Q Night at the Movies 6/25

KLRU Q - Night at the Movies

Remember Hollywood icon Audrey Hepburn in a special program and be on the lookout for rich eligible bachelors with our screening of ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’ on Q Night at the Movies.

Hollywood IdolsAudrey Hepburn Remembered‘ – airs at 7 pm

Audrey Hepburn was one of movies’ best-loved stars. She was blessed with beauty, talent, an elegant sophistication, and an enduring aura of youthful innocence. Clips capture her commenting on her career, and the family and friendships that were her priority. The program features remembrances from her closest friends and family.

On StoryEpisode #611‘ – airs at 7:30 pm

Austin Film Festival’s ‘On Story’ is a half-hour series that gives a behind-the-scenes look at the creative process of the country’s most beloved movies and TV shows. The show is a mash-up of footage of screenwriter and film-makers discussing their craft and films. Each episode is thematically paired with one or two short films, with an introduction from the film’s writer or director. LA Times film critic Kenneth Turan says: “‘On Story’ is film school in a box, a lifetime’s worth of film-making knowledge squeezed into half-hour packages.”

All-star Film CollectionGentlemen Prefer Blondes‘ – airs at 8 pm

Two showgirls on the lookout for rich eligible bachelors run into numerous complications during a trip to Paris.

Highlights June 26- July 2

KLRU Highlights

Tune into this episode of Dancing On The Edge on Sunday at 7 pm to chart the Louis Lester Band’s ascent, with Stanley’s help, from a downbeat jazz cellar to the Imperial Hotel and a party attended by an admiring prince and a moneyed American.

Next at 8 pm Sunday on Endeavor Season 3 on MasterpieceArcadia,” the death of an artist in a house-fire leaves Oxford police baffled. Then, when a young housewife dies seemingly of a mysterious “tummy bug” that has sickened half the police force, Morse’s investigation leads him to an inner-city supermarket.

The killer claims to highlight the ills of contemporary European society as his second “truth” unfolds. An enigmatic hosteler crosses the paths of Karl and Elise once more. Are they any closer to an answer? Watch at 9:30 pm Sunday on Tunnel.

On Monday on POVThe Look Of Silence,” an Oscar nominated film, follow an optometrist as he identifies the men who killed his brother in the 1965 Indonesian genocide. The film, winner of more than 50 awards, shows viewers how he confronts the accused while testing their eyes and demands they accept responsibility. Tune in at 9 pm.

Travel to Los Angeles with Genealogy Roadshow as they examine a family’s connection to the legendary Hollywood pharmacy, Schwabb’s; a link to one of the first African-American college graduates; a family tree wrapped in a genealogical web that has captivated the Roadshow team for years; and more. Watch on Tuesday at 7 pm.

Next at 8 pm Tuesday on GreeksThe Good Strife,” watch as ancient Greeks strive for excellence, strife proves to be an inescapable certainty-and it’s not long before the rising civilization and all that it promises will face its gravest tests.

Later at 9 pm Tuesday on Frontline, join writer and historian Jelani Cobb as he examines the Newark Police Department, one of the many trouble police forced in America ordered to reform.

Tune in at 10:30 pm Tuesday as God & Governing touches on topics such as guns, education, abortion, the death penalty and marriage. This episode will feature dozens of intimate interviews which unlock the spiritual motivations behind some of Texas’ most powerful lawmakers.

On Wednesday at 7 pm tune into Supernature – Wild FlyersDefying Gravity” and explore the basic principles of flight to see how animals become airborne in the first place.

Next at 8 pm Wednesday, join NOVAMaking North America: Origins” and experience the colossal geologic forces that shaped our continent over 3 billion years.

Follow the story of how, from a fertilized egg, you took on human form in the womb on 9 Months That Made You: The First 8 Weeks. Chart the metamorphosis from the lizard-like, mouse-like and monkey-like forms you once took on until the moment around 12 weeks when you became unmistakably human. Watch at 9 pm Wednesday.

