish farm, only to have their business devastated and family separated in the wake of WWII. Following years in an Arizona relocation camp, their indomitable spirit prevails as they return home and band together to pursue the American dream a second time.

Review a transitional year in the life of farmer, slow food advocate and sansei David “Mas” Masumoto, and his relationship with his daughter Nikiko, who returns to the family farm with the intention of stepping into her father’s work boots Tuesday, May 10 at 10:30 p.m. on Changing Season: On The Matsumoto Family Farm.

 POV The World Before Her tells the tale of two Indias on Monday, May 16 at 10 p.m. In one, Ruhi Singh is a small-town girl competing in Bombay to win the Miss India pageant — a ticket to stardom in a country wild about beauty contests. In the other India, Prachi Trivedi is the young, militant leader of a fundamentalist Hindu camp for girls, where she preaches violent resistance to Western culture, Christianity and Islam. 

In 1975, Giap, a pregnant Vietnamese refugee, escapes Saigon in a boat and within weeks is working on an assembly line in Indiana. Decades later, her aspiring filmmaker son documents her final day of work at America’s last ironing board factory Giap’s Last Day at the Ironing Board Factory. Tune in Tuesday, May 17 at 10:30 p.m.

Chinese Couplets is a riveting, personal story with many layers that takes us from California to Cuba, Hawaii and China.  Part memoir, part history, part investigation, filmmaker Felicia Lowe searches for answers about her mother’s emigration to America during the Chinese Exclusion era. The film airs Tuesday, May 24 at 10:30 p.m.

Asia Society Texas Center:  Building Bridges of Understanding explores how famed Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi’s landmark building came to fruition in Houston’s Museum District Tuesday, May 31 at 10:30 p.m. It examines the history of the organization, the design and construction of this one-of-a-kind cultural center in Houston, Texas.

On KLRU Q, Lucky Chow will air on the following Saturdays at 5:30 p.m.:

Lucky Chow Koreatown U.S.A. visits New York and Los Angeles – home to the two largest Korean populations in the United States – to explore what distinguishes each. Both are 24-hour hubs of food and drinking culture on May 7. However, New York City’s Koreatown covers just one block, whereas Los Angeles’ Koreatown seems like a city unto itself.

On Lucky Chow Northern Thai Cuisine on May 14, see how Andy Ricker, a carpenter-turned-chef from Portland, Oreg., brings “authentic” Thai food to America. At a food festival in Las Vegas, Ricker prepares a welcome dinner for the participating chefs at the much-loved Lotus of Siam, with chef/owner Saipin Chutima at the helm. At the table, Jet Tila rhapsodizes about the days when his family opened America’s first Thai grocery store in Hollywood.

Filipinos comprise the second-largest Asian-American population nationwide, yet their cuisine is relatively unknown. On Lucky Chow Filipino Entrepreneurs, PJ Quesada, founder of the Filipino Food Movement, explains Filipino cuisine on May 21. Meet restaurateur Nicole Ponseca, who left her life as a advertising executive in New York to give voice to her culture through food. And finally, the two friends behind Bling Bling Dumplings manufacture thousands of dumplings – from scratch, at home – to serve at Coachella and other festivals.

Lucky Chow Bay Area’s Pacific Rim Cuisine introduces Olivia Wu, designer of the original Asian restaurant concepts on Google’s “campus” on May 28. After a career in Silicon Valley, two retired Japanese executives returned to their ancestral farming roots and constructed an indoor vertical farm which services some of the top restaurants in the Bay Area. The episode ends at a now-mainstream tofu factory.

Lucky Chow Chinatown, Reimagined tracks the evolution of Chinese food in America through the lens of two third-generation Chinese-American restaurateurs on June 4.

Additionally, Q will air the following episodes of Pacific Heartbeat Season 5  Saturdays at 6 p.m.:

In New Zealand, the government is about to sell off a third of its publicly owned state houses. With a growing housing crisis and a lack of affordable homes, what will the future of housing look like and where will the thousands of state house tenants end up living? Pacific Heartbeat A Place To Call Home attempts to shed light on this timely issue on May 7.

