KLRU Programming for Hispanic Heritage Month

KLRU broadcasts programming created by and about people from all cultures year-round, from public affairs to history to independent film to kids programming. In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, KLRU will broadcast a lineup of new and encore presentations honoring and exploring Latin American culture.

STORM THAT SWEPT MEXICO
Monday, September 19th from 9:00-10:00 pm

The Mexican Revolution, the first major political and social revolution of the 20th century, not only
changed the course of Mexican history, but also profoundly impacted its relationships with the rest of
the world. This program looks at the complex historical, social, political, economic and cultural forces
that shaped the Mexican Revolution, influenced its course, and determined its consequences and legacy.

POV “The Learning”
Tuesday, September 20th from 9:00-10:30 pm

One hundred years ago, American teachers established the English-speaking public school system of
the Philippines. Now, in a striking turnabout, American schools are recruiting Filipino teachers.”The
Learning” is the story of four Filipino women who reluctantly leave their families and schools to teach
in Baltimore. With their increased salaries, they hope to transform their families’ lives back in their
impoverished country. But the women also bring idealistic visions of the teacher’s craft and of life in
America, which soon collide with Baltimore’s tough realities.

NOT IN OUR TOWN: LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS
Wednesday, September 21st at 9:00 pm

In 2008 in Patchogue, NY, a series of attacks against Latino residents ended with the killing of 37- year-old Marcelo Lucero, an Ecuadorian immigrant who had lived there for 13 years. Seven local high school students arrested for the crime admitted they were “looking for a Mexican” to beat up. Over a two-year period, the film followed Patchogue Mayor Paul Pontieri as he led a diverse group of residents to confront the anti-immigrant bias in their town and repair the fabric of their community life. The victim’s brother, Joselo Lucero, and other Latino residents became leading voices for immigrants while working within the community to address local divisions. Faith leaders mobilized their congregations, and educators and school administrators developed anti-bias programs.

GREAT PERFORMANCES “Placido Domingo: My Favorite Roles”
Friday, September 23, 2011, 8 p.m.

Placido Domingo, one of the most popular and celebrated tenors of his generation, looks back and reflects on his favorite roles in opera houses around the world.

ARTS IN CONTEXT: THE ART OF THE DIA DE LOS MUERTOS (DAY OF THE DEAD)
Thursday, September 29th at 7:30 pm

This KLRU production discovers the personal history and unique art of Dia de los Muertos through
the stories of San Antonio artists who capture this rich cultural heritage. To understand our present,
Arts In Context explores the fabric of our past. Although the philosophy behind Dia de los Muertos
(Day of the Dead) began in the Mexican culture, now it crosses all cultures as a ceremony to remember
and value the ones who led us to where we are today.