November 2011: My Life As a Turkey

Each month, KLRU chooses a program for your family to enjoy together. This month’s Family Choice program is: NATURE: My Life As a Turkey.

A turkey perches on Jeff Palmer's head.

NATURE: My Life As a Turkey
Wednesday, November 16, 7-8 p.m.

repeats:
Friday, November 18, 4-5 a.m.
Sunday, November 20, 2-3 a.m. & 5-6 p.m.
Monday, November 21, 2-3 a.m.

Based on the true story of writer and naturalist Joe Hutto, portrayed by wildlife photographer Jeff Palmer, this film chronicles Hutto’s remarkable experience of imprinting wild turkey eggs and raising the hatchlings to adulthood. Deep in the wilds of Florida, Hutto spent each day out and about as a “wild turkey” with his family of chicks — until the day came when he had to let his children grow up and go off on their own. As it turned out, this was harder than he ever imagined. Hutto’s story also became a book, Illumination in the Flatlands.

Q Night at the Movies for November

KLRU Q Night at the Movies spotlights a classic film each Saturday night at 8 p.m. This month our feature films will be:

November 5th: Dress to Kill
A psychiatrist (Michael Caine), a prostitute (Nancy Allen) and the son of a slain woman (Angie Dickinson) try to track down the dead woman’s killer. Cast: Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen.

November 12th: Kiss Me Deadly
Mickey Spillane’s private eye Mike Hammer is pulled by a doomed female hitchhiker into a deadly whirlpool of intrigue. Cast: Ralph Meeker, Albert Dekker, Paul Stewart.

November 19th: Four Weddings and a Funeral
The intermittent romance between a charming Englishman (Hugh Grant) and a beautiful American woman (Andie MacDowell) who always seem to run into each other at weddings. Cast: Hugh Grant, Andie MacDowell, Kristin Scott Thomas.

November 26th: Moonstruck
An Italian-American widow (Cher) engaged to a reticent suitor (Danny Aiello) falls in love with his brother (Nicolas Cage). Cast: Cher, Nicolas Cage, Vincent Gardenia, Olympia Dukakis, Danny Aiello.

Highlights Oct. 30 to Nov. 5

Masterpiece Mystery! at 8 p.m. Sunday presents part three of “Case
Histories”, a brand new, three-part detective series set in
contemporary Edinburgh. Adapted from Kate Atkinson’s best-selling
novels, the program revolves around private investigator Jackson
Brodie, a tough former soldier and policeman who is haunted by a past
family tragedy and struggles to balance his personal and professional
life while coming to the rescue of the bereaved, the lost and the
dysfunctional.

Will Ferrell’s friends, contemporaries and co-stars salute him, from
Christina Applegate, Jack Black and Zach Galifianakis, to Conan
O’Brien, Maya Rudolph and Molly Shannon on Mark Twain Prize at 8 p.m.
Monday. Followed immediately by last year’s Mark Twain Prize
celebration of Tina Fey at 9:30 p.m.

History Detectives at 7 p.m. Tuesday investigates a Civil War
soldier’s letter, fabric from an aircraft that could be linked to
Charles Lindbergh and Igor Sikorsky, and a 1950s comic book Negro
Romance.

If you ask Colombia’s city-dwellers and governing political class,
they’ll tell you the country’s 40-year-old civil war is over. But
Women, War & Peace at 9 p.m. Tuesday presents “The War We Are Living”
reveals the “other” Colombia, in rural areas far away from the
capitol, where the war is all too real — and now the battle is over
gold.

Accompany physicist and acclaimed author Brian Greene on a
mind-bending reality check and journey to the frontiers of physics to
see how scientists are piecing together the most complete picture yet
of space, time and the universe on Nova The Fabric of the Cosmos “What
Is Space?” at 8 p.m. Wednesday.

In the aftermath of the death of probably the most inspirational computer designers and innovators of the 21st century, Steve Jobs: One Last Thing at 9 p.m. Wednesday takes an in-depth look at the life and work of Apple boss, Steve Jobs to examine how and why he revolutionized our world.

Austin City Limits at 10 p.m. Wednesday and 9 p.m. Friday presents
great American music with the Steve Miller Band and the Preservation
Hall Jazz Band.

Evan Smith talks with author and political analyst Juan Williams on Overheard at 7 p.m. Thursday.

Emerging artists take the spotlight as part of AMOA’s exhibition”New
Art In Austin: 15 to Watch.” Arts In Context at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
features the artist in this exhibit that are stretching the boundaries
of contemporary art.

