Highlights July 3-9

KLRU Highlights

On Sunday at 7pm on Dancing On The Edge, follow the band on a private train ride to a picnic arranged by Donaldson. Stanley and Pamela begin an affair, Julian becomes infatuated with Jessie and band manager Wesley is deported. The Prince of Wales hears the band and expresses his approval.

After a Dutch au pair goes missing, Endeavour explores the disparate worlds of Oxford’s scientific academia, the city’s vast parks and the untamed wilderness of Oxfordshire countryside on Endeavour Season 3 On Masterpiece at 8 pm Sunday.

Next at 9:30 pm Sunday on Tunnel, the serial killer steps up his cross-Channel campaign, targeting an elderly victim in his “moral” crusade. The race is on for police in Britain and France to identify and capture the murderer before more lives are brutally lost.

Later at 10:30 pm Sunday on Father Brown, he discovers the truth of a crime by looking into the truth of the soul – the passions, dark secrets, hidden desires.

On Monday, join the festivities for America’s national Independence Day on Capitol Fourth at 7 pm and 8:30 pm. The celebration of our country’s 240th birthday airs live from the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol before an audience of hundreds of thousands and millions at home.

National Parks Of Texas: In Contact With Beauty at 10 pm Monday  shares how these parks were created and reveals the secrets they hold. Travel with us on a trip around the state and across time to experience the past, present and future of the national parks of Texas.

Tune into Genealogy Roadshow on Tuesday at 7 pm as the team travels to St. Louis’ historic Union Station. The team uncovers fascinating family stories from Missouri. A musician hopes to find connections to a famous St. Louis jazz composer; two sisters explore links to a survivor of the legendary Donner Party; an Italian-American woman finds out if she is related to Italian royalty; and a schoolteacher who has all the answers for her students has very few about her own past.

Later on Greeks at 8 pm Tuesday, watch as ancient Greece’s legacy is invoked in Athens and at the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court. Take a look back at its rise and fall, which might not only help us understand the challenges we face now, but also point toward a better future.

Portrait Of Wally at 9 pm Tuesday the documentary takes you on that journey. The 13-year war over “Wally” was more than a dispute over property stolen from Jews during the Holocaust. It was a battle over history and memory. This time, the truth won.

At 10:30 pm Tuesday, don’t miss FrontlineThe Secret History of ISIS.‘ From veteran Frontline filmmaker Michael Kirk and his team comes the inside story of the creation of ISIS, and how the United States missed the many warning signs. The film uncovers the terror group’s earliest plans, the Islamic radicals who became its leaders, and the American failures to stop ISIS’s brutal rise.

On Wednesday at 7 pm, explore the extremes of true flight: power, acceleration, top speed, maneuverability and endurance. Many animals take to the skies for a split second, but to stay there, the planet’s strongest flyers push the laws of physics to the limit. Watch Supernature – Wild FlyersMasters Of The Sky.’

How did massive volcanic eruptions, inland seas, and land bridges pave the way for life?  Find out at 8 pm Wednesday on NOVA Making North America: Life.’

Next at 9 pm Wednesday on 9 Months That Made You, learn how you became the unique individual you are. No two people-even “identical” twins-are identical. Through riveting examples, explore how you reached your height, how your face was formed, why you’re likely right-handed, even your sexuality.

At 10 pm  Wednesday and Friday on Austin City Limits, dig the best in modern rock with TV on the Radio and The War on Drugs. TVOTR showcases cuts from their latest LP Seeds, while TWOD features songs from its most recent album Lost in the Dream.

On Thursday at 7pm, Wendy Davis sits down on Overheard with Evan Smith. Davis is a former Democratic Texas State Senator.

At 7:30 pm Thursday, Mental Health Matters brings viewers across the state to meet dozens of urban and rural Texans finding or providing care in innovative ways. This newsmagazine program mixed in-depth documentary reporting, plus analysis and reaction from leading mental health experts.

Next at 8 pm Thursday on The Daytripper, Chet heads to no-man’s land to canoe the “most pristine river in Texas.” On this multi-day canoe trip, he fishes, camps on the banks of this blue river, and learns what it takes to survive in the middle of nowhere.

On The Bletchley Circle at 9 pm Thursday, Alice Merren is in prison awaiting trial for the murder of her former Bletchley Park colleague. Jean, believing Alice is covering for someone, begins to reunite the circle to help establish the innocence of one of their own. The women use the skills honed at Bletchley Park — and take dangerous chances — to try to exonerate Alice. Don’t miss part two of this episode at 10 pm.

