KLRU Program Changes for Monday, January 18, 2010

Please note the following changes in tonight’s lineup for KLRU (18-1)

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW at 7 p.m.
ANTIQUES ROADSHOW visits North Carolina’s Museum of the Cape Fear in Fayetteville, once the site of a U.S. arsenal seized by the Confederacy, to look at some of the weapons made in North Carolina during the Civil War. Highlights include an archive of items related to Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1966 visit to St. Mark’s AME Zion Church in Durham; a circa 1800 heirloom Virginia-made table, purported to have ties to Thomas Jefferson; and a pair of circa 1725 chairs, made by New England furniture maker John Gaines, whose value – much diminished because the pieces are refinished – is estimated to be $30,000 to $50,000

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: INFLUENZA 1918 at 8 p.m.
As the nation mobilized for war in the spring of 1918, ailing Private Albert Gitchell reported to an army hospital in Kansas. He was diagnosed with influenza, a disease about which doctors knew little. Before the year was out, America would be ravaged by a flu epidemic that killed 600,000 people — more than died in all the wars of this century combined — before disappearing as mysteriously as it began.

BENJAMIN LATROBE: AMERICA’S FIRST ARCHITECT at 9 p.m.
Noted architecture critic Paul Goldberger hosts this documentary biography of Benjamin Latrobe, the creator of the first uniquely “American” architecture. Latrobe’s tumultuous life was a series of creative triumphs, personal tragedies and constant re-invention. The film features computer-generated animation, interviews with architects and historians and location shooting as Goldberger explores Latrobe’s life, from his early years in England to his immigration to the young republic and his work on such iconic buildings as the U.S. Capitol, the White House and the Baltimore Basilica.

WASHINGTON NATIONAL CATHEDRAL: A NEW CENTURY, A NEW CALLING at 10 p.m.
This documentary film explores the history and contemporary life of America’s great gothic masterpiece and “House of Prayer for All People.” It was conceived by George Washington’s own architect to sit atop the highest hill in the nation’s capital as a moral reminder to civic leaders. Today, as the Cathedral marks its 100th anniversary, it has also become a spiritual crossroads, a center for prayer and dynamic worship for the most religiously diverse nation on earth.

CHARLIE ROSE at 11 p.m.

TAVIS SMILEY at midnight

WORLDFOCUS at 12:30 a.m.