January 2014 Family Choice

KLRU chooses three programs each month for your family to enjoy together. In January 2014, we will have incredible family viewing opportunities  beginning with a special night on New Year’s Eve with LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER “New York Philharmonic Gala with Yo-Yo Ma.”  Next up on our list is NOVA “Zeppelins” which is the untold story of the biggest flying machines ever made: Germany’s war zeppelins and ends with the premiere of NATURE “Meet the Coywolf” about a beautiful mixture of western coyote and eastern wolf.

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER “New York Philharmonic Gala with Yo-Yo Ma”
Tuesday, December 31st at 7 pm.
Special guest cello soloist Yo-Yo Ma joins maestro Alan Gilbert and the New York Philharmonic for a festive celebration of dance-inspired orchestral music. Highlights include a performance of a work expressly written for Ma by Osvaldo Golijov, one of the world’s most celebrated living composers, and a stunning interpretation of Ravel’s beloved Bolero.

NOVA “Zeppelins”
Wednesday, January 15 at 8 pm.
This is the untold story of the biggest flying machines ever made: Germany’s war zeppelins, which rained down death on British towns for two and a half terrifying years during World War I. In hands-on experiments, NOVA uncovers how the zeppelins were built and flown, and goes inside the desperate scramble to take down the zeppelins and make the streets of Britain safe again.

NATURE “Meet the Coywolf”
Wednesday, January 22 at 7 pm.
The coywolf, a mixture of western coyote and eastern wolf, is a hauntingly beautiful carnivore found increasingly on the streets of North American cities. Its appearance is very recent — within the last 90 years — in evolutionary terms, a blip in time. The story of how it came to be begins in Canada but by no means ends there. It is an extraordinary tale of how quickly adaptation and evolution can occur, especially when humans interfere. New York wildlife biologist Roland Kay is fascinated by this new hybrid, the product of a shifting gene pool that is now stabilizing. Kays tracks and photographs coywolves with remote motion sensor cameras, collects road kill and scat and obtains tissue and bone samples from fur trappers, hunters and others to unravel the mysteries that define this new species.