At 8 pm Friday on Great British Baking Show, watch the remaining 11 bakers tackle biscuits. Biscotti are the Signature challenge, while the Technical demands puff pastry arlettes. The Showstopper task is to create and build an edible biscuit box filled with 36 biscuits of a different flavor.

As the world’s attention turns to Rio de Janeiro for the August 2016 Olympics, Chef Hubert Keller explores and celebrates Rio’s exciting and vibrant culinary scene at 9 pm Friday on Get Ready To Rio! Special With Hubert Keller.

On Saturday at noon, create romantic cottage style with natives and go for dreamy gardens even on patios and balconies on Central Texas Gardener.

At 7 pm Saturday, Austin City Limits showcases the best alternative rock with Jim James and the Black Angels. My Morning Jacket leader James plays tunes from his debut solo album, while the Angels highlight cuts from their latest LP Indigo Meadow.

Next at 8 pm on Father Brown, he discovers the truth of a crime by looking into the truth of the soul – the passions, dark secrets, hidden desires. Many years spent hearing his parishioners’ confessions have given him an uncanny insight into the origins of evil and the workings of the criminal mind. But the stories are not concerned with judgement – Father Brown is more interested in saving souls than in bringing the guilty to justice.

Follow Endeavour into the disparate worlds of Oxford scientific academia, the city’s vast parks, night school and the untamed wilderness of the Oxfordshire countryside when a Dutch au pair goes missing. Watch on Endeavour Season 3 On Masterpiece at 9 pm.

Vicious Special following at 10 pm, chart a year in the life of Freddie (Ian McKellen) and Stuart (Derek Jacobi) as they enjoy their inheritance and a birthday. Violet (Frances de la Tour) moves on from her divorce and Ash (Iwan Rheon) arrives with news.

 

Arts In Context seeks community input

Arts In Context

Austin is constantly changing. Whether that be its music, food or art scene there is always something trendy around the corner. Which is why Arts In Context is seeking applicants for artists to feature on the award-winning series.

With Arts In Context, KLRU aims to pique curiosity and inspire individuals by spotlighting visual arts, dance, music and culture. Each episode is compelling and character driven.

If you have a story that anyone can be inspired by or can relate to, make sure to apply today. Apply here

KLRUQ Sunday Highlights 7/3

KLRU Q Featured

This Sunday on KLRUQ join us as we air two documentaries on two of the greatest fighters of the 20th century: Jack Johnson and Muhammad Ali.

Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnsonpart 1 at 5:50 pm and part 2 at 7:45 pm

This film by Ken Burns chronicles the life and career of Jack Johnson, the first African-American heavyweight champion and one of the greatest fighters of the 20th-century. Johnson ultimately lost his title in a bout in Cuba in 1915, after fleeing the United States following his federal conviction for allegedly violating the Mann Act, a progressive-era law intended to crack down on commercialized vice, but used against Johnson to create an example against, to quote the prosecutor, “the evils of miscegenation.

Muhammad Ali: Made In Miami starts at 9:30 pm

‘Muhammad Ali: Made In Miami’ explores the critical role that Miami played in the evolution of one of the significant cultural figures of our time: Muhammad Ali (nee Cassius Clay). The film chronicles Cassius Clay’s arrival in Miami in the fall of 1960 (fresh from earning a gold medal in the Rome Olympics), his life in Overtown — a neighborhood that was considered “Harlem South” and a vibrant center of black entertainment and commerce — and his affiliation with the famed Fifth Street Gym in Miami Beach. Over the course of the next few years — coinciding with the height of the national civil rights movement — Clay evolved both professionally and politically, piling up victories in the ring and adopting the black separatist teachings of the Nation of Islam. This documentary makes clear, it was in this period that Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali.

Science Night 7/6

Explore how birds fly, how North America was made and learn how you became a unique individual on KLRU’s Science Night.

Supernature – Wild FlyersMasters Of The Sky‘ – airs at 7 pm

Many animals take to the skies for a split second, but to stay there, the planet’s strongest flyers push the laws of physics to the limit. Explore the extremes of true flight: power, acceleration, top speed, maneuverability and endurance.

NOVAMaking North America: Life‘ – airs at 8 pm

How did massive volcanic eruptions, inland seas, and land bridges pave the way for life? Fine out on Science Night!