Chet heads to Huntsville to explore the history of Texas Founder Sam
Houston, visit the Texas Prison Museum, and go SCUBA diving in the
piney woods on The Daytripper at 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

Independent Lens “Deaf Jam” at 9 p.m. Thursday features a group of New
York City deaf teens as they discover American Sign Language poetry –
eventually stepping into the world of the youth poetry slams with
their hearing peers.

PBS ARTS from the Blue Ridge Mountains at 8 p.m. Friday traces the
history of the banjo from its arrival in the United States from Africa
in the early 1600s to the 21st century, and explores the roots of
American music — the minstrel show, ragtime and early jazz, blues,
old-time, folk, bluegrass and country.

Get ideas for plants that make it through both drought and hard freezes on Central Texas Gardener at noon Saturday. On tour, visit a down-sized garden that packs a big punch.

Austin City Limits at 7 p.m. Saturday showcases the best in modern
country with Miranda Lambert and Jeff Bridges. The multiple
award-winning Lambert performs her greatest hits, followed by actor
Bridges in his music television debut.

Science Night 11/2

Wednesday Science Night for November 2nd presents:

Nature: The Animal House 7 pm
Animals build homes for reasons very similar to our own, but they’ve been doing it for much longer. From a small depression in the sand to an elaborate, multi-chambered tunnel – animal structures can be simple or architectural marvels. In each case, the goal is the same – protection from predators and a nearby source of food. These structures, whether a nest, a burrow or a mound, are also the site of great dramas and extraordinary behaviors. From master builders like termites and beavers, to master decorators like the bowerbird, which places colorful flowers at the entrance to its nest, “The Animal House” will be a global look at the “homelife of wildlife.”

NOVA: The Fabric of the Cosmos: “What Is Space?” 8 pm
Accompany physicist and acclaimed author Brian Greene on a mind-bending reality check and journey to the frontiers of physics to see how scientists are piecing together the most complete picture yet of space, time and the universe. Space. It separates you from me, one galaxy from the next and atoms from each other. It is everywhere in the universe. But to most of us, space is nothing, an empty void. Well, it turns out space is not what it seems. From the passenger seat of a New York cab driving near the speed of light to a pool hall where billiard tables do fantastical things, Greene reveals space as a dynamic fabric that can stretch, twist, warp and ripple under the influence of gravity. Stranger still is a newly discovered ingredient of space that actually makes up 70% of the universe. Physicists call it dark energy because while they know it’s out there, driving space to expand ever more quickly, they have no idea what it is. Probing space on the smallest scales only makes the mysteries multiply down there; things are going on that physicists today can barely fathom. To top it off, some of the strangest places in space, black holes, have led scientists to propose that like the hologram on your credit card, space may just be a projection of a deeper two-dimensional reality, taking place on a distant surface that surrounds us. Space, far from being empty, is filled with some of the deepest mysteries of our times.

Steve Jobs: One Last Thing 9 pm
In the aftermath of the death of probably the most inspirational computer designers and innovators of the 21st century, this film takes an in-depth look at the life and work of Apple boss, Steve Jobs to examine how and why he revolutionized our world.

In the Studio: John Hodgman tapes Overheard 11/8

Please join KLRU’s Overheard with Evan Smith for an interview with John Hodgman.

DATE: November 8
TIME: 4 p.m. (Doors open at 3:30 p.m.)
LOCATION: KLRU’s Studio 6A (map).
The event is free but an RSVP is required. RSVP now

John Hodgman works as a PC in commercials, appears on The Daily Show as the program’s Resident Expert, maintains a startling number of online sites and also writes books. He’s in Austin to publicize his latest book, That Is All, described by the publisher as a guide to COMPLETE WORLD KNOWLEDGE. (Yes, the caps are theirs.) The book is described by us as laugh-out-loud funny but otherwise completely indescribable. Join us in the studio to hear what Hodgman has to say.

Overheard with Evan Smith is now in its second season of great conversation with fascinating people, always on the news and always with a sense of humor. The show features in-depth interviews with a mix of guests from politics, the arts, literature, journalism, business, sports and more, and reaches PBS stations from California to Florida. We hope you’ll be there for the second season of this exciting program.

In the Studio: Len Downie, Jr. tapes Overheard 11/1

Please join KLRU’s Overheard with Evan Smith for an interview with Len Downie, Jr.

