Civic Summit: Obesity, Weight Loss and Body Acceptance Online Screening 9/17 at 3:30pm

CIVIC SUMMIT OBESITY SHOW.1

Join KLRU and the Obesity Action Coalition for an online social screening of Civic Summit: Obesity, Weight Loss and Body Acceptance on Wednesday, September 17 at 3:30pm. The program, which first aired in March, is a conversation about the complex issues and experiences surrounding obesity and weight loss.

You can find the screening here.

The discussion will use a platform called OVEE, which allows viewers to watch and discuss PBS programs together from anywhere. Conversations that happen during an OVEE are enlightening and engaging.

You’ll also get the chance to ask questions of our panelists from the show. Joining us are Dr. Connie Stapleton, psychologist and author of Eat it Up! and Thriving! – Triumph after Trauma, Joe Nadglowski, President/CEO of Obesity Action Coalition, Abby Lentz, Founder of HeavyWeight Yoga, and John Archibeque, Bariatric Surgery Program Coordinator at The Bariatric Center at St. David’s North Austin Medical Center. We’ll discuss the struggles members of the obese community face and the many options available to them.

KLRU NewsBrief: Huston-Tillotson Launches First Master’s Program

HT Masters

This weekend during PBS NewsHour, Austin’s oldest university is beginning a new chapter in its 140 year history.

Huston-Tillotson University will launch its first ever Master’s program in January. The degree is a Master’s in Educational Leadership with a principal certification. Principals in Texas are required to have Master’s degrees but most program offer the certification separately. Dr. Ruth Kane, Department of Educator Preparation Department Chair, said the program prepares graduates to fill a void in school administrations in our region.

“Research says that it’s important that students have a person who is their teacher or administrator or their counselor or even their librarian that looks like them, who they have an easier time relating to,” Dr. Kane said. “We have many wonderful Anglo principals out there but they can’t be everything to African-American and Hispanic students.”

Corey Wiggins, a 6th grade English Language Arts teacher at Kealing Middle School, is hoping to join the program in January. He’s been teaching for three years and said he does think students would benefit from more African-American or Hispanic principals in area schools.

“I think that just having that awareness of knowing how certain things work in certain families based on socioeconomic background and things like that, it really makes a really big impact,” Wiggins said.

The program is four semesters and is designed for working teachers.

This story airs Sunday evening at 6:30pm during PBS NewsHour Weekend. 

 

 

In the Studio: Ross Douthat tapes Overheard 9/18

Overheard taping announcement

Please join KLRU’s Overheard with Evan Smith for an interview with Ross Douthat on September 18 at 4pm in KLRU’s Studio 6A (map). Doors open at 3:45pm. The event is free but an RSVP is required.

Josh Haner/The New York Times

Josh Haner/The New York Times

Ross Douthat is a conservative Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times. He joined the Times in 2009, previously working as a senior editor at The Atlantic. He has written a number of books, including Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics and Privilege: Harvard and the Education of the Ruling Class. He is also a film critic for National Review. Douthat is in Austin to speak at The Austin Institute for the Study of Family and Culture immediately following our taping.

We hope you’ll be there as Overheard with Evan Smith begins a fifth season of interviews featuring engaging conversations with fascinating people. The show airs on PBS stations nationally and presents a wide range of thoughtmakers and tastemakers from the fields of politics, journalism, business, arts, sports and more. Please join us and be part of the studio audience at this taping with Ross Douthat. And don’t forget you can watch past episodes anytime at klru.org/overheard.

KLRU NewsBriefs: Education Advocates Focus on Attendance, UT Program Supports Financially Independent Students

HHH Screenshot

The school year is now in full swing, and we have two education stories during PBS NewsHour this weekend to help ease you into things.

On Saturday, we hear from AISD Interim Superintendent Dr. Paul Cruz about why attendance is one of the district’s top priorities.

“We can tell from early on, as early as 5th grade, we can look at if a student is meeting promotion standards, if the student has a good attendance record and if a student is passing all of his or her classes,” Dr. Cruz said. “If that’s not happening, there’s a student who is at risk of not graduating on time with his or her class. [Our first step is] an immediate conversation with the parents to see what we can do to help out the student and the family.”

On Sunday, we hear about Horns Helping Horns, a group from New Student Services on the UT campus which offers emotional and financial support to students who are not receiving any financial help from family.

