It’s Okay To Be Smart: Our Pick from PBS Digital Studios

Animals, animals and more animals! This week from PBS Digital Studios‘ ‘It’s Okay To Be Smart‘ we’re showing you the cute lives of otters, squirrels and even Bigfoot!

A Sea Otter’s Adorable Adoption Story 

Otters are more than just cute, adorable little fuzzballs, they are one of the greatest conservation success stories of all time. Sea otters are a keystone species, meaning that an entire ecosystem depends on their presence. After they were nearly hunted to extinction for their dense fur, sea urchins (the otters’ favorite food) nearly destroyed the Pacific kelp forests, a habitat that hundreds of species rely on for food and shelter.

Thanks to the hard work of conservation scientists at places like the Monterey Bay Aquarium, sea otter populations are on their way back. Here’s the story of one orphaned sea otter pup’s journey back to the wild

Could Bigfoot REALLY Exist?

You’ve seen the acclaimed ‘real life’ footage of Bigfoot. You’ve probably even seen scientist dig up the footprints of the beast too. But, so far, scientists haven’t been able to prove or disprove the existence of Bigfoot.

The world is a pretty big place and a lot has already been discovered, but as recent as 2013 scientists discovered a new species. Actually, a lot of of species have been discovered due to folklore – so who’s to say Bigfoot doesn’t exist?

How Do Squirrels Find Their Nuts?

How do squirrels remember where they hid their nuts? Some said it was a combination of a squirrels intuition and a tad bit of luck. However, when scientists took a closer look they realized squirrels return to their own hole despite other squirrels having hid their nuts in the same area. Squirrels even create decoy holes when it comes to food this is scarce! Find out more on this episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart.

Does My Dog Know What I’m Thinking? 

 

Do you ever talk to your dog? Do they ever talk back? Humans and dogs have a truly amazing relationship, developed along an evolutionary journey that goes back nearly 10,000 years. Do they really understand what we say, think, and feel? Recent research suggests dogs know more about our language and emotions than you might think.