KLRU Q Night of mysterious royal deaths on 3/26

On March 26th, KLRU Q brings you mystery as each episode explores the ways of death of royalty and prominent English famlies, all by Hidden Killers.

While the Tudor era was a period of change and discovery, the threat of a grisly, unpleasant death was never far away in a world still mired in the grime and filth of the medieval period. In HIDDEN KILLERS OF THE TUDOR HOME, historian Dr. Suzannah Lipscomb identifies some of the most common Tudor killers: increased sugar consumption; new, unregulated building techniques and materials; and a lack of proper medical knowledge. The Tudor Home episode airs at 5:59 pm.

In HIDDEN KILLERS OF THE VICTORIAN HOME, a genuine horror story, Dr. Suzannah Lipscomb reveals the lethal killers that lurked in every room of the Victorian home and shows how they were unmasked. What new innovation killed thousands of babies? And what turned the domestic haven into a ticking bomb? Find out on the Victorian Home episode airing at 7:00 pm.

Dr. Suzannah Lipscomb takes us back to the Victorian era when cities were expanding and mass consumerism took hold. But, from the food they ate, to the clothes they wore and the new products that thrilled them, the Victorian’s were surrounding themselves with killers. What made taking a bath and drinking milk potentially so dangerous? Find out on the a new episode continuation of the Victorian Home, airing at 8:01 pm.

The dawn of the 20th century and the reign of a new king ushered in an era of fresh inventions and innovations that transformed the way people lived. Electricity, refrigeration and a whole host of different materials promised to make life at home brighter, easier and more convenient. But, a lack of understanding the potential hazards meant these “advances” frequently led to terrible accidents, horrendous injuries and even death. The new episode of The Edwardian Home airs at 9:02 pm.

This is the latest episode of Dr. Suzannah Lipscomb’s hugely popular Hidden Killers strand. Suzannah explores the time when the British embraced modern design for the first time after years of austerity and self-denial. The look and feel of the post-war 1950s home – a “modern” world of molded plywood furniture, fiberglass, plastics and polyester – had its roots in the materials innovations of World War Two. This bright new era encompassed a host of social changes, including higher living standards and improved technologies, but, as Suzannah will discover, there were also unexpected dangers lurking throughout the changing home. The Post-War Home airs at 10:03 pm.