Pilipo Solatorio lives on the island of Molokai. He is the last to hold the cultural traditions, music, and stories of a sacred Hawaiian valley that has been home to his family for hundreds of years. Pacific Heartbeat Sons Of Halawa is an intimate portrait of his search for a successor to keep the cultural traditions alive. Don’t miss it on May 14.

If you had never heard of an airplane or a refrigerator, would you think it was a miracle when one arrived? When the American military landed on a remote island in the South Pacific during World War II, the islanders were amazed by America’s fantastic cargo. The John Frum Movement was born: a unique religion now considered the last surviving “Cargo Cult”.  On May 21, Pacific Heartbeat Waiting For John explores the history and last vestiges of this extraordinary religion, and in the process asks, where do our prophets come from? And what makes people believe?

On May 28, Pacific Heartbeat Dream Big: Nankuli At The Fringe follows the students of Nanakuli High and Intermediate School Performing Arts Center (NPAC) who were given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to travel halfway across the globe to perform at the Fringe Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Surfing is not only a pillar of village life, but it’s also a means to prestige in Papua New Guinea. On June 4, Pacific Heartbeat Splinters tell the story the months leading up to the first National Surf Championships and explores the hopes and dreams of the surfers, and how surfing has led to societal changes in a male dominated culture.

Want to experience this rich culture with us online? Celebrate with student films! Watch these @FilmSchoolShorts mini-movies on YOUR time. Our Film School Shorts Asian Pacific American Heritage Month YouTube playlist featuring student films is live!

 

Q Night At The Movies 4/30: Charade & More

KLRU Q - Night at the Movies

Q Night at the Movies celebrates two iconic movie stars this week: Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn. First on back-to-back episodes of Hollywood Idols the legacies of the two actors are told, respectively. Then On Story hears from two female writers, Nicole Perlman and Angela Kang, who discuss how they handle working in a realm of male-dominated comic book adaptations. We end the night back with Grant and Hepburn who star in Charade, a film about a woman (Hepburn) who several men (including Grant) pursue to get to her murdered husband’s fortune.

Hollywood Idols Cary Grant: The Leading Man at 6:30 p.m.
With a winning combination of comic style and leading-man charisma, Cary Grant was the essence of a star. But the suave exterior concealed a complex individual. Family photos, archival footage and film clips vividly convey Grant’s journey from lonely, working-class beginnings to the peak of Hollywood royalty. This profile includes the story of his discovery by Mae West.

Hollywood Idols Audrey Hepburn Remembered at 7 p.m.
Audrey Hepburn was one of movies’ best-loved stars. She was blessed with beauty, talent, an elegant sophistication, and an enduring aura of youthful innocence. As Goodwill Ambassador for UNICEF she spoke for the world’s suffering children and families, earning affection and admiration from around the globe. Clips capture her commenting on her career, and the family and friendships that were her priority.

On Story Zombies & Groot – Bringing Comics To Life at 7:30 p.m.
Nicole Perlman (Guardian of the Galaxy) and Angela Kang (The Walking Dead) explore navigating a male-dominated industry as female genre writers. The women discuss tackling comic book adaptations, the importance of character development, and the fine line between staying true to the spirit of the source material while also breathing new life into preexisting storylines.

Corinth Films Collection Charade at 8 p.m.
Romance and suspense in Paris, as a woman (Audrey Hepburn) is pursued by several men (including Cary Grant) who want a fortune her murdered husband had stolen. Who can she trust?

First Annual To The Contrary Women’s Film Festival

To the Contrary

To The Contrary, a PBS show dedicated to discussing issues from diverse perspectives, will hold their first annual film festival. Winners will have their documentaries broadcasted on national television.

First launched in 1992, To The Contrary has given a space for women to discuss issues impacting themselves, children and their diverse communities. Almost 25 years later, they are still committed to this mission and through this film festival, will work to achieve it in a new way.

If you are a first-time documentarian who completed a program in 2015 which highlights the struggles of women, girls or diverse communities, consider applying to this feeless contest. Winners’ documentaries will air on To The Contrary, which airs on 91% of PBS stations nationwide, on Canadian television and Voice of America internationally.The five categories include:

  • Current event documentaries that highlight issues in the United States 
  • Current event documentaries that highlight issues globally
  • Documentaries chronicling the history of a woman’s movement from any era (can be profiles of influential women)
  • Documentaries about the changing cultural attitudes on gender from a woman’s perspective
  • Undergraduate or graduate student documentaries that fall into any of the above categories

Submissions opened on March 14 and will close May 15. Winners will be announced July 29.

