Science Night 2/20

NatureCrows” at 7 pm
Crows do not have the best of reputations. They are generally dismissed as spooky – Hitchcock used them quite successfully to frighten moviegoers, or as a general nuisance – scarecrows were, after all, invented to scare crows away from crops. But their image is about to take a real turn. New research has shown they are among the most intelligent animals in the world, able to use tools as only elephants and chimpanzees do, and to recognize each other’s voices and 250 distinct calls. They are very social, mate for life and raise their young for up to five years. And they are able to recognize individual humans and pick them out of a crowd up to two years later. Crow experts from around the world sing their praises and present us with captivating new footage of crows as we have never seen them before.

NOVAMind Of A Rampage Killer” at 8 pm
This program is part of KLRU’s & PBS’ After Newtown specials. Find out more
What makes a person walk into a theater or a church or a classroom full of students and open fire? What combination of circumstances compels a human being to commit the most inhuman of crimes? Can science in any way help us understand these horrific events and provide clues as to how to prevent them in the future? As the nation tries to understand the tragic events at Newtown, NOVA correspondent Miles O’Brien separates fact from fiction, investigating new theories that the most destructive rampage killers are driven most of all, not by the urge to kill, but the wish to die. Could suicide and the desire to go out in a media-fueled blaze of glory be the main motivation? How much can science tell us about a brain at risk for violence? Most importantly, can we recognize dangerous minds in time — and stop the next Newtown?