9 Months That Made YouOne Of A Kind‘ – airs at 9 pm 

Learn how you became the unique individual you are. No two people-even “identical” twins-are identical. Through riveting examples, explore how you reached your height, how your face was formed, why you’re likely right-handed, even your sexuality.

 

Q Night At The Movies 7/2

KLRU Q - Night at the Movies

This week on Q Night At The Movies we are featuring two Hollywood stars Yul Brynner and America Ferrera. Later, tune into two classic movies ‘The Stranger’ and ‘D.o.a.’

Hollywood IdolsYul Brynner: The Man Who Was King‘ – airs at 7 pm
There will never be another like Yul Brynner. No other actor has had his looks, his range of talents, his energy, and his capacity to draw others into the spell of his charm. At an early age he found his perfect role in The King And I. The Academy Award-winning success that might have become a trap for a lesser star became the ongoing glory of his career from the peak of his stardom to his untimely death. Including clips from The King And I, The Ten Commandments, Anastasia, The Magnificent Seven, The Brothers Karamazov and Westworld.

On StoryAmerica Ferrera On The Storyteller’s Responsibility‘ – airs at 7:30 pm
Producer/Emmy-award winning actress, America Ferrera talks about her early roles in film and television including the hit show Ugly Betty, Real Women Have Curves, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants and working with Ryan Piers Williams on the independent film The Dry Land.

Corinth Films CollectionThe Stranger‘ – airs at 8 pm
In 1946, Mr. Wilson (Edward G. Robinson) of the United Nations War Crimes Commission is hunting for a Nazi fugitive Franz Kindler (Orson Welles), a war criminal. Kindler has assumed a new identity, Charles Rankin, and has become a prep school teacher in a small town in Connecticut. He has married Mary Longstreet (Loretta Young), daughter of Supreme Court Justice Adam Longstreet (Philip Merivale).

Corinth Films CollectionD.O.A‘ – airs at 9:35 pm
Small-town accountant Frank Bigelow (Edmund O’Brien) goes to San Francisco for a week’s fun prior to settling down with fiancée Paula (Pamela Britton). After a night on the town, he wakes up with more than just a hangover; doctors tell him he’s been given a “luminous toxin” with no antidote and has, at most, a week to live! Not knowing who did it or why, he embarks on a frantic odyssey to find his own murderer.

Indie America: Our picks from PBS Digital Studios

PBSDigital

This week’s picks from PBS Digital Studios’Indie Amierca‘ will take around the U.S. featuring stories on unique towns across the country.

Story Time in the Heights, Michigan – Indie America

As Michigan native Barbra Lubic began to see the crime and unemployment rate increase in her community, she decided to stand up and make a difference. In this segment, watch Lubic as she helps an entire community simply by offering ice cream and books to children.

Lion Habitat Ranch, Nevada – Indie America

For years Keith Evans has brought his lions daily to the MGM Grand, where they were an attraction for tourist and locals. Now the lions live leisurely at Evans’ ranch south of Las Vegas. The Lion Habitat Ranch is open for visitors of all ages. The owners hope that it will become an attraction that pays for itself one day. In the meantime, it’s a labor of love.

Professor of Scrounge, Texas – Indie America

One man’s trash is another man’s living. Jeff Ferrell is a professor of sociology and criminology, author of numerous books including “Cultural Criminology” and “Empire of Scrounge” and an avid dumpster diver. For Ferrell, combing the trash around Forth Worth, Texas for recyclables and reusable items is more than a hobby, it’s a way of life.

 

 

Q Night at the Movies 6/25

KLRU Q - Night at the Movies

Remember Hollywood icon Audrey Hepburn in a special program and be on the lookout for rich eligible bachelors with our screening of ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’ on Q Night at the Movies.

Hollywood IdolsAudrey Hepburn Remembered‘ – airs at 7 pm

Audrey Hepburn was one of movies’ best-loved stars. She was blessed with beauty, talent, an elegant sophistication, and an enduring aura of youthful innocence. Clips capture her commenting on her career, and the family and friendships that were her priority. The program features remembrances from her closest friends and family.

On StoryEpisode #611‘ – airs at 7:30 pm

Austin Film Festival’s ‘On Story’ is a half-hour series that gives a behind-the-scenes look at the creative process of the country’s most beloved movies and TV shows. The show is a mash-up of footage of screenwriter and film-makers discussing their craft and films. Each episode is thematically paired with one or two short films, with an introduction from the film’s writer or director. LA Times film critic Kenneth Turan says: “‘On Story’ is film school in a box, a lifetime’s worth of film-making knowledge squeezed into half-hour packages.”