To read the full rules and guidelines, click here.

Humanities In The Spotlight: 4/24 & 5/1

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On this brand new KLRU program, distinguished alumni and professors from the University of Texas at Austin discuss the importance of humanities.

Kicking off the series on April 24 are Elizabeth Richmond-Garza and Miriam Schoenfield at 1 p.m. Richmond-Garza is a Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor of English and Director of the Program in Cooperative Literature at the University of Texas at Austin. Her talk focuses on the development of comparative literature as a discipline. Schoefield is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin and she speaks on the nature of good.

Joining us right after at 1:30 p.m. are Julius Glickman and Gordon Appleman. Professor Jeremi Suri interviews prominent attorneys and distinguished University of Texas alumni, Julius Glickman and Gordon Appleman about the importance of liberal arts education.

Finishing off the day are Douglas Bruster and Cherise Smith at 2 p.m. Douglas Bruster is the Mody C. Boatright Regents Professor in American and English Literature at the University of Texas at Austin. His talk focuses on the enduring relevance of Shakespeare. Cherise Smith is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History and Director of the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She discusses the racial critique in artwork by Michael Ray Charles.

The next week on May 1, start the day off with Susan Grant Palumbo and R. Kent Mcgaughy at 1 p.m. Associate Professor Janet Davis interviews finance professionals and distinguished University of Texas alumni, R. Kent McGaughy and Susan Grant Palombo. They discuss how education in the humanities has influenced their careers.

After that at 1:30 p.m., Humanities in the Spotlight presents Domino R. Perez and L. Michael White. Domino R. Perez is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Director of the Center for Mexican-American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She speaks about how popular fiction can unite diverse audiences. L. Michael White is the Ronald Nelson Smith Chair in Religious Studies and Director of the Insitute for the Study of Antiquity and Christian Origins at the University of Texas at Austin. He talks about the importance of studying ancient fictional letters as historical documents.

Kimberly E. Monday and G. Sealy Massingil finish off the series at 2 p.m. Janet Davis interviews them as they discuss how their education in the humanities impacts the life and death decisions they make as surgeons.

Q Night At The Movies 4/23: Chariots Of Fire & More

KLRU Q - Night at the Movies

This week, Q Night at the Movies looks back and celebrates innovators and groundbreakers. First, Variety speaks with actors who had standout performances in film in 2015. Then, Pioneers of Television pays tribute to some of the first female television comediennes, including Joan Rivers, Lucille Ball, Betty White, Carol Burnett and more. After that, On Story talks with Norman Lear, a television writer and producer who helped pave the way for how Hollywood intertwines situational comedy and progressive ideals. We end the night with Chariots of Fire, which showcases the trials and victories of British runners Harold Abrahams and Eric Liddell in the 1924 Olympics.

Variety Episode #303 at 5:30 p.m.
The actors responsible for the most exciting performances of the year talk about their work-and more. Featuring Seth Rogen (Steve Jobs) with Jennifer Jason Leigh (The Hateful Eight), Amy Schumer (Trainwreck) with Lily Tomlin (Grandma), Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Walk) with Paul Dano (Love & Mercy), Isabella Rossellini (Joy) with Charlotte Rampling (45 Years).

Pioneers of Television Funny Ladies at 6:30 p.m.
This episode includes the first standup comediennes to appear on television, including Joan Rivers and the late Phyllis Diller. Funny Ladies also looks at Lucille Ball’s breakthrough on I Love Lucy and the sitcom stars who followed, including Mary Tyler Moore, Betty White and Marla Gibbs. Also, television’s most beloved variety star, Carol Burnett.

On Story Norman Lear – A Retrospective at 7:30 p.m.
Perhaps one of the most influential contributors to the landscape of situational comedies and progressive writing in Hollywood, Norman Lear transformed a genre known for play-it-safe humor into a platform for how Americans experience social issues. In this week’s On Story, Lear remembers a few of his favorite episodes and how he created some of the most beloved characters in the history of television.