Later at 10 pm Wednesday, the best contemporary rock hits the Austin City Limits stage with The Black Keys and J. Roddy Walston & The Business. The Black Keys play hits from their #1 album Turn Blue, while Walston and his trio highlight their record Essential Tremors.

Tune in on Overheard with Evan Smith as he sits down with Steve Case, Co-founder of AOL and a venture capitalist Thursday at 7 pm.

Next at 7: 30 pm Thursday, Steve Jobs – One Last Thing will take an in-depth look at the Apple boss to examine how and why he revolutionized our world.

Join Chet on The Daytripper  at 8:30 pm Thursday as he heads to Dripping Spring, Texas to eat at a Belgium bakery, swims in Hamilton Pool, climbs Reimer’s Ranch, and polishes the day off at Salt Lick.

Jenny is placed on the district nursing roster for a few weeks, to extend her experience of community practice on Bletchley Circle at 9 pm Thursday.

Her Majesty’s Secret Service, or MI6 as it is known, is the world’s most legendary spy agency, thanks to the James Bond stories.  Follow Secrets Of Her Majesty’s Secrets Service at 10 pm Thursday and explore the shadowy world of spying, going back in time to take a look at some on the world’s most calculated operations.

On Great British Baking Show at 8 pm Friday, join 12 amateur bakers in the tent for their first competition. Madeira cake is the Signature challenge. For the Technical, they must duplicate Mary Berry’s frosted walnut cake. Finally, they tackle black forest gateau for the Showstopper.

Enjoy the best contemporary rock hits from The Black Keys and J. Roddy Walston & The Business on Austin City Limits at 9 pm Friday.

At 10 pm Friday, rock out on Live From the Artists Den with a musical performance by Gary Clark Jr. The show will feature songs from his 2012  breakthrough album Blak and Blu and last year’s genre-bending follow-up, The Story Of Sonny Boy Slim.

On Saturday, tune into Central Texas Gardener at noon. Get the hottest new plants with Jessica Robertson of Greenleaf Nursery. Casey Boyter’s garden respects resources where people, plants, and planet unite.

Later at 7 pm Saturday, catch TV On The Radio and The War On Drugs on Austin City Limits. Dig the best in modern rock with TV on the Radio and The War on Drugs. TVOTR showcases cuts from their latest LP Seeds, while TWOD features songs from its most recent album Lost in the Dream.

U.S. Supreme Court rules on Fisher v. University of Texas

This morning, the United States Supreme Court announced its decision in Fisher v. University of Texas, one of the most-watched cases of this term. The 4-3 decision ended an eight-year challenge to UT’s admissions policies. KLRU’s documentary Admissions on Trial: Seven Decades of Race and Higher Education, directed by Lynn Boswell of Villita Media, examines the Fisher case in depth, tracing the history and evolution of the use of race in university admissions.

Today’s decision is a big win for UT. It’s also a big victory for supporters of affirmative action. The majority opinion not only supports the admissions system that was challenged in the Fisher case but also affirms the constitutionality of some limited consideration of race in university admissions nationwide.

The case began in 2008, when Abigail Fisher filed a suit after she was denied admission to The University of Texas. Fisher, who is white, argued that UT’s use of race in undergraduate admissions violated the Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection. The university defended its admissions system, arguing that it was narrowly tailored, necessary to achieve meaningful diversity and in line with decades of Supreme Court precedent.

The Court’s decision in her case is not a wholesale endorsement of affirmative action without limits. Rather, it supports the use of race in university admissions within narrow boundaries, and only after race-neutral measures have failed to achieve diversity. The Court did not rule on the constitutionality of UT’s Top 10% Rule. It also confined its support of UT’s use of race to the system in place at the time Fisher applied for admission.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the majority, offered support for UT’s argument that diversity is a “compelling interest” permitted under earlier rulings to create “an ‘academic environment’ that offers a ‘robust exchange of ideas, exposure to differing cultures, preparation for the challenges of an increasingly diverse work­ force, and acquisition of competencies required of future leaders.’”

