Native American Heritage Month programs

KLRU broadcasts programming created by and about people from all cultures year-round, from public affairs to history to independent film to kids programming. In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, KLRU will broadcast a lineup of new and encore presentations honoring and exploring Native American culture.

Our celebration begins with a screening of LaDonna Harris: Indian 101 on November 5th. Find out more here

Warriors Return
Sunday, November 9 at 4 pm
Navajo veterans of beautiful Canyon de Chelly, AZ have served as Code Talkers in WWII, Army Rangers in Viet Nam and most recently in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, their dedication and courage in battle has not protected them from the formidable challenges facing them when they return home. Viewers will see how strong women, traditional healing and western talk therapy are helping these warriors return.

Across The Creek
Thursday, November 13 at 9:30 pm
This program is a half-hour conversation among members of the Lakota, who are seeking ways to restore their culture after a legacy of colonialism. Offering a fresh perspective into the lives of the Sioux on the Rosebud and Pine Ridge reservations, the film looks at how these Sioux communities struggle to maintain tradition, while confronting the challenges of broken families, abuse, and poverty. By sharing their stories across generations, they hope to build a vision for the future. Across the Creek was produced by independent filmmaker John Cournoyer.

LaDonna Harris:  Indian 101
Monday, November 17 at 10 pm
Sunday, November 23 at 2 pm
This documentary profiles Comanche activist LaDonna Harris, who led an extensive life of political and social activism. Her national work began when President Lyndon Johnson tapped her to educate the executive and legislative branches on the unique role of American Indian Tribes and their relationship to the U.S. government. The course was called “Indian 101” and was taught to members of Congress and other agencies for more than 35 years. In addition to her work in civil rights, world peace, the environment and women’s rights, Harris is best known for introducing landmark legislation, such as land return claims to the Taos Pueblo Tribe and Native tribes of Alaska, as well as returning federal recognition for the Menominee Tribe. LaDonna Harris: Indian 101 was produced by independent filmmaker Julieanna Brannum.

Our Fires Still Burn: The Native American Experience
Sunday, November 23 at 1 pm
This compelling documentary invites viewers into the lives of contemporary Native American role models living in the United States Midwest.  It dispels the myth that American Indians have disappeared from the American horizon and reveals how they continue to persist, heal from the past, confront the challenges of today, keep their culture alive and make great contributions to society.


POV “Up Heartbreak Hill”
Sunday, November 23 at 3 pm
Thomas and Tamara are track stars at their rural New Mexico high school. Like many teenagers, they are torn between the lure of brighter futures elsewhere and the ties that bind them to home. For these teens, however, home is an impoverished town on the Navajo reservation, and leaving means separating from family, tradition and the land that has been theirs for generations. Erica Scharf’s “Up Heartbreak Hill” is a look at a new generation of Americans struggling to be both Native and modern.

Spirit in the Glass:  Plateau Native Beadwork
Sunday, November 23 at 4 pm
Celebrate the spectacular beadwork and culture of the Columbia River Plateau People through the eyes and hearts of the artists. Together, they share their history, motivation, and the beadwork that plays an important role in binding their culture together.