“I think students have challenges no matter what their background is and I think our students and our community a lot of times because they don’t have that emotional and financial support are dealing with a lot more stuff,” Esmer Bedia, the Horns Helping Horns Coordinator said. “But, the majority of our students are succeeding and graduating and I think that’s because we’re telling them, ya’ll can do it, you will do it and they do succeed.”

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend, Saturday and Sunday evening at 6:30. 

 

 

 

Civic Summit: Mayoral Candidate Forum is now online

Austin voters will elect 10 council members in November from 10 new geographic districts. They’ll also elect a new mayor who will be the only person on the dais tasked with governing the city as a whole. On Wednesday, August 27, KLRU and the Austin Urban Land Institute hosted the first televised mayoral debate of the election cycle.

Steve Adler, Sheryl Cole, Mike Martinez, Todd Phelps and Randall Stephens answered questions from moderator Jennifer Stayton, host of Morning Edition on KUT 90.5, Austin’s NPR station. Most of the conversation centered around transportation as well as how the mayoral candidates plan to manage a larger, more diverse City Council.

Watch the video above to hear each candidate’s plan to move Austin forward. Election Day is November 4.

KLRU NewsBriefs: Drought impacts state’s freshwater supply

Matagorda Screenshot

This weekend during PBS NewsHour we have two stories that’ll make you appreciate your local swimming hole over the holiday weekend. Both stories come from our partners at The Texas Tribune.

Labor Day tubers heading for the Guadalupe River may want to watch our story from the Tribune’s Alana Rocha on Saturday. Riders are seeing slower currents and at some spots they have to get out and walk.

“With the reduced spring flow, the speed of the current is so slow that what normally a float trip would require a six-pack – now will require a case,” Bill West of the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority quipped.

A longer version of this story is available on The Texas Tribune’s website.

On Sunday, our story travels further south from Austin, all the way to Matagorda Bay. The state’s second largest estuary is at the intersection of the inter-coastal waterway and the Colorado River. Less rain means less freshwater flowing into the area, which is harming seafood and the businesses that depend on it.

“For the Bay to recover we need several things: we need a lot of rain. Also we need to look for cooperative management of our freshwater inflows into the bay,” Leslie Hartman, Matagorda Bay Ecosystem Leader for Texas Parks and Wildlife said. “Certainly people in Austin need fresh water but our bays need fresh water as well.

You can see an extended version of that story here.

 KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend at 6:30pm on Saturday and Sunday. 

KLRU NewsBriefs: Expanding Health Education in Austin and Harris County Jail program helps female inmates

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On Saturday during PBS NewsHour Weekend, we hear about an Austin based non-profit establishing innovative techniques in the realm of healthy living education.

KLRU intern Bria Lott brings us the story about WeViva, an organization dedicated to promoting healthy eating and regular fitness habits to adults living in Austin’s low income communities. They provide a team of traveling nutritionists and fitness instructors to people who might not have access to these resources otherwise.

“We bring it to locations that may not have that supportive environment built in. Maybe they’re typically unsafe neighborhoods or people don’t want to go outside, but by bringing something to them that’s fun and enjoyable and free they’ll want to come out for it,” Founder Carolyn Haney said.

In the beginning stages WeViva started in only one neighborhood. They now serve 14 communities across Austin with intentions for growth in the near future.

On Sunday, our story comes from our partners at The Texas Tribune. Reporter Alana Rocha went inside the Harris County Jail to talk to female inmates participating in the “We’ve Been There Done That” rehabilitation program.

Most of the women have been charged with prostitution and those sentenced to the program must serve a minimum of 90 days, time that counts toward their sentence. The program has been so successful that the 83rd state legislature passed a law to establish prostitution courts elsewhere in Texas.

You can learn more about the program in the Tribune’s story here.

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally during PBS NewsHour Weekend at 6:30 on Saturday and Sunday evening. 

KLRU NewsBriefs: Austin’s Growing Muslim Community and a New Farm School

Muslim Prayer Meeting

On Saturday during PBS NewsHour we hear about Austin’s growing Muslim population. Muslims around the world marked the end of Ramadan this week with Eid al-Fitr. Thousands of worshipers gathered at the North Austin Event Center on Monday to pray and listen to a sermon. It was a huge turnout for the growing community in Austin, and next  year organizers are planning to move to an even bigger venue.