All-star Film Collection Chariots Of Fire at 8 p.m.
Personal goals spur British runners Harold Abrahams (Ben Cross) and Eric Liddell (Ian Charleson) to compete in the 1924 Olympics.

KLRU reschedules 4/17 shows interrupted by rain

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Due to the heavy rains on Sunday evening, KLRU experienced some technical difficulties that interrupted programming. We will be rebroadcasting the Sunday night dramas so fans can have a chance to watch without interruption before the new episodes air on April 24th.

Saturday, April 23 starting at 8 pm
8 pm Grantchester Episode 4
9 pm Mr. Selfridge Episode 4

Sunday, April 24
10 pm Doctor Blake “My Brother’s Keeper”
11 pm Doctor Blake “This Time and This Place” will start at 11 pm

The Father Brown originally scheduled for Sunday will air later this year.

You can watch online now here:

 

Q Night At The Movies 4/16: New Episode of On Story & More

KLRU Q - Night at the Movies

JohnSingletonQuoteCardStandardQ Night At The Movies kicks off with back-to-back episodes of Variety. After that, On Story brings on John Singleton to discuss his influences and process. Finishing off the night is The Remains of the Day, a movie about a butler’s struggle between his devotion to work and his love for a housekeeper.

Variety Episode #301 at 5:30 p.m.
Exclusive conversations between some of the most exciting actors working today. Featuring Cate Blanchett (Carol/Truth) with Ian McKellen (Mr. Holmes), Will Smith (Concussion) with Benicio Del Toro (Sicario), Brie Larson (Room) with Joel Edgerton (Black Mass), Samuel L. Jackson (The Hateful Eight) with Michael Keaton (Spotlight).

Variety Episode #302 at 6:29 p.m.
An intimate conversation between some of the greatest actors working today. Featuring Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs) with Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn), Carey Mulligan (Suffragette) with Elizabeth Banks (Love & Mercy), Steve Carell (The Big Short) with Rooney Mara (Carol), Bryan Cranston (Trumbo) with Jason Segel (The End of the Tour).

On Story John Singleton’s Classic Influences at 7:30 p.m.
John Singleton, the youngest and first African American filmmaker to win an Academy Award for his work on Boyz in the Hood, discusses his process, influences, and inspirations, from the work of acclaimed playwright August Wilson to pioneering directors Spike Lee and Federico Fellini.

All-star Film Collection The Remains Of The Day at 8 p.m.
An English butler’s (Anthony Hopkins) devotion to service keeps him from the housekeeper (Emma Thompson) he loves in 1930s England.

Arts In Context Shorts: Austin Community Steelpan Band

More than an after-school program, the Austin Community Steelband has created an expressive place to uplift local youth through learning steelpan music.  Originating in Trinidad, steelbands served as a way for poor and oppressed people to come together and express themselves through music. Executive Director Paula Beaird and Musical Director Cecil Francis continue manifest the soul of Trinidad by providing a free musical instruction where underprivileged children learn skills like memorization, focus and listening that they can take home and apply to their lives at home and in school.  With an emphasis on collaborative and enriching learning, the students have turned it into more than an after-school program.  They are now a part of a vibrant, historically-rich musical community that extends beyond the city limits of Austin, Texas.

KLRU Celebrates Earth Month!

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Here at KLRU, we love our planet and proudly celebrate Earth Day. With it coming up on April 22nd, what better way to pay tribute to our big blue planet than to air programs that embrace nature and shed light on problems the Earth currently faces?

On April 21, Arts In Context Thirst explores an art installation that takes on the pressing issue of water shortages and challenges the community to action at 7:30 p.m. Presented by the Center For Women & Their Work, Thirst memorializes the loss of over 300 million trees that died in the Texas in the drought of 2011.

From April 25-30 at 8 p.m., the miniseries, National Parks: America’s Best Idea, will chronologically work its way through the history of the creation of our national parks.

On April 25, National Parks: America’s Best Idea The Scripture Of Nature (1851-1890) tells how the astonishing beauty of Yosemite Valley and the geyser wonderland of Yellowstone give birth to the radical idea of creating national parks for the enjoyment of everyone; John Muir becomes their eloquent defender. In addition, Symphony of the Soil artistically explores the miraculous substance soil at 10 p.m.