All-star Film CollectionGentlemen Prefer Blondes‘ – airs at 8 pm

Two showgirls on the lookout for rich eligible bachelors run into numerous complications during a trip to Paris.

Highlights June 26- July 2

KLRU Highlights

Tune into this episode of Dancing On The Edge on Sunday at 7 pm to chart the Louis Lester Band’s ascent, with Stanley’s help, from a downbeat jazz cellar to the Imperial Hotel and a party attended by an admiring prince and a moneyed American.

Next at 8 pm Sunday on Endeavor Season 3 on MasterpieceArcadia,” the death of an artist in a house-fire leaves Oxford police baffled. Then, when a young housewife dies seemingly of a mysterious “tummy bug” that has sickened half the police force, Morse’s investigation leads him to an inner-city supermarket.

The killer claims to highlight the ills of contemporary European society as his second “truth” unfolds. An enigmatic hosteler crosses the paths of Karl and Elise once more. Are they any closer to an answer? Watch at 9:30 pm Sunday on Tunnel.

On Monday on POVThe Look Of Silence,” an Oscar nominated film, follow an optometrist as he identifies the men who killed his brother in the 1965 Indonesian genocide. The film, winner of more than 50 awards, shows viewers how he confronts the accused while testing their eyes and demands they accept responsibility. Tune in at 9 pm.

Travel to Los Angeles with Genealogy Roadshow as they examine a family’s connection to the legendary Hollywood pharmacy, Schwabb’s; a link to one of the first African-American college graduates; a family tree wrapped in a genealogical web that has captivated the Roadshow team for years; and more. Watch on Tuesday at 7 pm.

Next at 8 pm Tuesday on GreeksThe Good Strife,” watch as ancient Greeks strive for excellence, strife proves to be an inescapable certainty-and it’s not long before the rising civilization and all that it promises will face its gravest tests.

Later at 9 pm Tuesday on Frontline, join writer and historian Jelani Cobb as he examines the Newark Police Department, one of the many trouble police forced in America ordered to reform.

Tune in at 10:30 pm Tuesday as God & Governing touches on topics such as guns, education, abortion, the death penalty and marriage. This episode will feature dozens of intimate interviews which unlock the spiritual motivations behind some of Texas’ most powerful lawmakers.

On Wednesday at 7 pm tune into Supernature – Wild FlyersDefying Gravity” and explore the basic principles of flight to see how animals become airborne in the first place.

Next at 8 pm Wednesday, join NOVAMaking North America: Origins” and experience the colossal geologic forces that shaped our continent over 3 billion years.

Follow the story of how, from a fertilized egg, you took on human form in the womb on 9 Months That Made You: The First 8 Weeks. Chart the metamorphosis from the lizard-like, mouse-like and monkey-like forms you once took on until the moment around 12 weeks when you became unmistakably human. Watch at 9 pm Wednesday.

Later at 10 pm Wednesday, the best contemporary rock hits the Austin City Limits stage with The Black Keys and J. Roddy Walston & The Business. The Black Keys play hits from their #1 album Turn Blue, while Walston and his trio highlight their record Essential Tremors.

Tune in on Overheard with Evan Smith as he sits down with Steve Case, Co-founder of AOL and a venture capitalist Thursday at 7 pm.

Next at 7: 30 pm Thursday, Steve Jobs – One Last Thing will take an in-depth look at the Apple boss to examine how and why he revolutionized our world.

Join Chet on The Daytripper  at 8:30 pm Thursday as he heads to Dripping Spring, Texas to eat at a Belgium bakery, swims in Hamilton Pool, climbs Reimer’s Ranch, and polishes the day off at Salt Lick.

Jenny is placed on the district nursing roster for a few weeks, to extend her experience of community practice on Bletchley Circle at 9 pm Thursday.

Her Majesty’s Secret Service, or MI6 as it is known, is the world’s most legendary spy agency, thanks to the James Bond stories.  Follow Secrets Of Her Majesty’s Secrets Service at 10 pm Thursday and explore the shadowy world of spying, going back in time to take a look at some on the world’s most calculated operations.

On Great British Baking Show at 8 pm Friday, join 12 amateur bakers in the tent for their first competition. Madeira cake is the Signature challenge. For the Technical, they must duplicate Mary Berry’s frosted walnut cake. Finally, they tackle black forest gateau for the Showstopper.