DATE: November 1
TIME: 1 p.m. (Doors open at 12:30 p.m.)
LOCATION: KLRU’s Studio 6A
RSVP: The event is free but an RSVP is required. RSVP now

For seventeen years, Downie served as executive editor of The Washington Post, succeeding Ben Bradlee in that position. The paper won 25 Pulitzer
Prizes during his time in that position. Downie began his 44-year career with the paper as an intern in 1964, holding a wide variety of positions and helping to supervise the Post’s coverage of Watergate as deputy metro editor. He now teaches journalism at Arizona State University. In addition to his work as a journalist, Downie has published five books, including four works of non-fiction and one novel.

Join us for Overheard with Evan Smith’s second season of great conversation with fascinating people, always on the news and always with a sense of humor. The show features in-depth interviews with a mix of guests from politics, the arts, literature, journalism, business, sports and more, and reaches PBS stations from California to Florida. We hope you’ll be there for the second season of this exciting program.

Women, War & Peace: The War We Are Living 11/1

Women, War & Peace, a new five-hour series airing at 9pm Tuesdays through October and November, is a comprehensive global media initiative on women’s strategic role in global conflict.  A co-production of THIRTEEN and Fork Films, Women, War & Peace challenges the conventional wisdom that war and peace are men’s domain and places women at the center of an urgent dialogue about conflict and security. Featuring narrators Matt Damon, Tilda Swinton, Geena Davis and Alfre Woodard, the series reveals that the majority of today’s conflicts are not fought by nations and their armies, but rather by gangs, insurgent groups, and warlords armed with small arms and improvised weapons.  Women have become primary targets in these conflicts and though they are suffering unprecedented casualties they are simultaneously emerging as critical partners in brokering peace and as leaders in forging new international laws governing conflict.  With depth and complexity, Women, War & Peace spotlights the stories of women in conflict zones from Bosnia to Afghanistan, and Colombia to Liberia.

November 1 – The War We Are Living

If you ask Colombia’s city-dwellers and governing political class, they’ll tell you the country’s forty-year-old civil war is over. But The War We Are Living reveals the “other” Colombia, in rural areas far away from the capitol, where the war is all too real – and now the battle is over gold. In Cauca, a mountainous region in Colombia’s Pacific southwest, two extraordinary Afro-Colombian women are fighting to hold onto the gold-rich land that has sustained their community through small-scale mining for centuries. Clemencia Carabali and Francia Marquez are part of a powerful network of female leaders, who found that in wartime women can organize more freely than men. As they defy paramilitary death threats and insist on staying on their land, Carabali and Marquez are standing up for a generation of Colombians who have been terrorized and forcibly displaced as a deliberate strategy of war. If they lose the battle, they and thousands of their neighbors will join Colombia’s four million people – most of them women and children – who have been uprooted from their homes and livelihoods. Narrated by Alfre Woodard. Written by Pamela Hogan and Oriana Zill de Granados. Produced by Oriana Zill de Granados.

PBS Arts Festival: Miami City Ballet 10/28

The Art of Dia de los Muertos from KLRU Collective on Vimeo.

Art lovers, looking for something new to strike your fancy? Well in an effort to give you a weekly exclusive pass to see emerging art from around the nation, PBS Arts Fall Festival is showcasing full-length performances, artist and performer profiles, behind-the-scenes documentaries and mini-films about the art scenes in Miami, San Francisco, Cleveland, Chicago, the Blue Ridge Mountains and more.

On Friday, October 28, witness the grace and beauty of one of America’s finest dance companies, Edward Villella’s Miami City Ballet, in a trio of signature works by George Balanchine and Twyla Tharp on PBS Arts from Miami: Great Performances “Miami City Ballet Dances Balanchine & Tharp” at 8 p.m.

Next up, learn about afro-cuban music, a genre defined in America by one of the late great bassists and composers, Israel “Cachao” Lopez in a mini documentary called, Cachao: Uno Mas.

Then on The Art of Dia de los Muertos, discover the personal history and unique art of this holiday through the stories of a San Antonio artist who expertly captures this rich cultural heritage.

Explore the creation of an original performance by the award-winning international dance company Troika Ranch at 9:30 p.m. Loopdiver: The Journey of a Dance, follows company members over a two-year period as they struggle with the extreme physical and emotional demands of creating a new experimental work.

The Decemberists and Gillian Welch showcase the best in contemporary songwriting on Austin City Limits at 10 p.m.

Highlights Oct. 23 to 29

Masterpiece Mystery! at 8 p.m. Sunday presents part two of “Case Histories”, a brand new, three-part detective series set in contemporary Edinburgh. Adapted from Kate Atkinson’s best-selling novels, the program revolves around private investigator Jackson Brodie, a tough former soldier and policeman who is haunted by a past family tragedy and struggles to balance his personal and professional life while coming to the rescue of the bereaved, the lost and the dysfunctional.