April 26 brings National Parks: America’s Best Idea The Last Refuge (1890-1915), which discusses how a young president, Theodore Roosevelt, becomes one of the national parks’ greatest champions; in Yellowstone, a magnificent species is rescued from extinction; and in Yosemite, John Muir fights the battle of his life to save a beautiful valley. But before that, at 7 p.m. National Parks of Texas: In Contact With Beauty shares how these parks were created and reveals the secrets they hold.

National Parks: America’s Best Idea The Empire Of Grandeur (1915-1919) airs April 27. In John Muir’s absence, a new leader steps forward on behalf of America’s remaining pristine places; a new federal agency is created to protect the parks; and in Arizona, a fight breaks out over the fate of the grandest canyon on earth.

On April 28, National Parks: America’s Best Idea Going Home (1920-1933) tells the story of a Nebraska housewife who searches for peace and inspiration in park after park, while a honeymoon couple seeks fame and adventure in the Grand Canyon; and the future of the Great Smoky Mountains becomes caught in a race with the lumbermen’s saws.

National Parks: America’s Best Idea Great Nature (1933-1945) explains that in the midst of an economic catastrophe and then a world war, the national parks provide a source of much-needed jobs and then much-needed peace on April 29; the park idea changes to include new places and new ways of thinking; and in Wyoming, battle lines are drawn along the front of the Teton Range.

A stubborn iconoclast fights a lonely battle on behalf of a species nearly everyone hates on National Parks: America’s Best Idea The Morning Of Creation (1946-1980) on April 30.  America’s “Last Frontier” becomes a testing ground for the future of the park idea; and in unprecedented numbers, American families create unforgettable memories, passing on a love of the parks to the next generation.

KLRU Q also crafted some of their April programming in honor of our planet.

On April 15, Q starts the night off with Big Burn: American Experience at 8 p.m. This one-hour special highlights the hundreds of wildfires that raged across the Northern Rockies during the summer of 1910. Then at 9 p.m., America’s First Forest: Carl Schenck And The Ashtev examines the pivotal role played by pioneering forestry educator Carl Schenck and his founding of America’s first school of forestry-the Biltmore Forest School. To finish the night off, Jens Jensen The Living Green profiles the unsung pioneering landscape architect who became one of America’s most influential urban designers and early conservationists at 10 p.m.

Then on Earth Day itself, April 22, experience the battle for a living planet in the first big-picture exploration of the environmental movement, spanning 50 years of grassroots and global activism on American Masters A Fierce Green Fire at 8 p.m. After that, Green Fire: Aldo Leopold And A Land Ethic For Our Time highlights Aldo Leopold’s extraordinary career as an environmentalist, tracing how he shaped and influenced the modern environmental movement. Finally, Symphony of the Soil artistically explores the miraculous substance soil at 10 p.m.

Q Night at the Movies 4/2: Sleepless in Seattle & More

KLRU Q - Night at the Movies

Q Night at the Movies embraces the joys and perils of romance this week. We start the night off with Hollywood Idols discussing the career and life of Casablanca star, Ingrid Bergman. Then on On Story, screenwriters of some modern day romantic comedies explain what they consider when writing their screenplays. Finally, Sleepless In Seattle tells the story of two people who fall in love at a weird time in their respective lives.

Hollywood Idols Ingrid Bergman Remembered at 7 p.m.
Ingrid Bergman possessed a natural and vulnerable persona, which was both genuine and alluring. Her cinematic contributions included such movie classics as Casablanca and Anastasia. Appearing together for the first time, Ingrid’s daughters Pia Lindstrom and Isabella Rossellini take a personal look back at their mother’s life beyond Bergman’s acting career.

On Story Romantic Comedies at 7:30 p.m.
The screenwriters behind Never Been Kissed, Safe Haven, Going the Distance and He’s Just Not That Into You contemplate the important balance of relationship, conflict and originality when creating romantic comedies. Followed by the short film, Do Over by David Fabelo.

All-star Film Collection Sleepless In Seattle at 8 p.m.
A recently engaged newswoman (Meg Ryan) becomes obsessed with meeting a grieving widower (Tom Hanks) she heard on a late-night radio call-in show.