His opinion emphasized universities’ need to balance diversity and equal treatment. He also looked to a 1950 case called Sweatt v. Painter – another focus of KLRU’s Admissions on Trial documentary — which integrated graduate schools at The University of Texas.

A university is in large part defined by those intangible “qualities which are incapable of objective measurement but which make for greatness.” Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U. S. 629, 634 (1950). Considerable deference is owed to a university in defining those intangible characteristics, like student body diversity, that are central to its identity and educational mission. But still, it remains an enduring challenge to our Nation’s education system to reconcile the pursuit of diversity with the constitutional promise of equal treatment and dignity.

Kennedy went on to say that the university must continue to evaluate its use of race in admissions – that the Court’s support for the use of race in 2008 does not mean that the system will remain constitutional into the future. His message is that the opinion applies to a specific system, at a specific university, at a specific point in time.

The University of Texas at Austin has a special opportunity to learn and to teach. The University now has at its disposal valuable data about the manner in which different approaches to admissions may foster diversity or instead dilute it. The University must continue to use this data to scrutinize the fairness of its admissions program; to assess whether changing demographics have undermined the need for a race-conscious policy; and to identify the effects, both positive and negative, of the affirmative-action measures it deems necessary.

The Court’s affirmance of the University’s admissions policy today does not necessarily mean the University may rely on that same policy without refinement. It is the University’s ongoing obligation to engage in constant deliberation and continued reflection regarding its admissions policies.

The ruling surprised many who have been watching this case over the years. Justice Kennedy was widely seen as the swing vote in this case – a justice who has supported the concept of affirmative action in the past, yet never voted to uphold any specific affirmative action system that considered race. Seven justices voted in the Fisher case. Ginsberg, Sotomayor and Breyer joined Kennedy’s majority opinion. Alito, Roberts and Thomas dissented. Kagan was recused, because she worked on the case as solicitor general.

In a 50-page dissent, Justice Samuel Alito called the majority’s decision “remarkably wrong” and attacked both the facts and the arguments presented by The University of Texas. According to the dissent, The University of Texas failed in many ways to meet its obligations under the Constitution.

UT’s race-conscious admissions program cannot satisfy strict scrutiny. UT says that the program furthers its interest in the educational benefits of diversity, but it has failed to define that interest with any clarity or to demonstrate that its program is narrowly tailored to achieve that or any other particular interest. By accepting UT’s rationales as sufficient to meet its burden, the majority licenses UT’s perverse assumptions about different groups of minority students—the precise assumptions strict scrutiny is supposed to stamp out.

Abigail Fisher’s case was argued at the Supreme Court in December – the second time the Court heard her case. The first ruling came in May 2013, and returned the case to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals without a ruling on the details of the case. The opinion issued today ends an unusually long journey through the courts.

In an email to university employees this morning and a statement on the university’s website, UT President Gregory Fenves celebrated the ruling.

Dear UT Community,
This morning, the United States Supreme Court ruled in our favor in the case of Fisher v. The University of Texas at Austin, affirming the university’s right to continue using race and ethnicity as one factor in our holistic admissions process.
I am thrilled and gratified by today’s ruling that recognizes the constitutionality of the university’s admissions policy. The court has affirmed UT’s efforts to develop a diverse student body that brings with it educational benefits for all students. Our pursuit of excellence is grounded in the university’s public mission to provide the highest quality education for every student. Diversity is essential to carry out that mission. The educational benefits of diversity for all students enhance The University of Texas at Austin, the higher education community, and the nation.
As I said when the Supreme Court reviewed this case last December, race continues to matter in American life. It affects individuals and communities. We must make sure all of our students are able to excel in the wider world when they leave campus — educating them in an environment as diverse as the United States is one of the most effective ways to do so.
Sincerely,
Gregory L. Fenves
President

In statement issued by the Project on Fair Representation, a not-for-profit legal foundation that supported Fisher’s case, both Abigail Fisher and the group’s president expressed disappointment with the ruling.