“Every year is more than we can handle,” Imam Islam Mossaad of the North Austin Community Center said Monday.

Imam Islam said that growth comes from immigrants from all over the world, as well as new converts.

“Muslims [are] spread out throughout the rest of the world, 1.5 billion Muslims, [and] in Austin that diversity is reflected. But also with the added touch of people who are Caucasian-American or African-American or Latino-American who are also coming into Islam,” Imam Islam said. “You have more than 80 different countries represented here today, probably more than that, but we are all also Americans at the same time and so we practice our faith here freely.”

On Sunday, our story is about Austin’s first ever farm school, opening this fall. Farmer Starter grew out of Farmshare Austin, a non-profit focused on educating Central Texans about farming and increasing access to organic, locally-grown food.

“It’s a very challenging business and this is a kind of challenging environment to do it in but we feel that local organic food is a human right and that people should have access to that kind of product and so we want to make sure that it’s widely available in our community,” Farmshare Austin Executive Director Taylor Cook said.

Enrolled students will live and work on the Farmer Starter farm, 10 miles east of Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, for six months. They will learn seed starting, harvesting, marketing, as well as financial and business planning, among other skills.

Farmshare Austin is currently trying to raise $50,000 in an Indiegogo campaign to fund construction and student scholarships. You can learn more about the school on their website.

KLRU NewsBriefs air locally on Saturday and Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend starting at 6:30pm. 

 

KLRU NewsBriefs: E3 Alliance Central Texas Education Profile

Profile Explainer

This weekend during PBS NewsHour we talk to the E3 Alliance about their 2014 Central Texas Education Profile, an in-depth report of educational data covering trends and outcomes for the entire Central Texas region.

On Saturday, we talk to Susan Dawson, Executive Director of E3.

“We use [the data] to inform the community and inform better decision making around education, whether it’s for superintendents and school districts, business and community leaders, for nonprofits who work in the education space, policy makers, all of us throughout the region have different pieces of impact on the education space and it’s to inform that impact through objective data,” Dawson said.

Dawson told us Central Texas is unique because of the area’s rapid growth. Texas has the fastest growing student population of all 50 states in the country and Central Texas’ student population is growing at twice the state’s rate, and of that growth, low income students and English Language Learners are growing at twice that rate.

“So the students who we’re working hardest to help succeed are growing at twice the rate of the region which is already twice the rate of the fastest growing state in the entire country,” Dawson emphasized.

On Sunday, we talk to E3′s Director of Policy and Research, Shawn Thomas. Thomas explained some of this year’s findings regarding our region’s dropout rate.

“For the last decade, we’ve seen that our graduation rates for low income students were lower than graduation rates for low income students in the other urban areas across the state including Houston, Dallas, El Paso and San Antonio. But, this year we saw that change for the first time with our 2012 graduation rates,” Thomas said. “We do know that there’s a very strong relationship between attendance and graduation rates and we know that attendance patterns in our region have changed over the past few years as well.”

You can see the entire E3 Alliance Central Texas Education Profile on the organization’s website.

KLRU News Briefs air locally on Saturday and Sunday during PBS NewsHour Weekend starting at 6:30pm. 

KLRU Mayoral Forum August 27 – Presented with the Austin Urban Land Institute

Civic Summit

By now you’ve probably heard the news: Austin voters will elect 10 council members in November from 10 new geographic districts. They’ll also elect a new mayor, the only person on the dais tasked with governing the city as a whole. KLRU and the Austin Urban Land Institute are excited to announce we will host one of the first mayoral debates of the election cycle, just days after filing closes, moderated by Jennifer Stayton of KUT News.

During Civic Summit: Mayoral Candidate Forum we’ll hear each candidate’s plan to move Austin forward and find out how each will navigate a new council structure with 10 distinct points of view.

To participate in the forum candidates must have officially filed all of the necessary paperwork required to appear on the ballot. Each candidate must also show evidence of a campaign. That includes, but is not limited to, distribution of volunteers and contributors, presence of a headquarters, campaign staff, and campaign appearances. Candidacy must also be significant, meaning the candidate can demonstrate voter interest and support either in the form of independent and reliable polling or media coverage.

The forum will take place in KLRU’s Studio 6A on August 27 starting at 7pm and will be open to the public. Doors open at 6:30pm. An RSVP link will be coming soon. The forum will be broadcast on KLRU the following evening, Thursday, August 28 at 8pm.