Enjoy the best contemporary rock hits from The Black Keys and J. Roddy Walston & The Business on Austin City Limits at 9 pm Friday.

At 10 pm Friday, rock out on Live From the Artists Den with a musical performance by Gary Clark Jr. The show will feature songs from his 2012  breakthrough album Blak and Blu and last year’s genre-bending follow-up, The Story Of Sonny Boy Slim.

On Saturday, tune into Central Texas Gardener at noon. Get the hottest new plants with Jessica Robertson of Greenleaf Nursery. Casey Boyter’s garden respects resources where people, plants, and planet unite.

Later at 7 pm Saturday, catch TV On The Radio and The War On Drugs on Austin City Limits. Dig the best in modern rock with TV on the Radio and The War on Drugs. TVOTR showcases cuts from their latest LP Seeds, while TWOD features songs from its most recent album Lost in the Dream.

U.S. Supreme Court rules on Fisher v. University of Texas

This morning, the United States Supreme Court announced its decision in Fisher v. University of Texas, one of the most-watched cases of this term. The 4-3 decision ended an eight-year challenge to UT’s admissions policies. KLRU’s documentary Admissions on Trial: Seven Decades of Race and Higher Education, directed by Lynn Boswell of Villita Media, examines the Fisher case in depth, tracing the history and evolution of the use of race in university admissions.

Today’s decision is a big win for UT. It’s also a big victory for supporters of affirmative action. The majority opinion not only supports the admissions system that was challenged in the Fisher case but also affirms the constitutionality of some limited consideration of race in university admissions nationwide.

The case began in 2008, when Abigail Fisher filed a suit after she was denied admission to The University of Texas. Fisher, who is white, argued that UT’s use of race in undergraduate admissions violated the Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection. The university defended its admissions system, arguing that it was narrowly tailored, necessary to achieve meaningful diversity and in line with decades of Supreme Court precedent.

The Court’s decision in her case is not a wholesale endorsement of affirmative action without limits. Rather, it supports the use of race in university admissions within narrow boundaries, and only after race-neutral measures have failed to achieve diversity. The Court did not rule on the constitutionality of UT’s Top 10% Rule. It also confined its support of UT’s use of race to the system in place at the time Fisher applied for admission.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the majority, offered support for UT’s argument that diversity is a “compelling interest” permitted under earlier rulings to create “an ‘academic environment’ that offers a ‘robust exchange of ideas, exposure to differing cultures, preparation for the challenges of an increasingly diverse work­ force, and acquisition of competencies required of future leaders.’”

His opinion emphasized universities’ need to balance diversity and equal treatment. He also looked to a 1950 case called Sweatt v. Painter – another focus of KLRU’s Admissions on Trial documentary — which integrated graduate schools at The University of Texas.

A university is in large part defined by those intangible “qualities which are incapable of objective measurement but which make for greatness.” Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U. S. 629, 634 (1950). Considerable deference is owed to a university in defining those intangible characteristics, like student body diversity, that are central to its identity and educational mission. But still, it remains an enduring challenge to our Nation’s education system to reconcile the pursuit of diversity with the constitutional promise of equal treatment and dignity.

Kennedy went on to say that the university must continue to evaluate its use of race in admissions – that the Court’s support for the use of race in 2008 does not mean that the system will remain constitutional into the future. His message is that the opinion applies to a specific system, at a specific university, at a specific point in time.

The University of Texas at Austin has a special opportunity to learn and to teach. The University now has at its disposal valuable data about the manner in which different approaches to admissions may foster diversity or instead dilute it. The University must continue to use this data to scrutinize the fairness of its admissions program; to assess whether changing demographics have undermined the need for a race-conscious policy; and to identify the effects, both positive and negative, of the affirmative-action measures it deems necessary.

The Court’s affirmance of the University’s admissions policy today does not necessarily mean the University may rely on that same policy without refinement. It is the University’s ongoing obligation to engage in constant deliberation and continued reflection regarding its admissions policies.

The ruling surprised many who have been watching this case over the years. Justice Kennedy was widely seen as the swing vote in this case – a justice who has supported the concept of affirmative action in the past, yet never voted to uphold any specific affirmative action system that considered race. Seven justices voted in the Fisher case. Ginsberg, Sotomayor and Breyer joined Kennedy’s majority opinion. Alito, Roberts and Thomas dissented. Kagan was recused, because she worked on the case as solicitor general.