Abigail Fisher said, “I am disappointed that the Supreme Court has ruled that students applying to the Univ. of Texas can be treated differently because of their race or ethnicity. I hope that the nation will one day move beyond affirmative action.”

Edward Blum, president of the Project on Fair Representation, said, “Racial classifications and preferences are one of the most polarizing policies in America today. As long as universities like the Univ. of Texas continue to treat applicants differently by race and ethnicity, the social fabric that holds us together as a nation will be weakened. Today’s decision is a sad step backward for the original, colorblind principles to our civil rights laws.”

Blum concluded, “This opinion is at odds with the very principles that were articulated just two years ago in the first Fisher case. What this opinion lacks in legal reasoning, it made up in contradictions.”

While today’s decision marks the end of the Fisher case, it does not end the debate about race and university admissions. Edward Blum’s group is backing two new cases that challenge the use of race in university admissions – one against Harvard and a second against the The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Both were brought by a group called Students for Fair Admissions, and both allege unconstitutional discrimination against Asian and Asian-American students. Both complaints argue that race becomes a “defining feature” of those students’ applications, creating a bar for admission that’s far higher than it is for students from other ethnic groups. The Harvard case alleges a system that is effectively a quota, similar to quotas on Jewish students in the past, that places a ceiling on the number of Asian and Asian-American students admitted. Those cases have been largely on hold for months, awaiting a decision in Fisher. If they are allowed to move forward, they could become the next major challenge to the use of race in admissions. Stay tuned.

Science Night 6/29

How do animals fly? How was North America made? How do we become human? The answers will be revealed on Science Night!

Supernature – Wild FlyersDefying Gravity‘ – airs at 7 pm

How do birds and insects fly? It’s a questions that has fascinated us for years. From leapers to gliders and those that effortlessly fly for hours, each creature has special techniques. But all must overcome a powerful force – gravity.

NOVAMaking North America‘ – airs at 8 pm

Experience the colossal geologic forces that shaped our continent over 3 billion years.

9 Months That Made YouThe First 8 Weeks‘ – airs at 9 pm

Follow the story of how, from a fertilized egg, you took on human form in the womb. Chart the metamorphosis from the lizard-like, mouse-like and monkey-like forms you once took on until the moment around 12 weeks when you became unmistakably human.

Gross Science: Our picks from PBS Digital Studios

PBSDigital

Science is filled with stories; some of them beautiful and some of them are gross. This week’s picks from PBS Digital Studios’Gross Science‘ explore the side of science that you don’t hear in science class!

What Lives In Cheese? – Gross Science

Yes, we know you love cheese but what makes it so delicious? It’s the bacteria, fungi, mites and maggots living in it, of course! So think twice next time you order that plate of ravioli.

Beer Made From Insects: A Gross Vlog – Gross Science 

Did you know your favorite beer is actually made from insects? Scientists are making beer out of yeasts that live on bugs. Yup, you read that correctly.

You Have Mites Living On Your Face – Gross Science

Scratch everything your dermatologist told you about cleansing your face because, right now, there are tiny mites eating, laying eggs, dying and leaking feces on your face.

Texas Tribune wins Murrow Award for God and Governing

The Texas Tribune has won a national Edward R. Murrow Award for the video news series God and Governing from the Radio Television Digital News Association. Read more about the award and project from Tribune editor-in-chief Emily Ramshow on the the tribune’s website.

You can watch the program on KLRU Thursday, June 23rd at 7:30 pm or Tuesday, June 28th at 10:30 pm. You can also watch online anytime!