Peter Yarrow, Noel Paul Stookey and Mary Travers recalls the beginnings of the cultural revolution of the 1960′s when music emerged as a unifying force midst the hopeful, idealistic and sometimes turbulent, movements of social change on “Carry It On: A Musical Legacy” at 9 p.m. Monday.

History Detectives at 7 p.m. Tuesday investigates a Civil War soldier’s letter, fabric from an aircraft that could be linked to Charles Lindbergh and Igor Sikorsky, and a 1950s comic book Negro Romance.

Women, War & Peace at 9 p.m. Tuesday presents “Peace Unveiled”, the  story of three women in Afghanistan who are risking their lives to make sure that women have a seat at the negotiating table. Tilda Swinton narrates.

East Austin Stories Presents at 10 and 10:30 p.m. Tuesday features short documentaries filmed in the Spring of 2010 by students within the Department of Radio, Television, and Film at the University of Texas at Austin.

Nature at 7 p.m. Wednesday presents “Invasion of the Giant Pythons”, an investigation of how Florida’s Everglades National Park became a haven for the predatory reptiles.

Nova at 8 p.m. Wednesday attempts to unravel more mysteries from Otzi the Iceman, the famous mummified corpse pulled from a glacier in the Italian Alps nearly two decades ago on “Iceman Murder Mystery”.

Secrets of the Dead at 9 p.m. Wednesday paints a new picture of the violent relations between the Aztecs and the Conquistadors and rewrites much of what we thought we knew about the Aztec civilization on “Aztec Massacre”.

The Decemberists and Gillian Welch showcase the best in contemporary songwriting on Austin City Limits at 10 p.m. Wednesday and 9:30 p.m.
Friday.

Evan Smith interviews Andrew Card at 7 p.m. Thursday on Overheard with Evan Smith.

Discover the personal history and unique art of Dia de los Muertos through the stories of San Antonio artists who capture this rich cultural heritage on Arts in Context at 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

Chet heads to “cowtown” to visit the historic Fort Worth Stockyards, take a horseback ride, visit their art museums, and attend the Stockyards Rodeo on The Daytripper at 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

Independent Lens at 9 p.m. Thursday presents “Lives Worth Living”, the story of Fred Fay’s struggle to survive after a spinal cord injury and the small group of dedicated activists who formed the Disability Rights Movement to drive the nation towards equal rights.

PBS Arts from Miami presents spotlights one of America’s finest regional ballet companies, Edward Villella’s Miami City Ballet, and showcases several of their critically acclaimed performances at 8 p.m. Friday.

Garden designer Patrick Kirwin creates a new look in lawns with drought-hardy diversity on Central Texas Gardener at noon Saturday. On tour, visit East Side Patch, where discovery replaced lawn.

Austin City Limits at 7 p.m. Saturday presents great American music with the Steve Miller Band and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band.

Science Night: 10/26

Nature: Invasion of the Giant Pythons
Florida’s Everglades National Park is one of the last great wildlife refuges in the United States, home to numerous unique and endangered mammals, trees, plants, birds and turtles, as well as half a million alligators. However, the Everglades is also the dumping ground for many animal invaders over 15 species of parrot, 75 kinds of fish and 30 different reptiles from places as far away as Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. All of the intruders found their way into the park either by accidental escape from pet owners or intentional releases by people no longer wishing to care for an exotic species. Add to the mix tens of thousands of giant pythons, snakes that can grow to 20 feet and weigh nearly 300 pounds, some released into the wild by irresponsible pet owners, some escapees from almost 200 wildlife facilities destroyed by Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The predatory pythons slithered into this protected wilderness and thrived, and the refuge has consequently become less of a haven and more of a killing ground every day since then.

NOVA: Iceman Murder Mystery

He’s been dead for more than 5,000 years. He’s been poked, prodded and probed by scientists for the last 20. And yet today, Otzi the Iceman, the famous mummified corpse pulled from a glacier in the Italian Alps nearly two decades ago, continues to keep many secrets. Now, through an autopsy like no other, scientists attempt to unravel more mysteries from this ancient mummy than ever before, revealing not only the details of Otzi’s death, but an entire way of life. How did people live during Otzi’s time, the Copper Age? What did we eat? What diseases did we cope with? The answers abound miraculously in this one man’s mummified remains.