In a 50-page dissent, Justice Samuel Alito called the majority’s decision “remarkably wrong” and attacked both the facts and the arguments presented by The University of Texas. According to the dissent, The University of Texas failed in many ways to meet its obligations under the Constitution.

UT’s race-conscious admissions program cannot satisfy strict scrutiny. UT says that the program furthers its interest in the educational benefits of diversity, but it has failed to define that interest with any clarity or to demonstrate that its program is narrowly tailored to achieve that or any other particular interest. By accepting UT’s rationales as sufficient to meet its burden, the majority licenses UT’s perverse assumptions about different groups of minority students—the precise assumptions strict scrutiny is supposed to stamp out.

Abigail Fisher’s case was argued at the Supreme Court in December – the second time the Court heard her case. The first ruling came in May 2013, and returned the case to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals without a ruling on the details of the case. The opinion issued today ends an unusually long journey through the courts.

In an email to university employees this morning and a statement on the university’s website, UT President Gregory Fenves celebrated the ruling.

Dear UT Community,
This morning, the United States Supreme Court ruled in our favor in the case of Fisher v. The University of Texas at Austin, affirming the university’s right to continue using race and ethnicity as one factor in our holistic admissions process.
I am thrilled and gratified by today’s ruling that recognizes the constitutionality of the university’s admissions policy. The court has affirmed UT’s efforts to develop a diverse student body that brings with it educational benefits for all students. Our pursuit of excellence is grounded in the university’s public mission to provide the highest quality education for every student. Diversity is essential to carry out that mission. The educational benefits of diversity for all students enhance The University of Texas at Austin, the higher education community, and the nation.
As I said when the Supreme Court reviewed this case last December, race continues to matter in American life. It affects individuals and communities. We must make sure all of our students are able to excel in the wider world when they leave campus — educating them in an environment as diverse as the United States is one of the most effective ways to do so.
Sincerely,
Gregory L. Fenves
President

In statement issued by the Project on Fair Representation, a not-for-profit legal foundation that supported Fisher’s case, both Abigail Fisher and the group’s president expressed disappointment with the ruling.

Abigail Fisher said, “I am disappointed that the Supreme Court has ruled that students applying to the Univ. of Texas can be treated differently because of their race or ethnicity. I hope that the nation will one day move beyond affirmative action.”

Edward Blum, president of the Project on Fair Representation, said, “Racial classifications and preferences are one of the most polarizing policies in America today. As long as universities like the Univ. of Texas continue to treat applicants differently by race and ethnicity, the social fabric that holds us together as a nation will be weakened. Today’s decision is a sad step backward for the original, colorblind principles to our civil rights laws.”

Blum concluded, “This opinion is at odds with the very principles that were articulated just two years ago in the first Fisher case. What this opinion lacks in legal reasoning, it made up in contradictions.”

While today’s decision marks the end of the Fisher case, it does not end the debate about race and university admissions. Edward Blum’s group is backing two new cases that challenge the use of race in university admissions – one against Harvard and a second against the The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Both were brought by a group called Students for Fair Admissions, and both allege unconstitutional discrimination against Asian and Asian-American students. Both complaints argue that race becomes a “defining feature” of those students’ applications, creating a bar for admission that’s far higher than it is for students from other ethnic groups. The Harvard case alleges a system that is effectively a quota, similar to quotas on Jewish students in the past, that places a ceiling on the number of Asian and Asian-American students admitted. Those cases have been largely on hold for months, awaiting a decision in Fisher. If they are allowed to move forward, they could become the next major challenge to the use of race in admissions. Stay tuned.

Science Night 6/29

How do animals fly? How was North America made? How do we become human? The answers will be revealed on Science Night!

Supernature – Wild FlyersDefying Gravity‘ – airs at 7 pm

How do birds and insects fly? It’s a questions that has fascinated us for years. From leapers to gliders and those that effortlessly fly for hours, each creature has special techniques. But all must overcome a powerful force – gravity.

NOVAMaking North America‘ – airs at 8 pm

Experience the colossal geologic forces that shaped our continent over 3 billion years.

9 Months That Made YouThe First 8 Weeks‘ – airs at 9 pm

Follow the story of how, from a fertilized egg, you took on human form in the womb. Chart the metamorphosis from the lizard-like, mouse-like and monkey-like forms you once took on until the moment around 12 weeks when you became unmistakably human.