Arts In Context Shorts: Fire and Dance

Prakash Mohandas, founder of Agni The Dance Company, has set his mark in Austin by opening the first Bollywood dance studio in the area. Founded in 2007, Agni consists of professional performers, aspiring artists, instructors, production assistants and a management team united by a common love of the performing arts and creative expression.

FIRE AND DANCE 2“Choreography doesn’t come from thin air,” Mohandas said. “For me, (the song) has to inspire me for me to want to choreograph it. When I get into that space, it’s a very spiritual experience.”

One of Agni’s primary goals is to provide quality Indian, performing arts education in various locations in Austin and Round Rock areas through classes conducted by experienced and renowned instructors.

“Austin is fantastic for eclectic audiences,” he said. “I think it’s one of the cities that I’ve seen that is so welcoming to new kinds of art forms and a new kinds of dance.”

NEXT Nights: Music 7/6

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Just when you thought Austin had enough music venues another one pops up.unnamed

To celebrate the newest music venue KLRU will be hosting a night all about music. Join us for our July NEXT Night on the 6 at 6:30 pm, 3Ten at ACL Live. This event is free for KLRU Next members and $15 for non-members. Purchase your tickets now

We’ll kick off the party screening your favorite Austin City Limits episode! Then, we close out the night with a performance by Star Parks.

unnamed-2Hat Creek Burgers will be on-site flipping burgers and Skull & Cakebones will bring a batch of their sweet treats for you to enjoy. All food and 2 drink tickets per guest are on us!unnamed-3

The first 75 guests to arrive will also receive a special Austin City Limits themed gift bag!

KLRU NEXT Nights: Music is supported by The Guild.

Guild East 6th LG

KLRU NEXT members receive two complimentary tickets to all NEXT Night events. To join KLRU NEXT email klrunext@klru.org

 

 

 

Arts In Context Shorts: Stitched Together

While traveling across Europe, Mychal Mitchell thought she would be inspired by the architecture of the cities she visited but after having her journal stolen in a train station she soon discovered a bookbinding studio in Venice and fell in love with the old-world-style of handmade leather journals.

Handtorn paper“I discovered bookbinding kind of my accident,” Mitchell said. “About a week later, I was kind of flirting with this very handsome street artist and he ended up taking me to his friend’s little bookbinding studio and I ended up being blown away by what he was doing.”
Now, more than 20 years later, Mitchell continues to use the techniques she learned on her European trip and shares her beautiful handcrafted journals and photo albums with others in her East Austin Studio.

Cutting leather“It’s really inspiring to see the way that people use them,” she said. “Especially when people bring them back to me and they are all filled up…they’re gorgeous.”

 

 

Highlights June 19-25

KLRU Highlights

This comedic series, Vicious, tells the story of aging partners Freddie (Ian McKellen) and Stuart (Derek Jacobi), two men who have lived together in their Covent Garden flat for nearly 50 years. Now that their careers are over, their lives consist of entertaining their frequent guests, making sure their dog stays alive and hurling caustic insults at each other. Watch at 7 pm Sunday.

At 8 pm Sunday, don’t miss a fair turn sinister after a brutal murder is committed on Endeavor Season 3 On MasterpieceRide.” However, a suspended Morse begins a convert investigation as the body turns up on his doorstep.

Tune in at 10 pm Sunday, as the body of a woman is discovered on the borderline between Britain and France inside the Channel Tunnel. On this episode of Tunnel, follow this complex cross-Channel investigation as they discover that this was no ordinary murder.

On Monday, go inside the continuous issue of abortions rights on this episode of Independent LensTrapped.” Staring at 9 pm, follow the story of healthcare providers and others in Texas, Mississippi and Alabama who fighting against controversial new TRAP laws that are closing clinics.

On this special of Eyes On The Prize: Then And Now, re-examine the groundbreaking series from the filmmakers’ perspective and the viewpoint of civil rights activists. At 10:30  pm Monday, explore how far we’ve come, how far we have to go, the meaning of the ongoing struggle and next steps towards equality.

Join genealogists at 7 pm on Tuesday at the Providence Public Library to research stories on Holocaust survivors. Also on Genealogy Roadshow, a guest’s African-American relative who served in WWI; a man’s Amish ties; a woman’s roots in the whaling industry; and a Rhode Island macaroni company.

Next at 8 pm Tuesday, uncover the first draft of Western civilization on GreeksCavemen To Kings.”

Follow renowned New Yorker writer and Boston surgeon Atul Gawande on Frontline Being Mortal” as he explores the relationships doctors have with patients who are nearing the end of life. Join the investigation at 9 pm Tuesday, view the practice of caring for the dying and see how doctors are often remarkably untrained, ill-suited and uncomfortable talking about chronic illness and death with their patients.

After his mentally ill mother is released from prison, Arvind, a 16-year-old boy in Austin, Texas writes and produces a play from his mother’s perspective. When his relationship with the actress who plays his mother on stage deepens, he changes his perception of who he thought his father was and the preconceptions of who he thought his mother was. Watch at 10:30 pm. Tuesday.

The Great Polar Bear Feast is the astonishing story of an annual natural phenomenon that occurs in early September on the north slope of the Arctic. Scientist Todd Atwood has estimated that there has been a 40% decline in the polar bears around the South Beaufort Sea since 2006. Join Atwood on Wednesday at 7 pm as he tries determines what causes this extraordinary decline.

Next on NOVANazi Attack on America” at 8 pm Wednesday a sunken German U-boat off the coast of New Orleans tells the story of Operation Drumbeat.

On Nazi Mega Weapons at 9 pm Wednesday Germany crushes its enemies in a series of offensives coined “Blitzkrieg” or “Lightning War.” Stuka bombers blast a path though enemy lines, then Panzer divisions cut through defenses. Together they’re unstoppable.

Tune in on Wednesday and Friday at 10 pm for an encore viewing of Austin City Limits with Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds. The Australian group perform songs from their 30-year career and their latest, Push the Sky Away.

Colin Jost sits down on Overheard with Evan Smith on Thursday at 7 pm. Jost is co‐anchor of SNL’s “Weekend Update.” He was previously co‐head writer and a staff writer at SNL. Colin has won three Writers Guild Awards, a Peabody Award and has been nominated for multiple Emmy Awards for his SNL writing. He also writes occasionally for The New Yorker.

At 7:30 pm Thursday, God & Governing explores the role Texas lawmakers’ personal religious beliefs increasingly play in their legislative decision-making.

For years, Eastside Memorial High School has been plagued by failing test scores and negative headlines. An Eastside Education spends one semester at one of Austin’s lowest-income schools, as teachers, parents, administrators, and students fight to meet state accountability standards or watch their school be closed. Tune in at 8 pm Thursday.

Chet heads to one of Texas’s largest cities to explore its amazing missions not called “The Alamo” and to explore the artistic and German area known as Southtown. Watch on The Daytripper at 8:30 pm Thursday.

Jimi Hendrix: American Masters at 8 pm Friday unveils previously unseen performance footage – such as the 1968 Miami Pop Festival -and home movies while sourcing an extensive archive of photographs, drawings, family letters and more to provide new insight into the musician’s personality and genius with interviews with Hendrix himself, commentary from well-known friends and musicians including Paul McCartney, Noel Redding, Mitch Mitchell, Billy Cox, Eddie Kramer, Steve Winwood, as well as revealing glimpses into Jimi from those closest to him.

Find out what really kills plants in summer on June 25 episode of Central Texas Gardener airing at noon.

The best contemporary rock hits the Austin City Limits stage with The Black Keys and J. Roddy Walston & The Business Saturday at 7 pm. The Black Keys play hits from their #1 album Turn Blue, while Walston and his trio highlight their record Essential Tremors.